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UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard.

This epub summary of the UK Forestry Standard, designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, provides a checklist of the Requirements and Guidelines for General Forestry Practice and each of the sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

An ePub version of the full UKFS is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (ePub)

ebook
978-0-85538-998-7
Free
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard. Guidelines on how to meet the requirements are set out in sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

This ePub has been designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. A printable pdf version is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (pdf)

eBook
978-0-085538-999-4
Free
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
This guide will help forest managers and agents in Scotland decide the best future management option for afforested deep peat sites (defined here as soils with a peat layer of 50 cm or more). It explains the principles and assessment methods of the 'Forestry on peatland habitats' supplementary guidance that Forestry Commission Scotland published in 2014 to support the FC Guideline Note 'Forests and Peatland Habitats' (2000).
A4 | 25 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-927-7
Free
Stock code:FCPG104
Research Report
Mariella Marzano, Norman Dandy
2012
Forests are popular places for recreation, but some activities can have negative impacts on wildlife. Land managers have to balance delivery of the social and economic benefits derived from outdoor recreation with nature conservation objectives. This literature review provides an overview of potential disturbance issues and a guide to the evidence on impacts from walking, cycling, horse riding, off-road vehicle use, camping, and other recreational activities that take place in forests. Greatest attention has been directed towards walking, and impacts on soils, vegetation and birdlife. Much of the literature focuses on the physical characteristics of disturbance but there is little social scientific analysis of recreational users, for example on how their values and awareness relate to disturbance, or wider social factors that influence where, when and whether impacts occur. An holistic approach to understanding and managing the interaction of recreation and forest wildlife is needed, which links ecological studies with social data.
A4 | 40 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-864-5
Free
Stock code:FCRP020
Research Report
James Morison, Robert W Matthews
2012
Forests and woodlands represent a substantial stock of carbon that is contained in soil, trees and other vegetation. They are a key component of the global carbon cycle and their effective management, at both global and regional scales, is an important mechanism for reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Understanding what determines the size of forest and woodland carbon stocks, and the processes and controls on the exchanges of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, is critical in helping the forestry sector to contribute to reducing anthropogenic climate change. The objective of this review is to provide that understanding by summarising key information on carbon stocks in British forests, the fluxes of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, how these are affected by changes as trees grow, and how they are affected by forest operations and other forest management decisions. This report will be of interest to forest managers, policymakers and researchers involved in estimating and understanding forest carbon and greenhouse balances, particularly in British conditions, how the balances can be affected by management, and what the limitations are to our knowledge.
A4 | 149 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-855-3
Free
Stock code:FCRP018
Practice Guide
Jonathan W Humphrey, Sallie Bailey
2012
Deadwood is a vital component of a properly functioning forest ecosystem. It plays an important role in sustaining biodiversity and in delivering ecosystem services such as soil formation and nutrient cycling. In the UK up to a fifth of woodland species depend on dead or dying trees for all or part of their life cycle and many of these species are rare or threatened. This Practice Guide has been written for the owners and managers of forests and woodlands who want to increase the value of their woodlands for biodiversity. It provides advice and practical guidance on managing deadwood to support sustainable forest management and the UK Forestry Standard Guidelines on Forests and Biodiversity.
A4 | 24 pages | colour
978-0-85538-857-7
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG020

Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration

Miscellaneous
Forest Research
2006
Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration is a series of Guidance Notes based on research and practical experience in the restoration of brownfield land for woodland and urban greening. The Notes are aimed at practitioners and all those responsible for restoring land back to other end uses, particularly those involving trees and woodland.

The Notes can also be downloaded as PDF files.

Wallet containing Best Practice Guidance Notes
0
£25
Stock code:FRMS002
Practice Guide
Richard N Thompson
2003
The purpose of this Practice Guide is to give best practice advice to owners and managers on the restoration of native woodland on ancient woodland sites which have been planted with non-native species. The emphasis of the Guide is on the potential contribution of restoration to biodiversity and the practical considerations for successful development of native woodland.
A pull-out Site Assessment Guide (PDF) is included which has been designed to assist users in rating the restoration potential of any site and rank the relative priority of a number of sites.
A4 | 52 pages | full colour
0855385790
£9.00
Stock code:FCPG014
Practice Guide
Andy J Moffat
1997
This guide provides operational guidance to managers on the potential impacts of whole-tree harvesting upon the forest ecosystem. It also considers the likely risks on different sites and makes recommendations for managers faced with different harvesting options.
A4 | 12 pages | full colour
0855383607
£5.00
Stock code:FCPG011

Tree establishment on landfill sites

Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
1997
The results of 3 years commissioned research in the 1990s provide valuable information and advice on this important topic. Care in soil selection and placement, species choice, tree stock type, weed control, and protection against browsing animals is emphasised. Provided that there is a sufficient depth of overlying soil, woodland should pose no greater threat to landfill cap integrity than any other vegetation. Tree planting is therefore an excellent means of enhancing the landscape and providing amenity and recreational benefits on reclaimed landfill sites.
Booklet | 53 pages | black and white
0855383518
£12.00
Stock code:FCMS007
Handbook
R.J. Davies
1987
Landscaped sites are often seeded with vigorous varieties ot grass and legume species, which, while reducing soil erosion and giving an attractive green appearance, may kill young trees or check their growth. Weeds compete with trees for moisture, nutrients and light; but they can also interfere by releasing toxins, modifying soil and air temperatures, and harbouring pests. Only when these processes are understood can appropriate weeding methods be selected. Trees and Weeds therefore begins with a detailed examination of the different ways in which weeds can influence young trees. The Handbook goes on to guide the forester through the various methods of weed control possible - mowing, cultivation, herbicides, mulching and alternative ground-cover species. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 X 198mm | 33 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710208-3
£2.70
Stock code:FCHB002
Research Note
Sarah Green, Bridget Laue, Reuben Nowell, Heather Steele
2014
Horse chestnut is an important amenity tree species which has been significantly affected over the past decade by a widespread outbreak of bleeding canker disease. Symptoms include rust-coloured or blackened bleeding cankers on the stem and branches, which can lead to tree mortality. The causal agent of this disease is the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi, which is believed to have originated in India on Indian horse chestnut. Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction diagnostic test for P. syringae pv. aesculi has enabled its rapid detection in symptomatic trees and provides a useful tool for studying host infection and survival outside the host. The pathovar can survive in soil for up to one year and can tolerate lengthy periods of freezing. To better understand the evolutionary history and genetic make-up of this aggressive tree-infecting bacterium, draft genome sequences were generated for seven isolates of P. syringae pv. aesculi from Europe, and a type strain from India. Genomic comparisons suggest that this bacterium probably spread to Europe in the early 2000s via an unknown pathway, with the epidemic across several countries resulting from the introduction of a single bacterial strain. Future genomic comparisons with other P. syringae pathovars combined with functional analyses of genetic pathways should help unravel the key host–pathogen interactions that underlie bacterial diseases of trees.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-909-3
Free
Stock code:FCRN017
Research Note
T R Nisbet
2014
Forests and forest management practices can affect surface water acidification in a number of ways. The primary mechanism is the ability of tree canopies to capture more sulphur and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. Pollutant scavenging is expected to have peaked in the 1970s when emissions were greatest and led to surface waters draining catchments dominated by forestry being more acidic. The introduction of emission control policies in the 1980s has achieved major improvements in air quality and studies show forest sites to be recovering in line with their moorland counterparts. However, forest streams remain more impacted, requiring continued restrictions on new tree planting and restocking. Tree planting can influence acidification by the scavenging of acid deposition, base cation uptake, the scavenging and concentration of sea salts, soil drying and the formation of an acid litter layer at the soil surface. Cultivation, drainage and road building, fertiliser use, felling and harvesting, and restocking also have effects. This Research Note considers each of these factors in turn and assesses the role of tree species, planting scale and design. It covers the identification and protection of vulnerable areas, use of critical load and site impact assessments, research and monitoring, and measures to promote recovery. Continued monitoring will be essential to demonstrate whether current measures remain fit for purpose and guide the development of good practice.
A4 | 16 pages | colour
978-0-85538-900-0
Free
Stock code:FCRN016
Research Note
Matt Parratt, Richard Jinks
2013
Direct seeding can be a useful method for creating new woodland on former agricultural sites. However, the success of the technique is variable when it is used to restore conifer plantation sites to native species. Seed predation by small mammals, particularly the wood mouse, has been identified as a factor potentially limiting success. Small mammals are known to exhibit preferential predation when presented with a range of tree and shrub seeds. This research demonstrated that, when seeds used in the direct seeding of woodlands were presented on the soil surface, small mammals showed a preference for large-seeded species such as oak, hazel, beech and sycamore. In the case of oak, the removal of seeds by predators was rapid and total, usually in less than 24 hours. Smaller-seeded species and those with greater physical protection were significantly less likely to be taken. The results showed that the pattern of preference remained consistent between several different sites. The burial of seeds is known to reduce predation by reducing the chance of seeds being detected and increasing the time required for predators to find and remove them. In our experiments, burial restricted predation to just the highly-preferred species while less-preferred species were left almost untouched. However, burial also significantly reduced predation risk overall.
A4 leaflet | 4 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-877-5
Free
Stock code:FCRN013
Technical Note
Alan Dickerson, Bruce Nicoll, Mike Perks
2013
The management of forests and woodlands requires an effective road network to provide access for the machinery required to plant and harvest trees and extract timber and wood products. Roads are also used by visitors for access and activities such as cycling and mountain biking. Forest roads and bridges must be constructed so that they are fit for purpose and robust enough to cope with intensive forest operations. However, building and maintaining road networks uses energy and releases carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – from the disturbance of soil for new roads and the quarrying of materials to the emissions from construction vehicles. It is important that these emissions are reduced wherever possible by following good practice in construction and by minimising soil disturbance, especially on sites with peaty soils. This Technical Note describes how the greenhouse gas release from forest civil engineering operations can be controlled and reduced, while still ensuring the development and maintenance of a robust forest road network. It is aimed at forest civil engineers, planners, managers and owners.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-891-1
Free
Stock code:FCTN020
Research Note
Andy J Moffat, T R Nisbet
2011
The removal of tree stumps and coarse roots from felling sites as a source of woody biomass for bioenergy generation is well established in parts of Europe, and interest has been expressed in replicating this practice in some regions of the UK. Overseas research shows that stump harvesting can pose a risk to sustainable forest management, unless care is taken in site selection and operational practice. Poor practice can lead to detrimental effects on soil structure, increasing the risk of soil erosion, and depletes soil nutrient and carbon capital. Stump and root harvesting can also have impacts on woodland biodiversity, archaeological heritage and tree health. This Research Note offers a synthesis of available evidence on the effects of stump harvesting, drawn from largely overseas sources but critically considered for their applicability to British conditions. The overall environmental effects of stump harvesting on forest sites in the UK, and the relative magnitude of these effects compared with conventional restock site preparation, are under ongoing investigation. The results will be used to develop more definitive guidance. Preliminary guidance published by Forest Research sets out how the risks of potential damaging effects can be minimised, notably by careful assessment of site suitability and location of activities on low risk sites. It is recommended that this is used to guide the planning and location of stump and root harvesting operations in Britain.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-847-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN009
Research Note
Suzanne Benham
2008
The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the Forestry Commission’s commitment to this long-term collaborative programme. This Research Note reviews data collected at the Alice Holt site over 14 years of operation from 1992–2006. Evidence of the impacts of climate change, pollution and their interaction with land management are explored. Monitoring of air quality has demonstrated a decline in the levels of some harmful pollutants and this is reflected in a reduction in soil acidity and resulting changes in plant communities. Meteorological data provide evidence that the climate is changing with significant trends in summer rainfall and winter cold days. Changes in moth populations have been linked to changes in climate while the decline in some butterfly species is identified as a possible consequence of reduction in open space. In contrast, this reduction has benefited several species of ground beetle, which prefer shady conditions. Bird surveys have enabled assessment and identification of possible causes of changes to the woodland bird populations, including those species subject to Biodiversity Action Plans. Similar trends are becoming apparent across the network, providing a robust early warning system for detecting changes in natural ecosystems as the effects of climate change set in.
A4 leaflet | 12 pages | full colour
978-0-085538-762-4
Free
Stock code:FCRN001
Practice Note
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | colour
085538686X
Free
Stock code:FCPN013
Technical Note
Ian R Murgatroyd
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386835
Free
Stock code:FCTN011
Technical Note
2004
A4 leaflet | 8 pages | 2 colour
0855386355
Free
Stock code:FCTN008
Technical Paper
Graham D Pyatt
2003
'Applying the Ecological Site Classification in the lowlands' is an illustrated case study of the New Forest Inclosures, which cover an area of 8500 hectares in southern Britain.
The Ecological Site Classification (ESC) model is a PC-based decision support system for forest managers. It is designed to match key site factors with the ecological requirements of different tree species and woodland communities (as defined in the National Vegetation Classification) anywhere in Britain. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white + colour section
0855385685
£10.00
Stock code:FCTP033
Technical Paper
Russell Anderson
2001
Afforestation affects bogs by triggering physical, chemical and biological changes within the environment. The primary purpose of bog restoration is to re-create wildlife habitat. This Technical Paper addresses the case for restoration, the basic principles that should be considered, the special case of cracked peat, and results from and practical experience gained in past restoration projects. Forestry Commission guidelines and the costs of restoration are indicated in appendices. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white
0855384174
£7.50
Stock code:FCTP032
UKFS Guideline Note
Gordon S Patterson
2000
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385286
Free
Stock code:FCGN001
Technical Paper
Graham D Pyatt, Juan C. Suarez
1997
Describes a site classification that provides a sound ecological basis for the sustainable management of forests and resulting timber production, wildlife conservation and other benefits. Applicable to all kinds of woodlands, it incorporates the existing classification of soil types used for many years when selecting silvicultural options. Much of this publication is specific to Grampian Region (see Research Information Note 260 for a general outline of the classification). A publication on the subject, that will be applicable country-wide, is in preparation. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 96 pages | black & white + colour section
085538347X
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP020

The identification of soils for forest management

Field Guide
Fiona Kennedy
2002
The aim of this Field Guide is to assist forestry practitioners in making responsible management decisions by providing them with a means of rapid soil identification. This is done via a series of keys aimed at those with little or no experience of soil classification.
A5 spiral field guide | 56 pages | full colour
0855385596
£17.00
Stock code:FCFG001
Bulletin
Graham Pyatt, Duncan Ray, Jane Fletcher
2001
Ecological Site Classification (ESC) will help forest managers to select tree species, and to make related decisions based on an appreciation of the ecological potential of sites. The classification focuses on the key factors of site that influence tree growth, and that are important to the rest of the ecosystem. This site-orientated approach to tree species selection will assist users to practise sustainable forestry. For example, by selecting species suitable to a site it w ill discourage the approach of selecting a species and then altering site conditions by excessive ground preparation and fertilizer applications. The multi-dimensional approach to site classification, assessing four climate and two soil factors, is similar to that adopted in the Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification (BEC) of British Columbia. However, unlike BEC, it is applicable to all kinds of woodlands, from plantations of a single species through to semi-natural woodlands, as well as to many kinds of non-wooded land. The close link between ESC and the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) provides clear evidence of the ecological requirements of different vegetation communities on a given site. This Bulletin contains a full description of the methodology behind ESC, and provides an explanatory foundation for users of the software ESC-DSS. It is recommended reading for forest managers, woodland owners, academics, students and others concerned with the ecological potential of site types in Britain.
190 x 250mm | 100 pages | colour figures
0-85538-418-2
Free
Stock code:FCBU124
Bulletin
D. B. Paterson, W. L. Mason
1999
This Bulletin describes how foresters can use cultivation to provide a favourable site for tree survival and growth. A guiding principle is to work within the limitations of the site and to appreciate the effects of cultivation upon the microsite and the wider forest environment. The wide range of cultivation techniques now available means that there can be no universal prescription and cultivation will not be appropriate in all circumstances. The forest manager can use this guide to formulate prescriptions and select techniques appropriate to different site types and environmental considerations. In outlining options, the recommendations favour those techniques that present the least risk of damage and which best promote rooting patterns favourable to the stability of trees and stands. Understanding the usefulness of different types of cultivation is critical to the efficient and sustainable management of the forest estate in Britain. Section 1 covers the impacts of cultivation on site conditions (soil and air temperature, soil moisture, bulk density and nutrients). It also considers effects on the environment (landscape, archaeology, soil, flora, fauna, etc.), and discusses the effects of cultivation on tree survival, growth, yield and stability. Section 2 considers a range of factors that influence the choice of an appropriate cultivation technique. Site characteristics and proposed woodland type are discussed. Cultivation recommendations for the major soil groups are given. The advantages and disadvantages of various cultivation techniques are discussed and guidance given on the selection of appropriate machinery. Finally, an economic evaluation of the benefits of cultivation is presented.
190 x 250mm | 120 pages | colour photographs
0-85538-400-X
£14.00
Stock code:FCBU119
Field Book
Ian Willoughby, Jim Dewar
1995
A comprehensive account of chemical weed control techniques for use in forestry. Covers pesticide legislation, safety precautions and good working practices, herbicides for use against specific weed vegetation types, farm forestry weed control, protective clothing and personal equipment, application equipment and output guides, lists of herbicides and manufacturers, sources of advice, and an index of weeds and chemicals. This publication is still available in hard copy.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

136 x 234mm | 150 pages | black & white
0-11-710330-6
£9.95
Stock code:FCFB008
Bulletin
Gordon S. Patterson
1993
Broadleaved trees and shrubs are frequently scarce in upland forests in Britain, and national policy is to increase the proportion of broadleaves because of their value as wildlife habitat. Birches (Betula pubescens Ehrh. and Betula pendula Roth.) are between them adapted to succeed on a wide range of soils and are the commonest native trees of infertile regions. The value of birches for wildlife is high for most taxonomic groups. Birch woodland is capable of increasing the fertility of some mineral soils; it supports a large number of specialist and generalist phytophagous insects and a wide variety of woodland plants, birds and mammals. When mixed into conifer stands, birch is likely to increase their diversity considerably, especially for insects and birds.
190 x 250 mm | 48 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710316-0
£5.95
Stock code:FCBU109
Bulletin
S.K. Hull, J.N. Gibbs
1991
During the summer of 1987 a survey of dieback in non-woodland ash trees was undertaken in Great Britain. After excluding certain areas due to their known low ash population, two hundred 10 km squares were visited and detailed data collected on the condition of ash in a plot selected within each square. Information was obtained on 4454 ash trees, and also on 1022 oak trees which were encountered in the plots. The overall incidence of dieback was 19% in the sample of ash and 18% in the sample of oak. In ash, the condition was found to occur mainly in the east of the country, with areas of greatest damage, both in terms of proportion of trees affected and degree of crown loss, being found in the south-east Midlands. The healthiest trees were found in the west of the country, in particular in Wales. Large ash trees were found to be suffering more from dieback than small trees and single trees more than trees in groups. The condition was found to be more common on rendzina and gley soils than on brown earths, podzols and ‘unclassified’ soils. Trees in the countryside had a much higher incidence of dieback than did urban trees (20% compared with 11% respectively). Among rural trees, associations were found with various kinds of current agricultural practice. Thus the incidence of damage in trees surrounded by arable land was 38% compared with 10% for trees surrounded by grassland. There was also a greater incidence of damage in trees near to roads (23%) than in trees away from roads (12%). Finally, where there was an adjacent ditch, the likelihood of dieback was substantially increased. The data for oak followed a similar pattern to ash except that no effect of the presence of a ditch could be detected. Correlations of damage with rainfall and pollution variables were calculated. Ash dieback was negatively correlated with rainfall and several relationships emerged with pollution variables; the strongest being positive relationships for ‘arable only’ trees. With oak some negative correlations were found with rainfall and pollution.
190 x 250mm | 44 pages | colour figures and images
0-11-710289-X
£4.80
Stock code:FCBU093
Bulletin
C.M.A. Taylor
1991
In Britain the use of fertilisers has greatly increased the productivity of forests growing on nutrient-poor soils. In fact, many sites could not otherwise have been successfully afforested. From the early pioneering work of Stirling-Maxwell to the present day, the Forestry Commission has continually tested rates and types of fertiliser and methods of application. A pattern has gradually emerged from these empirical experiments indicating the fertiliser requirements of the main tree species planted. This has been aided by complementary basic research on forest nutrition, particularly at the Macaulay Institute, Edinburgh University and the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology. This Bulletin attempts to condense this research into practical guidance for the forest manager. The Bulletin is intended to supplement field experience and to aid rational decision-making. It is designed to present current knowledge in a structured fashion to assist programme planning at both regional and local level. It can also be used for indicating nutrient requirements on specific sites, although interpretation will require greater care and field verification will be essential.
190 x 250mm | 60 pages | colour images
0-11-710294-6
£5.75
Stock code:FCBU095
Bulletin
C.M.A Taylor, P.M. Tabbush
1990
On moorland and heathland soils in Great Britain nitrogen deficiency can severely restrict the growth of certain conifer species, including Sitka spruce, the main commercial species. Until the 1970s this was thought to be due solely to competition from heather and was commonly known as 'heather check’. However, increased planting of Sitka spruce on very nutrient-poor soils revealed that, even after removal of heather by herbicide treatment, growth was still limited by low availability of nitrogen. This can be caused by limited soil nitrogen capital and/or slow rate of nitrogen mineralisation. Application of nitrogen fertiliser can overcome this deficiency although several applications may be required to achieve full canopy closure. Once this stage is reached demand for nutrients is reduced due to shading of competing vegetation, improved nutrient cycling and capture of atmospheric nutrients and further inputs of nitrogen should not be required. The major difficulty facing forest managers in determining the treatment of a nitrogen deficient stand is deciding whether heather control, application of nitrogen fertiliser, or a combination of both, will yield the most cost-effective response on any given site. This Bulletin explains the background to the problem, categorises the range of site types involved, and advises on the treatment available. This Bulletin is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 36 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710290-3
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU089
Field Book
F.T. Dry, J.A. Hipkin
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-228-7
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB007
Field Book
J.H. Gauld, J.S. Bell, A.J. Nolan, A. Lilley
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-226-0
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB005
Field Book
D.J. Henderson, G. Hudson
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | black and white with colour images
0-85538-225-2
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB004
Field Book
G. Hudson, C.J. Bown
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-227-9
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB006
Field Book
W.Towers, D.W. Futty
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | black and white with colour section
0-85538-224-4
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB003
Bulletin
A.I. Fraser, J.B.H. Gardiner
1967
The primary object of the investigations presented in this Bulletin has been to compare the tree’s ability to withstand wind forces when grown under various conditions. The only part of the root system measured is the portion which comes out of the ground when the tree is pulled over.
185 x 250mm | 56 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU040
Bulletin
W.R. Day
1957
In the spring and summer of 1952 Mr W.R. Day, Lecturer in Forest Pathology at the Imperial Forestry Institute, Oxford, visited British Columbia. His object was to examine the forest relationships of the Sitka spruce in its natural homeland. The main purpose was to study Sitka spruce as an element in the mixed forests in which it naturally occurs, in relation to soil and topographical situation, and if possible in somewhat contrasting climatic regions.
185 x 250mm | 152 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU028
Bulletin
C.W. Yeatman
1955
The investigation was initiated by the Forestry Commission as part of the programme of research into the afforestation of heathlands. The object of the investigation was to study the root development of coniferous forest crops on upland heaths to determine: (i) The relationships existing between the development of the root systems, the soils, and the types and intensities of cultivation prior to planting. (ii) The effects of the application of fertilisers on the vigour of the root systems. (iii) Differences occurring in the root systems of the species studied. (iv) The comparative ability of the root systems of these species to exploit the soils, both in their natural state and when cultivated. In the light of this information, and with reference to relevant studies and practice in Britain and elsewhere, desirable methods of cultivation and the selection of species for the afforestation of upland heaths are considered.
185 x 250mm | 104 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU021
Bulletin
W.R.C. Handley
1954
This bulletin presents the results of researches carried out at the Imperial Forestry Institute, Oxford, between 1948 and 1953. It deals with the processes that go on when organic material decays in the soil.
185 x 250mm | 132 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU023
Bulletin
J.W.L. Zehetmayr
1954
This Bulletin summarises the results of numerous experiments carried out in various parts of the country, experiments which have dealt, mainly, with methods of establishing crops of trees on peat.
185 x 250mm | 134 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU022
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1933
This bulletin is an account of investigations conducted during a number of years by Dr. G. K. Fraser, of the Department of Forestry, Aberdeen University, into the establishment of timber crops on peat soils in Scotland and particularly under west coast conditions as illustrated at Inverliever on Loch Awe. The investigations recorded in this bulletin are intended to assist the forester in recognising the different kinds of peat in the field and to assess their probable value for afforestation and at the same time to make clear the causes which have led to the unsatisfactory soil conditions in those peat areas which have, in the past, been regarded as unplantable. One object of these investigations has therefore been to obtain information likely to be useful in indicating how the less tractable peat areas may be rendered fit for afforestation.
155 x 250mm | 116 pages | black and white
0
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Stock code:FCBU015
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1932
This bulletin contains an account of investigations on the roots of young trees carried out over a series of years for the Forestry Commission by Dr. E. V. Laing of the Department of Forestry, Aberdeen University. Special attention has been paid to the association of fungi (mycorrhiza) with roots and to the development and action of roots in peat soils. Both these questions are of great importance in afforestation operations in Great Britain.
155 x 250mm | 92 pages | black and white
0
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Stock code:FCBU013
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Pests and diseases can be carried on plants and trees, seeds, wood and wood products including wooden packaging material and isolated bark. They may also be carried on vehicles and machinery where they have not been properly cleaned and are carrying soil or plant debris. If you intend to export such material out of Great Britain to countries outside the EU you must comply with the importing country’s plant health regulations. The controls may require physical action by the exporter, such as removing plant debris from used forestry or agricultural machinery, or official inspection and certification. The information contained in this Guide details the application for phytosanitary certification procedures operated by the Forestry Commission.
A4 | colour | 7 pages | online only
978-0-85538-935-2
Free
Stock code:FCPH003
Journal
Forestry Commission
1968-69
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-sixth Journal includes information on: International course on construction and operation of cable cranes, Aeschi, Berne, Switzerland. 17 June—6 July, 1968; Tractor skidding course—Sonsterud Forest Worker’s Training School, Gjesasen, Norway; Some notes on Swedish forestry, July 1968; Report of visit to tree breeding establishments in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, June and July 1969; Microbiological activity in soils and its influence on the availability of major nutrients to plants; Progress of research in plant nutrition on peat; The future of forest nurseries in Northern Ireland; Fertilisers in forestry— the future; Jervaulx forest—Sitka spruce planting at 9 ft. x 9 ft. in 1943; Helicopter spraying to kill overhead cover at Lavenham forest; Paperpot technique for raising forest tree seedlings; Aerial fertilisation at Wark forest, Northumberland; Preparations for tree planting on peatland in Northern Ireland; A new approach to the fertilising of peat areas; Forestry and landscape design; The beginnings of provenance studies; The road ahead is sylvan-lined; Research conference—October 1967. Papers presented on the theme “Where are we going?”; Teaching note on the distribution of trees in Britain; Green spaces and air pollution; Snow storm in Delamere forest; Bird life of the border forests; Awards of the Balfour-Brown deer trophies for 1968 and 1969; Access and sport; Management for conservation; Shepherds on wheels; Grizedale forest handicrafts; Studies on light, frame-steering tractors; A cheap and useful timber scribe; Notes on terms used in the pulp, paper and board industries; Sales contracts for standing coniferous timber from Forestry Commission areas, March 1969; Some chips from the old block; Forest utilisation; Wood and the homemaker; A reminiscence from George B. Ryle; With nature in the month of May; The basic precautions for mountain safety; Centenary of the Cutty Sark; Mike Smites: Trips that pass out of sight; Orienteering; Poetry.

155 x 245mm | 248 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO036
Journal
Forestry Commission
1966-67
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-fifth Journal includes information on: Royal Forestry Society—summer meeting in North Wales, 8th-13th May, 1966; Royal Scottish Forestry Society 69th annual excursion to North East Scotland, 16th-20th May, 1966; Post-graduate studies and fellowship, Canada and the U.S.A. 1964-65; Expedition to the Guyana rainforest; Scots pine: Report of a technical discussion at annual excursion of the Society of Foresters of Great Britain, Inverness, Thursday 24th September, 1959; The native pinewoods and their management; The formation of Scots pine plantations with particular reference to seed provenance; Management of Scots pine plantations; The utilization of Scots pine; The story of the Christmas tree; The evolution of the theory and practice in the management of a forest nursery; Aerial fertilization at Kilmory forest; Development of chemical weeding on Ministry of Defence woodlands, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire; The cultivation of felled woodland; Microbiological activity in soils and its influence on the availability of major nutrients to plants; Problems of peatland afforestation in Ireland; Nutrient status of boglands and their microbiology with regard to afforestation; Tariffing of thinnings; Problems and rewards in processing and storing seed; A Mesolithic chipping-floor in the Rhondda forest; Historical account of the forests of Argyll; Historical account of the woodlands of Ross and Cromarty; Notes on the history of Blairadam forest, Fife; Savernake: History of the forest; Alice Holt Lodge; Guns, from the farm safety leaflet of the Ministry of Agriculture; Public recreation in Forestry Commission areas in North West England; Wildlife and the forester; Improvement of spawning streams for brown trout; Pine martens, notes from conservancies; The latest Elsan, a lavatory suitable for our forests; The management of woodland nature reserves; Hill sheep; The Strathoykel plan; Scottish pulp and paper mills, an achievement of historic importance; The success story of forestry, major role in Fort William project; Workington— Britain’s first fully integrated pulp and board mill; Home grown timbers: larch; A cheaply built drier; Average price for each country: coniferous timber sold standing; Some aspects of labour relations; Forest workers’ diet; Trees on tip will be a memorial; A ride with Ianto; The Loch Ness Monster; Poetry; Book reviews.

155 x 245mm | 224 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO035
Journal
Forestry Commission
1965
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-fourth Journal includes information on: A tour of Finnish forests; Notes on the Sixth F.A.O. Study Tour—Rumania. 6th—17th June, 1965; Report on four weeks’ visit to Hannoversch— Miinden Seed Testing Station, West Germany, 31st May to 25th June, 1965; The Czech Forestry and Game Management Research Institute;Tree pruning: International Labour Office course at Arnhem, Holland; A working visit to Germany;Society of Foresters’ annual excursion, Northern Ireland, September, 1965; Royal Forestry Society—Northern Ireland excursion. 9th to 14th May, 1965; Report on Royal Forestry Society’s tour of Northern Ireland, 9th to 14th May, 1965; Royal Scottish Forestry Society. 68th annual excursion to West Scotland, 1965 held from 10th May to 14th May; 68th annual meeting and excursion of the Royal Scottish Forestry Society; Conifers in Alaska; Soil reaction and tree seedling growth; Machine lining out. The super prefer transplanter; The Delamere wire netting roller; More notes on nursery undercutting; A technique for preparation of peat moss for planting; Soil preparation and tree growth on heathland soils: The rigg and furr system; Can glass and metal containers start forest fires?; Northern Ireland forest fire statistics for forest years 1962-65; Forest protection and wildlife conservation (mammals and birds); A big stag from Thetford; The Thetford high seat; Forestry, fishing and finance; Some problems on fishery improvement on small streams; Protection forest for fishery in Japan; Wildlife studies: Black grouse, ptarmigan, golden eagles and roe deer; Gone west with the rabbits; Sap sucking by the greater spotted woodpecker in the Forest of Dean; The Forestry Commission builds 200 miles of road a year; The Abreshwiller Forest tramway; When the balloon goes up; Markets for poplar timber and bark; The psychological image of wood; Plywood, fibreboard and wood chipboard; The preservation of western red cedar shingles; Rings per inch in conifers; Land use policy; Private woodlands and national forests in the eleven Forestry Commission Conservancies, 1965; Work study in forestry; Accidents in forestry work in the Netherlands; Acid peats and associated vegetation types; The origin of hill and dale; A salute to Dr. William Schlich, forestry pioneer; A history of Kentish Woodlands; History of forest officers in East England, 1921 to 1965;The oak tree in Dean Forest history; Oak in the Dean Forest, Gloucestershire: Records of growth from 1784 to 1884; Bog butter: another explanation; Public response to forest recreation in Northern Ireland; Abbott’s Wood pond; Poetry; Book reviews.

155 x 245mm | 00 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO034
Journal
Forestry Commission
1960
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-nineth Journal includes information on: Tours on the West Coast of North America, Fifth World Forestry Congress; The lake states tour of the Fifth World Forestry Congress; F.A.O. Study tour in South-East England; The treatment of hardwood scrub; Treatment of degraded hardwood areas for shelterwood restocking; Forestry in the Dumfries District; Estate woodlands around Cheltenham; A day in north Holland; Overseas visitors; Temperatures at the soil surface; Sharp’s lining out plough; The cultivation of felled woodland and compacted chalk; Helicopter spraying to kill whins at Speymouth forest; Brashing cost; Planning the countryside; Operator training; Happy returns; So you want more money!; Some random recollections; The mystery of the wooden box; Legends of Savile Row; Life of a forester; A Breton sculptor; Notes from here and there.

155 x 245mm | 140 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO029
Journal
Forestry Commission
1957
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-sixth Journal includes information on: Forestry, agriculture, and marginal land; Notes on the Seventh British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, 1957; Australia and New Zealand; A tour of Tasmania and North Auckland; A year with American foresters; A visit to Russia; In the forests of the Caucasus; A Visit to German Forests; Gibraltar; Forestry in Great Britain: a review; Forestry in Ayrshire; Notes on Whittingehame; Crarae forest garden; The tree and garden books at Gravetye Manor; Tallest and largest specimens of common trees recorded since 1947; Newborough forest, Anglesey; Advice on choice and treatment of forest tree seed; A key to 21 sorts of conifer seed; A review of nursery research: 1952-56; The benefit of lath covers for protection against frost; A review of research branch trial plantations; Trials of a disc plough on upland heaths; Some principles of combustion and their significance in forest fire behaviour; An experiment to conserve water used by a Landrover fitted with a Langdon pump for fire fighting; Supply points for knapsack sprayers; A vision of F.Y.85, or fire protection fantasy; Vole damage, 1956-57; The natural and artificial control of vertebrate pests of agriculture; The wood-pigeon problem; Winter roosting of starlings at Halvana, Wilsey Down Forest; Mechanical engineering in forestry operations; Waterways for culverts in border forest areas; Impressions of forest work in Sweden; Norwegian ideas on forest working techniques; Report on Sonsterrud forest workers course, Norway; A discussion on tool maintenance instruction courses; Forest worker instruction; Some notes on timber felling; Heavy timber felling; Transport of pit props by sea; Grading of sawn British softwoods; New hardboard plant opened; Good fuel; The soil survey of Scotland; Forestry in relation to landscape; Forestry from the town planner’s angle; The woodlands of Sussex; British Bryological Society field excursion, Barnstaple; Excavations at Staple Howe, Scardale Forest; Book review: Timbers used in the musical instruments industry; Mathematika.

155 x 245mm | 302 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO026
Journal
Forestry Commission
1956
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-fifth Journal includes information on: A forestry visit to Russia; Bison in Poland, polish cultural institute; The care and use of cross-cut saws; The Mid-Wales survey; Planting forests in Wales The Chilterns project; History of Ratagan Forest; Historial notes on the forests of Alice Holt and Woolmer; Four Cornish forests; The Crarae forest garden; A working plan for policy woodlands; Lake Vyrnwy forest, Montgomeryshire; Reay Forest, Sutherland; Notes on the British Association meeting at Sheffield—September, 1956 Three new nature reserves; Sunbiggin tarn and moor; A visit to Coniston Old Man; The collection of cones from tall trees; Ledmore nursery; Notes on farm implements used in forest practice; Sowing trials of graded acorns at Willingham Nursery in 1953; Work on limestone soils at Dalton Forest, Westmorland— 1951-55; Afforestation of iron stone workings in Northamptonshire; Planting the hard lee flow; Tine ploughing at Speymouth; Japanese larch on an area of rank weed growth; The economic approach to weeding in the establishment of trees; A note on some mixed conifer plantations in Mid-Wales; Some notes on the management of natural ash crops; Cultivation of willows for basket making; Eucalyptus at Whittingehame Estate, East Lothian; Araucarias at Monreith Estate, Wigtownshire; Notes on some North American trees; Prevent forest fires; Fire on the hills; Introducing pyrology; A handy trailer for fire fighting; Notes on fire protection at Lyminge Forest, Kent; The control of deer in Commission forests, with particular reference to England; The roe dee; Fighting the pine beauty moth with the todd insecticidal fog applicator; Needle diseases of conifers; Forest engineering economics; British forestry development in the early twentieth century; Education for administration; Should we go back?; Discounts and decimals; A fish hatchery; Greenfinches and Lawson cypress; British timbers The Brandon Depot, Thetford Chase; The Ari Sawmill at Strachur; The Chipboard Factory at Annan; The preparation of wood wool at Mortimer Forest; What can there be in a ladder?; The use of wood in musical instruments; Charcoal burning in Sussex; Conifer barks as a source of tannins for the leather industry.

155 x 245mm | 260 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO025
Journal
Forestry Commission
1955
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-fourth Journal includes information on: The forests of Sicily; A tour of French forests; Fourth World Forestry Congress Dehra Dun, India — December 1954; A note on forestry in Northern Ireland; Alice Holt Forest: contributions to its history; The Benmore Forest Garden; Larch plantations at Atholl and Dunkeld; Collection of lodgepole pine seed from British Crops; Variation in branch form in the progeny of individual Japanese larch trees; Whence those hops?; Notes on ploughing equipment; Establishment of hardwoods in Scotland; Notes on planting periods and resultant percentage of failure; Treatment of felled broadleaved areas in the Midlands; Tree growth on acid soil; Planting Corsican pine in trenches ploughed in sand; Watten experimental area, Caithness; Lime-induced chlorosis of Corsican pine at Friston Forest, Sussex; Grey squirrel enquiry; Monetary return from thinning a thirteen-year old Japanese larch stand at Allerston Forest; Hints on the care and use of axes; Mobile accommodation units; Converting a motorcycle to carry two knapsack fire pumps; A handy staple extractor; A cone splitter for seed sampling; A vanishing craft, “aesculus”; The future of home grown softwoods; The thinnings house, timber development association; Notes on home grown timber and its use on the farm; The preservative treatment of timber; Newsprint production at Sittingbourne, Kent; District Officer home Forestry Commission: to be or not to be?; Preliminary working plan reports; Newcomers to Northumberland forest villages; Glenmore Lodge. Scottish council of physical recreation; The work of the nature conservancy; Bird notes from Lynford Hall; British Bryological Society field excursion, Arnside, Westmorland; A note on the ecology of the limestone pavement in Westmorland; Reflections; Book review: in the Western Highlands; Norwegian idyll; Seventeenth century forestry on a Hertfordshire estate; Ornamentals.

155 x 245mm | 204 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO024
Journal
Forestry Commission
1952-54
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-third Journal includes information on: Lord Robinson, O.B.E; Notes on the sixth British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, 1952, and forestry in Canada; A visit to Denmark and Sweden; Forest tree breeding in Sweden; Italian and Swiss research; Forest pathology in Eire; Pinus contorta in County Wicklow, Eire; Picea omorika; The British Association Meeting in Liverpool, 1953; Preserving Scots pine strains after the 1953 windblow in North-east Scotland; The Kinver nursery; A method of wWorking heavy nursery soils with a ridge plough; Seedbed root pruning machines; Raising hardwood planting stocks by undercutting; Eradication of rhododendrons; Natural regeneration at 1,200 feet above sea level at Glasfynydd Forest; A grazing experiment in Redesdale Forest; A hybrid larch stand at Staindale, Allerston Forest; A modern approach to thinning practice; Smallwood from conifer thinnings; Lightning and forest fires at Rosedale Forest; Lightning and forest fires at Langdale Forest; Thetford type static water tanks; Observations on windblow in young plantations at Allerston; Rabbit clearance in King’s Forest, 1947 to 1951; Vole damage to trees at ten feet from ground level; Dendroctonus micans, a continental pest of Sitka spruce; Fomes annosus in East Anglian pine sample plots; Forest bridges; The integration of Forest Officers duties in Commission forests and private woodlands; The balance sheet and supporting schedules; Natural history notes from the Highlands; Report of the Lynford School Bird Club; Raids on nest boxes by weasels; Natural vegetation of oakwoods in Alice Holt Forest; The marsh pennywort, hydrocotyle vulgaris, as a weed in Newborough Nursery.

155 x 245mm | 144 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO023
Journal
Forestry Commission
1951
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-second Journal includes information on: The European Commission for Forestry and Forest Products; The British Association meeting at Edinburgh, August, 1951; American commentary; A Tour of Danish forests; Denmark diary; Notes on a tour of south and central Sweden; Fertility in forest soils; Natural regeneration of old caledonian Scots pine at Rannoch; The dispersal of hardwood seeds by voles and mice; Rehabilitation at Plym Forest, Devon; The Field Officer and the choice of species; The choice of tree species in Scotland; Extension of nursery experiments into Radnor Forest; Planting beech at West Woods with and without cover; Eccentric growth; European larch races; A report of work on poplars and poplar cultivation in Great Britain, 1951; Aspen poplars in Great Britain; An audible fire warning system at Thetford Chase; Gale warning: windblow in western spruce plantations; A tree shield to prevent injury when tushing Logs; Damage by starlings to trees at Slebech Forest, South Wales; An early proposal for state control of woodland; Rights of way; Fundamentals of road planning; Income and expenditure accounts or cash accounts?; Breckland bird studies; Old brecks or new forests?; A forest herbarium; Literature on forestry in Scotland; Bringing forestry to the public; The Merrick climbed; Roe deer in Austria.

155 x 245mm | 164 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO022
Journal
Forestry Commission
1950
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-first Journal includes information on: Lessons from Sweden; Notes on afforestation and nursery work in the North-Eastern United States; The treatment of devastated woodland; Notes on the state forests of West Glamorgan; Craig Phadrig Forest; Glen Urquhart Forest; Guisachan Forest; Whence the seed?; Acorn collection and storage; Beech seed collection; Comparisons of three methods of storing beech mast; Vermin destruction in seed stores; Problems affecting heathland nurseries and their produce; Heathland nurseries at Devilla; Preparation of a heathland nursery; Further notes on compost and its application; Nursery mechanisation; Lining-out seedlings; Lupin as a green crop; Kinver nursery; Ploughing the Yorkshire Moors for tree planting, 1869; The formation in one year of a single plantation of one thousand acres; Planting Douglas fir in rhododendrons at Creag Liath, Glen Garry Forest; A new planting bag; Turf planting of birch; Thinning plans; Thinning by piece wWork, estimation of average volume per pole. (Technical Instruction No. 1/49); Pruning of oak; Pruning of Corsican pine; Growth comparisons of Scots and lodgepole pines on heather areas at Gwydyr Forest; The selection of sSites for Japanese and hybrid larches; Exceptional growth of Japanese larch; The growth of bBeech in relation to type; Black Italian poplars at Thetford; A fire at Cannock Chase; Fire danger at Clipstone; Fire beater stands; Deer through the eyes of a non-forester; Rabbits in hazel coppice; Grey squirrel damage; Bird scaring at Savernake; Beetle attacks following fires at Wareham Forest; Barypeithes pellucidus at Haldon; Barypeithes araneiformis; The marking and sale of thinnings; Methods of extraction of thinnings at Glentress Forest; Douglas pale fencing; Notes on the wood-using industries of New York; Produce from a twenty-three year old silver fir plantation; Another angle on soils; Forest roadwork in the North West England Conservancy; The mechanical development committees; The utilisation of the high tops; Dedicating the Cawdor Woodlands; Putting it on paper; A note on silvicultural literature in the United States of America; Additions to the Forestry Commission Library; United Nations Scientific Conference on the conservation and utilisation of resources; Organisation and methods in a conservancy office; The replacement of forest clerical staff by Area Officers; Publications work; On showing off forests; Rainy weather; The weather in forest year 1949; The staff suggestion scheme; A course at Northerwood; A tribute to the pioneers.

155 x 245mm | 208 pages | black and white
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Stock code:FCJO021
Journal
Forestry Commission
1949
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twentieth Journal includes information on: Imported seed; Laboratory germination tests for forest tree seed; Breeding forest trees; The elite tree; Adevice for collecting cones; The storage of beech mast and acorns (silvicultural circular No. 25); Nursery practice (silvicultural circular No. 21); Manuring of nurseries (silvicultural circular No.23); Nursery practice (silvicultural circular No.26); Soil sampling in forest nurseries (appendix to silvicultural circular No.26); The treatment of nursery soils; Acidification at Barcaldine Nursery; Nursery sowing programmes and yields; Selective weed killers in conifer seedbeds and transplant lines; Robinia pseudoacacia; Three provenances of maritime pine in the nursery; Recovery of frosted Sitka spruce seedlings; A note on Australian forestry; The census of woodlands— some impressions; Notes on the state forests in Lincolnshire; Some observations on the Halwill Moors, Devonshire; The Black Wood of Rannoch; Millbuie Forest— Black Isle; Cwmogwr Forest; Selection of species at Radnor Forest; The high elevationexperiment at Beddgelert Forest; Forestry and amenity; Natural regeneration; Recent direct sowing experiments on the Yorkshire Heathlands; Vegetational changes following the afforestation of Calluna Heaths in Yorkshire; Mechanical draining for afforestation; Hints on fencing; Protection of forest fences by tarring of netting; Ploughing plans; Planting bags; The suppression of coppice by weeding; The treatment of a sheep-damaged oak plantation at Nagshead—Forest of Dean; The brashing and thinning of spruces and Douglas fir; Recording of thinning yields in plantations (silvicultural circular No.22); Average yields from thinnings; Estimation of volume of main crop from thinnings in one-tenth acre plots; Crown thinning; The use of stand density indices for describing thinnings; O tempora! O mores!; Treatment of Scots pine plantations in the Black Isle; Larch plantations at Glentress Forest; Rapid growth of Japanese larch in Cornwall; What is hybrid larch?; Height and girth assessment of the parents of the Dunkeld hybrid larch; Observations on ice-dam aged Douglas fir at Kerry forest; Metasequoia glyptostroboides; A rough-barked beech; Highland birch; Three fine specimens of oak in the Forest of Dean; The walnut; Distribution of the moss thuidium tamariscinum in British hardwood stands; The great fire of Hattlich-Eupen, September, 1947; The Chirdon fire; Railway fires and preventive measures; Prevention of fires caused by Commission employees (Director General’s circular); Fire brooms; Grey squirrels at Savernake; Vole damage in the Border forests; A keeper’s day; Vermin trouble; Forest ornithological research in Britain; Ips sexdentatus, an insect pest attacking pine plantations (silvicultural circular No.24); Notes on the die-back of European larch; Coryneum canker of cypress; Dying of groups of Sitka spruce; Bark stripping in the Forest of Dean; The need for care when felling timber; Dragging poles; Notes on the weight and volume of green wood of Scots and Corsican pines (note from Forest Products Research Laboratory); The mechanisation of forest road construction in Scotland; Forest roads and extraction costs; Preservation of existing natural protection for old houses; The use of aerial photographs on census work; Some observations on forest maps and records; The international union of forest research organisations; European Commission on forestry and forest products, Geneva, July, 1948; Organisation and methods at conservancy level; Permanent instructions; The estate section; Filing of proof slips; The staff suggestion scheme (secretary’s circular); Sources of information; Amateur photography in forestry; Touring in Indian forests; New forest common rights; History of Blengdale, Wormgill and Calder; Woodman, square that tree!.

155 x 245mm | 290 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO020
Journal
Forestry Commission
1948
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This nineteenth Journal includes information on: High pruning with chisels; The work of the sample plot parties; Fire protection at Newton Dale; Snow damage of the winter, 1946-47; Longitudinal splits in growing conifers; Damage by squirrels; Vole damage; Insect pests in north-west Germany during 1946-47; Attack by caterpillars on a beech plantation; Canker on young coniferous crops; Utilization; Notes on produce in the New Forest; Extraction problem; Christmas trees from Norway spruce thinnings; H.T.P.D. experience in relation to forestry; Public relations and forestry; The soil survey of Great Britain; Surveying and mapping forest areas from aerial photographs; Weather and work; New Forest committee; Why did that accident happen?; Impressions of a forester on returning from timber production; Reminiscences of Kershope training camp; Polish labour at Kershope Forest; Polish labour at Grey stoke; The German forester today; What O. and M . means; Organisation and methods in a conservancy office; Office management; Forest roads; Timber extraction over clay soils; The research engineer; Grizedale Forest and estate; Forest housing; Edmund Burt and his letters from the north of Scotland; One jump ahead; Adventure on horseback; Manuscripts for the press; The Forestry Commission library; Forestry abstracts.

155 x 245mm | 202 pages | black and white
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Free
Stock code:FCJO019
Journal
Forestry Commission
1939
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This eighteenth Journal includes information on: Progress report on research; Replanting and afforestation on chalk soils; Plant roll machine; Visit to Finland, August 1938; Forestry at Glasgow Exhibition; Tractor ploughing at palwill; A few notes on American forestry; Cuttings: methods of treatment; Summary report on chafer investigation, 1938; Raising of birch and alder from seed; R.S.F.S. summer meeting, 1938; Forestry Commission Social Service Association, 1938; Social service in Scotland; Cultivation of European and American walnut; The owl—the forester’s friend; Stratification of seed of Douglas fir, pinna contorta and birch; A worker’s holding that appeared; Utilisation of thinnings; Ceiriog experimental area; Japanese larch as a fire-break; Commission’s library: new books; The raising of poplars; Beech afforestation on chalk downland at Friston; The useful chiff-chaff; Charcoal; Sales of produce—ancient and modern; New Forest deer; Firelines; Nursery sowings of sycamore; Our Easter holiday; Planting and weeding of oak; Conifer and beech mixtures; Thoughts on afforestation; Treatment of peat a hundred years ago; Forestry and the “talkies”; Fire protection at Glentress; Fire-fighting; Girdling (ringing) of scrub; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 175 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO018
Journal
Forestry Commission
1935
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fourteenth Journal includes information on: Conference of Divisional Officers at Benmore; Ink disease and other root affections; Progress report on research; Divisional experiments on the turf planting of seedlings; The raising of strong conifer seedlings; Marketing of home-grown timber; Sitka spruce timber from Benmore; The simar rototiller; Nutrient content of nursery plants; R.S.F.S. summer meeting 1934; Study of pine shoot moth damage; Mechanical drainage; Damage by voles in Argyllshire; Growth of young trees in relation to beating-up; Circular on nursery work; Commission’s library: new books; Establishment of plantations; Vegetation as soil indicator; Planting distances; Chafer beetles; Replanting coppice areas; Coppice areas in the East Midlands; Map measuring; Preparation and sale of produce; Birch brooms; Fire protection (look-out towers); Tentsmuir and its flora; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 151 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO014
Journal
Forestry Commission
1934
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirteenth Journal includes information on: Forest fires in 1933; Progress report on research; Seedlings for turf planting; Office procedure; Root development on ploughed ground at Allerston; Effect of factors other than temperature on frost damage; Spraying against meria laricis; Soil aeration in establishing plantations; Use of basic slag in planting operations; Cost of ploughing by tractor; Experiments on density of bedding-out; Commission’s library: journals and new books; Temporary transplant nurseries; A wire netting suspension footbridge; Planting of scree; Damage by starlings; badgers; R.E.F.S. summer meeting, Sweden; Treatment of scrub; A Baltic sand-dune area; Effect of slag in first year; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 144 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO013
Journal
Forestry Commission
1932
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This eleventh Journal includes information on: Wanting of spruce seedlings; Attractions of Benmore; Unofficial notes of a short official visit to Scotland; Progress report on research; Ancient monuments; R.E.A.S. summer meeting, 1931; A lvus orcgona; Use of seedlings for turf planting; Amount of weeding necessary for hardwoods; Sale of surplus land and buildings; Notes on Queen Charlotte Islands; Looking back; Summer planting of spruce; Hedges in nurseries; Preparation and sale of thinnings; Utilisation of thinnings; Planting of coppice areas; Sitka and Norway spruces at Kerry; Beating-up; Turf planting and the use of seedlings; Control of meriahriris; Thoughts on economy; Reducing the cost of planting; Soil fertility in nurseries; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 134 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO011
Journal
Forestry Commission
1926
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fifth Journal includes information on: Research work; The forests of Rumania; Working plans: the official code; Losses in lined-out plants in England and Wales, 1925; Direct sowings: a plea for perseverance; The conversion of coppice with standards to high horest in Normandy; A suggested method of planting on a poor seaside muirland; The influence of various types of moorland soils on the growth of young plantations; A method of dealing with unmarketable birch; The cut-worm— a nursery pest; Oliorhynchus picipes damage done at Margam, Glamorgan; Fire control; Timber jottings; Forestry school ex-trainees; Saving time on time-sheets; The work of an officer in charge of a district; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 88 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO005
Booklet
R.F. Wood, I.A. Anderson
1968
The sole purpose of this Booklet is to depict forestry under a wide range of conditions in Britain. The text and the captions to the photographs are kept to the shortest length necessary to offer an explanation of the diversity of forest scenery. No attempt has been made to classify land in any ordered scheme; indeed, the 'forest types' in this Booklet may well shock the forester or ecologist, and all that is claimed for them is that they are convenient 'labels' for tracts of country which by reason of topography, geology, soils and climate, have some community of conditions so far as the forest is concerned.
216 x 279mm | 78 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK024
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin
1966
Conifers, or softwood trees, form a distinct group which has become very important in the world’s economy because they grow fast on poor soils even under harsh climates, and yield timbers that are very suitable for industry. They are now being planted and tended on a growing scale in most countries as a source of wealth, and this booklet shows you how to identify those most commonly found in Britain.
210 x 197mm | 56 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK015
Booklet
H. Watson
1947
In present-day afforestation much attention is devoted to the wild plants as indicating soil and climatic conditions, but within recent times the ordinary mosses have been proved to be just as important. In the following notes an effort will be made, first to give a life history of a moss, secondly to indicate, as far as present knowledge permits, the soil and climatic conditions under which particular mosses are found and thirdly to illustrate each of these by means of photographs. The mosses selected are those which a forester is likely to meet frequently in the course of his work and so to use in assessing locality conditions.
166 x 210mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK001
Journal
Forestry Commission
1962
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-first Journal includes information on: The Eighth British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, East Africa, 1962; A Tour in North Uganda and Kenya; Note on Forest Areas in the Samburu District by Kenya Forest Department; Farm Forests in Austria, with Special Reference to Styria; Protection Forests in Switzerland; A Study Tour in Holland; A Visit to Denmark and Holland; Report on Rationalisation Course in Arnhem, Holland; Royal Scottish Forestry Society: 65th Annual Excursion to Perthshire,1962; The Royal Forestry Society of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland: Meeting at Cardiff; Problems of Soil Erosion and Stabilisation in Coastal Areas; Forestry and Landscape; Forestry at the John Colet Secondary School, Wendover, Bucks.; Opening of Hendre D du Log Cabin for the Outward Bound Sea School, Aberdovey; The New Shepherds; Game Fair, 1962; Visitors and Visiting: A Forester’s Other Duties; Reflections of an Auditor; Changing Times; Cartoon: Busy Beavers; Work Study Week at South Strome Forest; Maintenance of Power Saw Chains; A Method of Tool Storage; The Ledmore Mounted Lining-Out Plough, Mark III; Extracts from “Forest Products Research 1961”; Properties of 30-37 Year Old Sitka Spruce Timber: Extracts from The Forest Products Laboratory Bulletin; More Mighty Oaks; A Day in the Forest; The White Buck of Cannock Chase; Cartoon: Swinging The Cat!; Pine Cone Collection: Thetford, South District, 1962; Corsican Pine Cone Collection at Sherwood, Delamere and Cannock; Notes on Corsican Pine Cone Collection at Delamere Forest, 1961—1962; Coypu.

155 x 245mm | 176 pages | black and white
0
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Stock code:FCJO031
Forest History
W.R. Day, R.G. Sanzen-Baker
1938
A history of the condition of tree crops at Llandover and Llantrisant forests containing an introduction, past history of sites, history of policy and management, previous reports, topography, climate, geology, water systems, soils, vegetation, present condition of crops, factors affecting the growth of plantations, notes on woodland areas other than the forests, discussion of suitability of species, summary and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 156 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH065
Information Note
Elena Vanguelova
2007
A4 | 2 colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-737-2
Free
Stock code:FCIN088
Information Note
Peter Crow
2005
A4 leaflet | colour
0855386797
Free
Stock code:FCIN078
Information Note
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386851
Free
Stock code:FCIN079
Information Note
Richard Ferris
2000
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385227
Free
Stock code:FCIN032
Occasional Paper
G.C. Barnes (Ed.)
1988
The paper explores the contribution that science has made to forestry and woodland management and looks at the scientific prospects and limitations for the future. It explains the reasons why Britain has become so low in self-sufficiency of wood products and charts the steps successive Governments have taken to change this, starting with the creation of the Forestry Commission in 1919. Despite the fact that afforestation in Britain has been deliberately limited to relatively poor and inhospitable sites mainly in the uplands, the paper acknowledges the remarkable achievements of research in solving the practical problems of establishing new forests on such poor types of land. It indicates that in more recent years greater emphasis has been given to research that seeks to improve the quality and yield of timber while at the same time combating pests and diseases, improving manpower productivity and taking account of the increasing awareness of the importance of woods and forests in environmental terms. In looking at the future of forestry research, the paper addresses the difficult question of assessing the likely priorities bearing in mind the uniqueness of the crop. It suggests that the trend towards more fundamental research will continue and speculates that the fields which are most likely to hold the greatest potential for enhancing forest resources in future will be tree growth — including advances in molecular biology; environmental factors — including research on broadleaves, pests and diseases and soil as well as the effects of afforestation on water, wildlife and the landscape; and research on projects arising from possible land use changes in agriculture — which will hinge on political decisions by Government. The paper concludes that the overriding prescription for progress is to ensure that people of vision and energy are chosen to lead and conduct research programmes and then given as much freedom as management’s accountability will allow.
190 x 245mm | 70 pages | black and white
0-85538-218-X
Free
Stock code:FCOP016
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1970
Report on Forest Research for the year ended March 1970, which includes:

Work carried out by Forestry Commission research and development staff
Forest tree seed; production of planting stock; planting; choice of species; minor species survey; provenance; arboriculture; nutrition of forest crops; forest weed control; soil studies; drainage; cultivation; crop stability; regeneration; ecology; forest genetics; forest pathology; forest entomology; mammals and birds; statistics and computing; research workshop; photography; publications; research information; planning and economics; work study; timber utilisation.

Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission at universities and other institutions
- Nursery and forest extension experiments in tree nutrition
- Research on forest soils and tree nutrition
- Conifer seedling pathology
- Role of lophodermella species in premature death of pine needles in Scotland
- Virus diseases of forest trees
- Studies on insect viruses
- Research on the green spruce aphid, elatobium abietinum
- Studies on tit and pine looper moth populations at Culbin Forest
- Fish populations in forest streams
- Hydrological relations of forest and moorland vegetation
- The rate of spread of head fires in the New Forest, Hampshire

150 x 240mm | 257 pages | black and white
11-710109-5
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1970
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1969
Report on Forest Research for the year ending March 1969 which includes:

Work carried out by Forestry Commission research and development staff
Forest tree seed; production of planting stock, site studies and the role of minor species; provenance; choice of species; arboriculture; planting; nutrition of forest - crops; forest weed control ; soil moisture, climate and tree growth; drainage; cultivation; regeneration; artificial; natural; stability of crops; ecology ; forest genetics; forest pathology; forest entomology; mammals and birds; statistics; research workshop; photography; publications; research information; planning and economics; work study; timber utilisation development.

Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission at universities and other institutions
- Nutrition experiments in forest nurseries
- Research on forest soils and tree nutrition
- Conifer seedling pathology
- Biology of the fungus crumenula sororia
- Virus diseases of forest trees
- Studies on insect viruses
- Research on the green spruce aphid, elatobium abietinum
- Studies on tit and pine looper moth populations at Culbin Forest
- Fish populations in forest streams
- Environmental studies
- Environmental factors and the growth of Sitka spruce
- Hydrological relations of forest and moorland vegetation
- Fires in forest and heathland fuels

150 x 240mm | 225 pages | black and white
11-710108-7
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1969
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1961
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1959. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part i Reports of work carried out by Forestry Commission research staff
-Forest tree seed investigations
-Nursery investigations
-Silvicultural investigations in the forest: (a) south and central England and Wales (b) Scotland and northern England
-Provenance studies
-Poplars and elms
-Forest ecology
-Forest soils
-Forest genetics
-Forest pathology
-Forest entomology
-Grey squirrel research
-Forest management
-Forest economics
-Design and analysis of experiments
-Machinery research
-Utilization development
-The library and photographic collection

Part ii Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions
-Researches in mycorrhiza
-Studies in soil mycology IV
-Forest soils research in Scotland
-Soil faunal investigations
-The juvenility problem in woody plants
-Relationship between larch canker and trichoscyphella willkommii
-Shelterbelt research
-Soil faunal research
-Studies on the morphological variation of conifers
-Hydrological relations of forest stands
-Tracheid length in young conifers
-Protein-fixing constituents of plants: part ii
-Further studies on fomes annosus
-Utilisation of tan barks
-Nutrition of trees in forest nurseries

Part iii Reports on results of individual investigations
-A summary of ten years seed testing experience with western
-Hemlock, tsuga heterophylla
-The use of herbicides for controlling vegetation in forest fire breaks and uncropped land
-The drainage of a heavy clay site
-Experimental introductions of alternative species into pioneer crops on poor sites
-Pruning of conifers by disbudding
-The pine looper moth, bupalus piniarius, in rendlesham and sherwood forests— 1959
-Propagation of elms and poplars from summerwood cuttings
-Estimating yield of hardwood coppice for pulpwood growing
150 x 240mm | 230 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1960
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1960
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1959. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part i - Reports of work carried out by Forestry Commission research staff
-Forest tree seed investigations
-Nursery investigations
-Silvicultural investigations in the forest: (a) south and central England and Wales (b) Scotland and -north England
-Provenance studies
-Poplars and elms
-Forest ecology
-Forest soils
-Forest genetics
-Forest pathology
-Forest entomology
-Grey squirrel control
-Forest management—introduction
-Working plans
-Forest economics
-Studies of growth and yield
-Census of woodlands
-Design and analysis of experiments
-Utilisation development
-Machinery research
-The library and photographic collection

Part ii Research undertaken for the Forestry commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions
-Researches in mycorrhiza and soil mycology
-Studies in soil mycology
-Soil fauna research
-Forest soils research in Scotland
-Substances in leaves affecting the decomposition of litter
-Studies on the physiology of flowering in forest trees
-The relationship between larch canker and the fungus trichoscyphella willkommii
-Further studies on the fungus fomes annosus
-Relation of fomes annosus incidence to soil and forest management in East Anglian pine plantations
-Shelterbelt research
-Researches on the tannin content of the stembark of Sitka spruce and Douglas fir

Part iii Results of individual investigations
-Effects of different forms and amounts of basic slag and phosphate on the growth of Japanese larch planted on blanket bog
-Summary of recent research into phosphate and potash manuring of conifers in nursery seedbeds in Scotland and northern England
-Summary of recent research into nitrogen manuring of conifers in nursery seedbeds in Scotland and northern England
-Experiments on the handling of poplar planting stock
-Resurvey of distribution of the bark beetle ips cembrae
-Studies of the indumentum of young shoots of Norway spruce

150 x 240mm | 204 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1959
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1954
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1953. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part i: Work carried out by forestry commission staff
-Forest tree seed investigations
-Experimental work in nurseries
-Silvicultural investigations in the forest
-Rhododendron ponticum in British woodlands
-Survey of tree growth on colliery spoil heaps
-Investigations into damage by the gale of January 31st, 1953,
-Silvicultural experiments on poplars
-Varietal trials and other work on poplars
-Forest genetics
-Studies of growth and yield
-The control and avoidance of forest tree diseases
-Forest entomology
-Machinery research
-Utilisation development
-The library and documentation centre at Alice Holt
-Photography
-Publications

Part ii: Research undertaken for the forestry commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions
-Nutrition problems in forest nurseries, summary
-Report for 1952
-Partial sterilisation of soil for disease control
-Researches in soil mycology
-Effect of tree growth on soil profile development
-Growth and nutrition of spruce and pine in heathland
-Plantations
-The forest ecology of acid soils
-The physical and chemical properties of forest soils
-Soil faunal investigations
-The relationship between larch canker and trichoscyphella willkommii
-The biology of cryptostroma corticale and the
-Sooty bark disease of sycamore
-Megastigmus seedflies infesting conifer seed
-Studies of variation in conifers

150 x 240mm | 140 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1953
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1953
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1952. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part i: work carried out by Forestry Commission staff

- Forest tree seed investigations
- Experimental work in nurseries
- Work on problems of afforestation in Scotland and northern England
- The 1945 broom and pine nursing experiments at Coldharbour, Wareham forest, Dorset
- Investigations in to the rehabilitation of derelict woodlands
- Experimental work on establishing hard woods in Scotland
- Chemical control of woody weed growth
- Chemical killing of trees to facilitate bark removal
- Provenance studies
- Forest ecology
- Forest genetics
- Establishment of poplars
- Studies of growth and yield
- Forest pathology
- Forest entomology
- Machinery research utilisation development
- Library and documentation
- Photography
- Publications

Part ii: research undertaken for the Forestry Commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions

- Sub-committee on nutrition problems in forest nurseries, summary report on 1951 experiments
- Effect of partial sterilisation by steam or formalin on damping-off of Sitka spruce seedlings in an old forest nursery
- Research into the physical and chemical properties of forest soils
- The influence of tree growth on soil profile development
- Growth and nutrition in heathland plantations
- Researches in soil mycology
- Morphological variations in coniferous species
- A study of the natural pinewoods of Scotland
- Soil faunal investigations
- Research on megastigmus insects infesting conifer seed
- The nesting of tit mice in boxes
- Studies on the relationship between larch canker and trichoscyphella willkomii
150 x 240mm | 148 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1952
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1952
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1951. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part 1: Work carried out by the Forestry Commission staff:

- Forest tree seed investigations
- Experimental work in nurseries
- Natural regeneration of scots pine woods in the highlands
- Position of planting on ploughed heathland
- Provenance studies
- Work on afforestation problems in Scotland and northern England, 1950-51
- Oak and larch mixtures at the early pole stage
- Survey of plantations on open cast iron stone mining areas in the midlands
- Derelict woodland investigations
- Influence of shade on the height growth and habit of beech
- Climate and soil in relation to beech growth in Britain
- Chemical control of woody weed growth
- Effect of high pruning on bark-peeling costs in Douglas fir
- Forest genetics
- Persistence of late-flushing characters in Norway and Sitka spruce
- Poplars and poplar cultivation
- Studies of growth and yield
- Census of woodlands
- Tree diseases in Great Britain, 1950-51. a general review
- Forest entomology
- Machinery research
- Photography
- Library and documentation work
- Publications

Part 2: Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions:

- Sub-committee on nutrition problems in forest nurseries—summary report on 1950 experiments
- Researches in soil mycology
- Influence of tree growth on soil profile development
- Mineral nutrient studies in heathland plantations
- Research into the physical and chemical properties of forest soils
- Soil faunal investigations
- Botanical studies of the variation in certain conifer species
- Investigations on fomes annosus in East Anglian pine plantations
- Effect of partial sterilisation on the fungal flora of an old forest nursery soil
- Megastigmus insects attacking conifer seeds
- Nesting of titmice in boxes, 1950

150 x 240mm | 54 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1951
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1951
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1950. The report includes:

Introduction
Summary of the year’s work

Part 1: Work carried out by Forestry Commission staff:

Forest tree seed investigations
Experimental work in the nursery
Nursery extension experiments at Radnor forest
Experiments in planting on upland heaths
Plantations on peatlands
Derelict woodland investigations
Provenance studies
Spacing of oak in plantations
Spacing experiments in conifers
Studies of growth and yield
Forest ecology
Forest pathology
Forest entomology
Machinery research
Library and documentation work
Photographic section
Publications

Part 2: Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions:

Sub -committee on nutrition problems in forest nurseries — summary report on 1949 experiments
Microbiological investigations and work on composts
Effect of partial sterilisation on the occurrence of fungi in the soil
Investigations on the fauna of forest humus layers
Soil faunal investigations
Research into the physical and chemical properties of forest soils
Nutrient uptake of conifers
Ecological studies on calluna heaths
Ecological studies in pine plantations
Botanica studies of variation in certain conifer species
Fomes annosus in East Anglian pine plantations
Ornithological investigations in forests

150 x 240mm | 138 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1950
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1950
The report of Forest Research for the year ending March 1949. The report includes:

Part 1: Work carried out by Forestry Commission staff:
Introduction
Studies of growth
Pathology
Entomology
Genetics
Forest ecology
The treatment of seed
Experimental work in the nursery
Afforestation of peat
Planting experiments on lowland heaths
Provenance studies
Arboreta and forest gardens
The library at Alice Holt
Publications

Part 2: Committee on nutrition problems in forest nurseries

Part 3: Research undertaken for the Forestry Commission by workers attached to universities and other institutions:
Introduction
Soil faunal investigations
Research into the physical and chemical properties of forest soils
Forest soil investigations in Scotland
Researches in soil mycology
Investigations on fomes annosus attacks in East Anglian pine plantations
Botanical studies on tree races
Forest ornithological investigations

150 x 240mm | 85 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1949
Report on Forest Research
Forestry Commission
1924
The annual reports of Forest Research for the year 1923-1924 which includes:

- Nursery and plantation experiments (Scotland, England and Wales).
- Permanent sample plots.
(i) Growth of Scots and Corsican pine seedlings.
(ii) Germination of seed.
- Comparative growth of Norway and Sitka spruce seedlings in ordinary and peaty soils.
- Peat Investigations(chemical and physical effect on growth of trees)
- Fungus diseases in nurseries and plantations.
- Insect pests in nurseries and plantations.
- Investigation of the Larch hybrid.

0
Free
Stock code:FCRFR_1923-1924
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Whats of Interest

Please direct orders to:
Forestry Commission Publications (CST)
Chetham House
Bird Hall Lane
Cheadle Heath
Cheshire, SK3 0ZP

T: 0161 495 4845
F: 0161 495 4840
E: forestry@theapsgroup.com