Forestry Commission logo

Results

Your query returned 19 results.

UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard.

This epub summary of the UK Forestry Standard, designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, provides a checklist of the Requirements and Guidelines for General Forestry Practice and each of the sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

An ePub version of the full UKFS is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (ePub)

ebook
978-0-85538-998-7
Free
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard. Guidelines on how to meet the requirements are set out in sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

This ePub has been designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. A printable pdf version is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (pdf)

eBook
978-0-085538-999-4
Free
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
This guide will help forest managers and agents in Scotland decide the best future management option for afforested deep peat sites (defined here as soils with a peat layer of 50 cm or more). It explains the principles and assessment methods of the 'Forestry on peatland habitats' supplementary guidance that Forestry Commission Scotland published in 2014 to support the FC Guideline Note 'Forests and Peatland Habitats' (2000).
A4 | 25 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-927-7
Free
Stock code:FCPG104
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2015
The proportion of open space in many forests and woodlands is increasing as forest management plans are implemented and forests are restructured. Landowners and forest managers are increasingly being encouraged to manage this ground for biodiversity objectives but in some situations the management of open ground may be more complex and challenging than the management of the forests themselves. This Practice Guide provides information and guidance to forest managers on managing open ground in upland forests. The guidance covers planning open habitats in new forests, creating open habitats in existing forests and maintaining open habitat networks. The Guide sets out both general principles and guidance for specific habitats together with advice on monitoring.
A4 | colour | 44 pages
978-0-85538-913-0
£10.00
Stock code:FCPG024
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Atmospheric pollution in the form of acid deposition has been dramatically reduced since international controls on emissions were introduced in the 1980s. However, acidification still affects acid-sensitive regions of the UK, damaging fisheries and causing adverse ecological changes in freshwaters. Forestry is known to influence the degree of acidification, principally due to the ability of forest canopies to capture more acid sulphur and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. As a result, there is a need to manage forestry within vulnerable areas to ensure that it does not lead to increased acidification or delay the recovery of waters to Good Ecological Status. This Practice Guide describes the measures that can be taken to minimise adverse impacts and provides a methodology for determining whether new planting, restocking or felling proposals could pose a risk to freshwaters. It includes maps showing the locations of vulnerable areas and decision trees to guide those involved with woodland creation or the felling and restocking of existing forests in affected areas through the steps of catchment-based critical load and site impact assessments.

Digital maps showing catchments vulnerable to acidification are also available online.

A4 | colour | 32 pages
978-0-85538-911-6
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG023
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Forest management plans are the key reference documents for monitoring and assessing forests and forestry practice in Britain. They define and communicate forest and woodland management proposals, set out how sustainable forest management is to be achieved and describe the consequences of management activities over time. Forest management planning involves assembling and integrating a wide range of information about a site and its potential, and a number of established design techniques are available to assist with this process. This Practice Guide provides step-by-step guidance to the techniques that can be used at each of the seven planning stages. The guidance applies to both the creation of new forests and woodlands and the management of existing forests and woodlands. It is aimed at forest and woodland owners and managers, forestry practitioners and all those involved in forest planning and the preparation of forest management plans. The Guide will also help those evaluating and approving plans and proposals, such as regulatory staff involved in grants and licences, and others with an interest in forestry consultation.

The Practice Guide is supported by a number of worked examples that show the development of the forest management planning process for typical landscape types found across the UK. The landscapes in these examples vary in scale and they serve to illustrate appropriate design techniques for different landscape types, as far as the development of the final sketch design.

A4 | 64 pages | colour
978-0-85538-894-2
£14.00
Stock code:FCPG012
Practice Guide
Jonathan W Humphrey, Sallie Bailey
2012
Deadwood is a vital component of a properly functioning forest ecosystem. It plays an important role in sustaining biodiversity and in delivering ecosystem services such as soil formation and nutrient cycling. In the UK up to a fifth of woodland species depend on dead or dying trees for all or part of their life cycle and many of these species are rare or threatened. This Practice Guide has been written for the owners and managers of forests and woodlands who want to increase the value of their woodlands for biodiversity. It provides advice and practical guidance on managing deadwood to support sustainable forest management and the UK Forestry Standard Guidelines on Forests and Biodiversity.
A4 | 24 pages | colour
978-0-85538-857-7
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG020
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2012
Diversity in forests is essential to conserve biodiversity and expand habitats, and to contribute towards enhancing landscape quality and recreation opportunities. In addition, introducing species and age diversity throughout a forest can increase their resilience to pests, diseases and fire, and extend economic opportunities.
This Practice Guide offers advice and ideas from which a forest manager may select options that meet their management objectives and are appropriate for their forest. The format of the guidance relates to the decisions which forest managers need to make when they are preparing fully integrated management proposals which will contribute to a Forest Plan.
A4 | 40 pages | colour
978-0-85538-859-1
£5.00
Stock code:FCPG103
Practice Guide
I Willoughby
2004
UK Government and European policy is to minimise pesticide use as far as possible. Covering pest, disease, vegetation and wildlife management, and based upon the latest research, Reducing Pesticide Use in Forestry can help forestry practitioners to assess the impact of any problem and select a non-chemical solution. Two simple flowcharts summarise the decision process and link to comprehensive reference material in the rest of the guide. If pesticide use is unavoidable, the guide should help managers to keep chemical use to the minimum level necessary consistent with good practice while at the same time reducing the risk of damage to the environment.
Spare copies of Decision Recording Sheet and the Optional Decision Aid [to assist in balancing the possible non-target effects of pesticides] are available to download here as pdf files:
Decision recording sheet
Optional decision aid
A4 | 140 pages | full colour
0855386177
£16.00
Stock code:FCPG015
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385871
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG008
Practice Guide
Andy J Moffat
1997
This guide provides operational guidance to managers on the potential impacts of whole-tree harvesting upon the forest ecosystem. It also considers the likely risks on different sites and makes recommendations for managers faced with different harvesting options.
A4 | 12 pages | full colour
0855383607
£5.00
Stock code:FCPG011
Technical Note
Alan Dickerson, Bruce Nicoll, Mike Perks
2013
The management of forests and woodlands requires an effective road network to provide access for the machinery required to plant and harvest trees and extract timber and wood products. Roads are also used by visitors for access and activities such as cycling and mountain biking. Forest roads and bridges must be constructed so that they are fit for purpose and robust enough to cope with intensive forest operations. However, building and maintaining road networks uses energy and releases carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – from the disturbance of soil for new roads and the quarrying of materials to the emissions from construction vehicles. It is important that these emissions are reduced wherever possible by following good practice in construction and by minimising soil disturbance, especially on sites with peaty soils. This Technical Note describes how the greenhouse gas release from forest civil engineering operations can be controlled and reduced, while still ensuring the development and maintenance of a robust forest road network. It is aimed at forest civil engineers, planners, managers and owners.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-891-1
Free
Stock code:FCTN020
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2007
A4 | 4 pages | 2 colour
978-0-85538-741-9
Free
Stock code:FCTN017
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2006
A4 leaflet
0855387017
Free
Stock code:FCTN014
Practice Note
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | colour
085538686X
Free
Stock code:FCPN013
Technical Note
Andy Hall
2005
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386819
Free
Stock code:FCTN009
Technical Note
Ian R Murgatroyd
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386835
Free
Stock code:FCTN011
UKFS Guideline Note
Gordon S Patterson
2000
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385286
Free
Stock code:FCGN001

Managing Native Broadleaved Woodland

Management handbook
Ralph Harmer, Gary Kerr, Richard Thompson
2010

Native woodlands occupy an important place in both our countryside and cultural heritage. They are managed to provide timber and other wood products but nowadays are often equally valued as habitats for wildlife and areas for recreation. The aim of this handbook is to provide advice that will help owners and managers understand and manage native broadleaved woodlands. A wide variety of subjects are covered, from identifying woodland communities and management planning, to silvicultural techniques, nature conservation and vegetation management – including the use of grazing animals. The background and principles of each topic are explained and case studies are used throughout. Interactions between site characteristics and historic management are also considered in relation to future management options. The handbook also highlights the questions that managers should ask, when considering management options for their woodlands, that take account of location, site characteristics and objectives.

Please note this publication is only available to buy from TSO
T: +44 (0)870 600 5522
W: www.tsoshop.co.uk

B5 book | 510 pages | colour
978-0-11-497344-5
£30
Stock code:FCBK003
View all publications


Adobe Reader download badge
Most publications can be downloaded and viewed on desktop computers using Adobe Reader. You can download Adobe Reader here.

Adobe Digital Editions download badge
Some publications are available in ePub format for use on mobile devices such as smart phones or tablets. To view ePub documents on desktop computers you can download Adobe Digital Editions here.

Whats of Interest

Please direct orders to:
Forestry Commission Publications (CST)
Chetham House
Bird Hall Lane
Cheadle Heath
Cheshire, SK3 0ZP

T: 0161 495 4845
F: 0161 495 4840
E: forestry@theapsgroup.com