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UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard.

This epub summary of the UK Forestry Standard, designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, provides a checklist of the Requirements and Guidelines for General Forestry Practice and each of the sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

An ePub version of the full UKFS is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (ePub)

ebook
978-0-85538-998-7
Free
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard. Guidelines on how to meet the requirements are set out in sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

This ePub has been designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. A printable pdf version is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (pdf)

eBook
978-0-085538-999-4
Free
Practice Guide
Aileen Shackell, Robin Walter
2012
The guidance set out in this Practice Guide represents a step forward in our thinking about the benefits of the outdoors for health and well-being. It aims to inspire everyone involved with outdoor spaces in healthcare settings to think how they could be used for therapeutic purposes. Focusing on outdoor spaces across the NHS estate, the guidance is relevant to the full range of facilities, from the largest hospital to the smallest health centre. It also has a wider application wherever health and well-being is important, for example in places such as care homes and special schools. The Guide has been designed to be accessible to a non-technical audience, and will be of interest to those engaged with policy, and everyone interested in improving patient care – whether they deal directly with patients, or focus on grounds management. It will act as a good introduction for those new to the field, but many professionals already working in ‘therapeutic landscapes’ will also find it of interest.
A4 | 76 pages | colour
978-0-85538-853-9
£13.50
Stock code:FCPG019
Practice Guide
David Lonsdale
2000
This Practice Guide indicates the responsibilities of owners and managers for assessing the risk of hazards from trees, and considers what inspection procedures might be appropriate. Preventative care of young trees and methods of protecting trees from wildlife damage are described. Details of tree hazards, signs of their occurrence, and options for remedial work are presented.
A4 | 28 pages | 2 colour
0855385146
£7.00
Stock code:FCPG013
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
1996
A5 | 36 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855382716
Free
Stock code:FCPG010
Research Note
Bianca Ambrose-Oji, Gail Atkinson, Michal Petr
2019
Government policy across the UK seeks to encourage woodland owners, both commercial and non-commercial, to implement resilient management of their forests and woodlands. However, there are significant barriers to the uptake of resilient forestry practice, for instance, uncertainty about the efficacy of action, the costs involved, and the perceived difficulty in doing things differently. By presenting data from an evidence review, a national survey, workshops and semi-structured interviews, this Research Note provides an investigation into private woodland owners’ and managers’ understanding of resilience in regard to forest and woodland management in the UK. It describes the four different components of resilience, resistance, recovery, adaptation and transformation, and explains how each could be linked to management decision-making, planning and implementation of resilience actions. Categorising different kinds of woodland manager, reveals the motivations and preferences which influence each type, and how they conceive resilience differently depending on their beliefs, management objectives, their understanding of forest ecology, and perceptions of risk and uncertainty. The results show changing management practice relies on providing relevant information in a way which impacts owners’ and managers’ beliefs and responses to uncertainty. Future knowledge-transfer strategies must tailor advice specifically for each type of woodland manager.
A4 | 10 pages | online only
978-0-85538-983-3
Free
Stock code:FCRN036
Research Note
Madalena Vaz Monteiro, Phillip Handley, James I.L. Morison, Kieron J. Doick
2019
Cities and towns are often affected by the urban heat island effect, whereby air temperatures are higher than those in surrounding rural environments. This Research Note describes the negative impact that elevated urban temperatures can have on human thermal comfort and health and how urban green infrastructure can help lessen this impact. Drawing on recent research, two particular aspects of green infrastructure are explored. Firstly, the cooling effectiveness of urban greenspaces is examined. Secondly, the role urban trees play in providing cooling and the factors that may influence this benefit are highlighted. This Note gives examples of how the urban environment can limit cooling from vegetation, and provides guidance as to how these limitations can be reduced. Current scientific knowledge of strategies to maximise cooling and the extent to which this knowledge is being translated into practice are discussed as are the measures which have been adopted to help value this benefit. In light of climate change, the need for cooling by trees and greenspaces is expected to increase even in temperate climates such as that of the UK. Green infrastructure planning and development should embrace greenspace design and tree placement that facilitate such cooling, as well as include tree species with high cooling ability and ensure they are provided with enough space and resource to grow and function. Further research on the design strategies that lead to maximum cooling is required. Communication between researchers, practitioners and policymakers should be strengthened.
A4 | 12 pages | online only
978-0-85538-984-0
Free
Stock code:FCRN037
Practice Note
James Ogilvie, Kevin Lafferty
2013
Forests and woodlands bring wide-ranging and diverse benefits to people in Scotland. They are ideal places for people of all ages to participate in leisure, recreation and sports. However, forests are also workplaces. Forestry is an important part of the rural economy, and the production of timber provides revenue for landowners and jobs for the forestry sector and related businesses. Harvesting and haulage operations have been expanding over the past few years, as the forests that were established last century reach maturity, and so the need to balance woodland access with the need for safety during forest operations has never been more important. This is both to comply with health and safety legislation and fulfil land access obligations. Managing woodland access and forest operations is a pragmatic and practical process, involving land managers and access authorities, so that forest operations can take place safely, with minimal disruption to public access and recreational users. This Practice Note sets out clear steps to achieve this aim, including advice on early engagement with stakeholders and careful planning of operations. It is aimed at landowners and managers, forestry practitioners and operators, access authorities and recreation bodies.
A4 | colour | 8 pages
978-0-85538-893-5
Free
Stock code:FCPN104
Practice Note
Forestry Commission
2013
Everyone involved in forestry work has health and safety duties and responsibilities. This Practice Note provides guidance to help landowners, forest managers and forestry practitioners manage public safety on harvesting sites. Forest operations are high-risk activities, and the management issues involved in harvesting and hauling timber while maintaining public access to forests and woodlands can be complex. There are a number of tasks that have to be undertaken – both during planning and while carrying out operations – to ensure that people’s health and safety is not put at risk. This Note sets out the different roles and responsibilities for managing public safety to ensure that activities on and around harvesting worksites are co-ordinated and the right tasks are carried out by the right people. It provides information and advice on suitable control measures and illustrates good practice through the use of scenarios. The guidance was first published in 2001 by the Forestry and Arboriculture Safety Training Council (FASTCo).

Users in Northern Ireland should follow the specific guidance in the Forest Service Practice Note Managing public safety on forestry worksites

A4 | colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-876-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN019
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Please direct orders to:
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