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Your query returned 892 results.

Annual Report
Forestry Commisison
Owing to war-time difficulties this report was not published.
155 x 245mm | 54 pages | balck and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1942
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
Owing to war-time difficulties this report was not published.
155 x 245mm | 52 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1941
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
Owing to war-time difficulties this report was not published.
155 x 245mm | 54 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1939
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
Owing to war-time difficulties this report was not published.
155 x 245mm | 47 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1940
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
Owing to war-time difficulties, this report was not published.
247 x 350mm | 52 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1943
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard.

This epub summary of the UK Forestry Standard, designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, provides a checklist of the Requirements and Guidelines for General Forestry Practice and each of the sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

An ePub version of the full UKFS is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (ePub)

ebook
978-0-85538-998-7
Free
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard. Guidelines on how to meet the requirements are set out in sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

This ePub has been designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. A printable pdf version is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (pdf)

eBook
978-0-085538-999-4
Free
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Helen Davies, Kieron Doick, Phillip Handley, Liz O'Brien, Jeffrey Wilson
2017
This Research Report looks at a broad range of urban forest-based ecosystem services and disservices and, using a literature review, links their provision with four aspects of urban forests (physical scale, physical structure and context in terms of location and proximity to people and land use and ownership). A key objective of this report is to illustrate the specific role of trees in delivering benefit to society, as opposed to delivery being assigned to green infrastructure in general, or to a particular greenspace type. Four scale-based urban forest elements are considered: single tree, line of trees, tree cluster and woodland. The ecosystem services are grouped into provisioning, regulating and cultural, and in the main part of the report each service is considered in turn, with in most cases a table summarising the urban forest parameters that are reported in the literature to improve that service. A summary table is provided which brings together delivery indicators for urban forest ecosystem service provision. The report then considers ecosystem disservices in a similar way. Such information will be helpful for mapping and quantifying ecosystem service delivery over a given area and for determining how and where the urban forest can be bolstered in support of ecosystem service provision, including a reduction in ecosystem disservices. To this end, synergies and trade-offs in ecosystem service delivery are also considered. By revealing which component parts of the urban forest are frequently associated with the benefit, the report can help policymakers and urban forest practitioners in Britain make informed decisions on how to improve the long-term and sustainable delivery of ecosystem services for a more resilient society.
A4 | 36 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-953-6
Free
Stock code:FCRP026
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Amy Binner, Greg Smith, Ian Bateman, Brett Day, Matthew Agarwala, Amii Harwood
2017
Woodlands and trees have a wide-ranging role in the economy but this is often under-valued in conventional economic indicators. For example, woodlands deliver social and environmental benefits – such as outdoor access, biodiversity and carbon sequestration – which are largely unpriced in economic transactions but which have important impacts on the economy and on society’s welfare. This review provides an overview of existing knowledge and evidence on the social and environmental outputs of forestry in Britain and identifies priorities for future research. It uses the concept of the ‘natural factory’ to explain how natural assets such as woodlands contribute to different economic production processes. It evaluates underpinning scientific research, economic valuation evidence, and provides a separate assessment for urban trees and woodlands. It also examines evidence needs relating to key developments in economic thinking and practice including natural capital accounting and a new generation of integrated decision support tools. Despite a substantial extant body of evidence, further research is needed to fill significant gaps in knowledge in order for the full economic contribution of woodlands to be understood.

A summary based on the full review is also available to download as a Research Note.

A4 | 120 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-955-0
Free
Stock code:FCRP027
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2016
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2016 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-949-9
Free
Stock code:FCFS216
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Ivor Davies
2016
Timber is a versatile and high performance construction material that can be produced in most parts of the UK. This second edition of ‘Sustainable construction timber’ has been written to help building designers and contractors source and specify local timber products. The report explains why local sourcing of timber is important, reviews the range of timber species and products currently obtainable in the UK and explores the ways in which local sourcing can be achieved within a construction project. Sustainable construction timber is applicable to designers and contractors wanting to source and specify UK grown timber products, people considering using their own timber on a construction project and those involved in building refurbishment or conservation.
A4 | 56 pages | colour
978-0-85538-945-1
£13.00
Stock code:FCRP025

Forest Yield: A PC-based yield model for forest management in Britain

Software
Robert W. Matthews, Paul A. Henshall, Thomas A.R. Jenkins, Ewan D. Mackie
2016
Forest Yield is a PC-based yield model for forest management in Britain. The software provides the user with estimates of various aspects of tree growth, for a range of tree species, yield classes and management prescriptions. The software and user manual are supported by a handbook on forest growth and yield tables, for those who would like to know more about the theory underpinning yield modelling. Forest Yield will be of use to forest and woodland managers and practitioners, researchers and students.

For more information about Forest Yield go to: www.forestry.gov.uk/forestyield

Software
978-0-85538-941-3
£50 + VAT
Stock code:FCSW002
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2016
Published by HMSO, for the period ended 31 March 1969.
155 x 244mm | 105 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1969

Forest GALES: A wind risk decision support tool for forest management in Britain

Software
Bruce Nicoll, Sophie Hale, Barry Gardiner, Andrew Peace, Bill Rayner, Juan Suarez, Stephen Bathgate, Mark Brady.
2015
Wind damage is a major challenge for the management of forests in Britain, and it has economic, environmental and social consequences. In some areas the threat of wind damage restricts silvicultural options and leads to the use of shortened rotations, giving lower income from timber sales. In order to minimise risk, forest managers need information on the likely timing and magnitude of damage so that they are able to predict the level of risk and assess the implications of different management options. Forest GALES draws together more than 30 years of knowledge and research into a user-friendly decision support tool that will enable forest managers to estimate the probability of wind damage to conifer stands in Britain. The software calculates the wind speed that would be expected to damage a stand of trees and it provides windiness scores (DAMS) for the whole of Britain. It assesses the current level of risk of overturning and stem breakage, and the change in risk over the lifetime of the crop, in addition to assessing the effect on risk of thinning and the creation of brown edges. Forest GALES is able to calculate the risk to any number of stands simultaneously.

For more information about Forest GALES go to: www.forestry.gov.uk/forestgales

Software
978-0-85538-932-1
£50 + VAT
Stock code:FCSW001
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2015
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2015 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-931-4
Free
Stock code:FCFS215
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2015
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 89 pages | black and white
978-1-4741-2037-1
Free
Stock code:FCAR015
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
This guide will help forest managers and agents in Scotland decide the best future management option for afforested deep peat sites (defined here as soils with a peat layer of 50 cm or more). It explains the principles and assessment methods of the 'Forestry on peatland habitats' supplementary guidance that Forestry Commission Scotland published in 2014 to support the FC Guideline Note 'Forests and Peatland Habitats' (2000).
A4 | 25 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-927-7
Free
Stock code:FCPG104
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Andrew Price
2015
Shake (internal splitting of the wood in a growing tree) is believed to affect and devalue around one-fifth of British oak crops. There is currently no fully reliable method to identify the defect in standing trees, or to predict vulnerable sites and stands without local knowledge and historical data. Shake may appear on any site, even those with the fewest natural hazards. The purpose of this review is to enable the riskiest sites to be identified and avoided for new planting and to help lower risk sites be managed in order to minimise their potential for shake.
A4 | 28 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-925-3
Free
Stock code:FCRP024
Annual Report
Forest Research
2015
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 74 pages | colour
978-1-4741-1725-8
Free
Stock code:FRAR015
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
Recumbent Stone Circles: a learning resource for teachers of Curriculum for Excellence Level 2. This resource aims to help teachers and youth group leaders explore the recumbent stone circles of Aberdeenshire.
A4 | 52 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-922-2
Free
Stock code:FCMS130
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
The Picts: a learning resource for teachers of Curriculum for Excellence Level 2. The Picts are one of Scotland's greatest mysteries: an apparently vanished nation, chronicled by others but not by themselves. The Picts speak to us only through their inspiring creativity- their marvellous carved stones, their monumental hill forts and their beautiful jewellery. This resource aims to provide an introduction to a topic rich in imagination, creativity and enquiry.
A4 | 76 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-923-9
Free
Stock code:FCMS131
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
The National Forest Estate is one of Scotland's greatest assets, providing economic, social and environmental benefits to the people of Scotland, wherever they happen to live. Action for the Environment on Scotland's National Forest Estate describes just some of the recent work we have been doing to ensure that our natural and cultural heritage is protected, conserved and enhanced.
A4 | colour | 88 pages | online only
978-0-085538-921-5
Free
Stock code:FCMS129
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Darren Moseley, Norman Dandy, David Edwards, Gregory Valatin
2014
Evidence indicates that woodland creation is generally a cost-effective method of climate change mitigation, when compared with a range of alternatives. However, engaging landowners and land managers in woodland creation schemes can sometimes prove difficult, and this affects prospects for meeting national woodland planting targets and associated climate change mitigation objectives. Although reluctance to plant woodland is often attributed to the low financial attractiveness of such schemes, wider factors – including long-held cultural views on changing land use and perceptions of the urgency of tackling climate change – can also be important. Insights from behavioural economics indicate that individuals are influenced by a number of cognitive factors in making decisions and that certain ‘nudges’ may help direct choices in a particular direction. Nudges are ways of influencing people’s choices without limiting the options, or appreciably altering their relative costs. There is a range of nudge type approaches that could be used to encourage woodland creation for climate change mitigation. These include addressing perceived barriers to woodland creation, encouraging private woodland creation by highlighting successes and by the public sector leading by example. Implementation of nudge type approaches should be tailored towards different types of landowners and land managers, who may vary in their attitudes, motivations and willingness to plant trees.

Related Research Note - Behavioural policy 'nudges' to encourage woodland creation for climate change mitigation (FCRN018)

A4 | 28 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-918-5
Free
Stock code:FCRP023
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2015
The proportion of open space in many forests and woodlands is increasing as forest management plans are implemented and forests are restructured. Landowners and forest managers are increasingly being encouraged to manage this ground for biodiversity objectives but in some situations the management of open ground may be more complex and challenging than the management of the forests themselves. This Practice Guide provides information and guidance to forest managers on managing open ground in upland forests. The guidance covers planning open habitats in new forests, creating open habitats in existing forests and maintaining open habitat networks. The Guide sets out both general principles and guidance for specific habitats together with advice on monitoring.
A4 | colour | 44 pages
978-0-85538-913-0
£10.00
Stock code:FCPG024
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2015

Iùl beag air craobhan choilltean Is mar a chleachdas iad

Gheibhear san iùl bheag seo fiosrachadh air na diofar chraobhan a lorgas ann an coilltean is air fearann-coillteach ann am Breatainn. Innsidh e mar a dh’aithnichear diofar ghnèithean cumanta agus cho cudromach ‘s a tha iad ann am beatha-làitheil dhaoine.

This Guide lets you find out more about the trees found in the forests and woodlands of Great Britain. It helps you identify some of the most common species and shows how important they are in our day-to-day lives.

To order hardcopies of this publication please contact Stòrlann on 01851 700880 or oifis@storlann.co.uk

Extended A2 folded to 1/3 A4 | 2 pages | colour
978-0-85538-920-8
Free
Stock code:FCMS120
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2014
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2014 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-914-7
Free
Stock code:FCFS214
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Atmospheric pollution in the form of acid deposition has been dramatically reduced since international controls on emissions were introduced in the 1980s. However, acidification still affects acid-sensitive regions of the UK, damaging fisheries and causing adverse ecological changes in freshwaters. Forestry is known to influence the degree of acidification, principally due to the ability of forest canopies to capture more acid sulphur and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. As a result, there is a need to manage forestry within vulnerable areas to ensure that it does not lead to increased acidification or delay the recovery of waters to Good Ecological Status. This Practice Guide describes the measures that can be taken to minimise adverse impacts and provides a methodology for determining whether new planting, restocking or felling proposals could pose a risk to freshwaters. It includes maps showing the locations of vulnerable areas and decision trees to guide those involved with woodland creation or the felling and restocking of existing forests in affected areas through the steps of catchment-based critical load and site impact assessments.

Digital maps showing catchments vulnerable to acidification are also available online.

A4 | colour | 32 pages
978-0-85538-911-6
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG023
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Forest management plans are the key reference documents for monitoring and assessing forests and forestry practice in Britain. They define and communicate forest and woodland management proposals, set out how sustainable forest management is to be achieved and describe the consequences of management activities over time. Forest management planning involves assembling and integrating a wide range of information about a site and its potential, and a number of established design techniques are available to assist with this process. This Practice Guide provides step-by-step guidance to the techniques that can be used at each of the seven planning stages. The guidance applies to both the creation of new forests and woodlands and the management of existing forests and woodlands. It is aimed at forest and woodland owners and managers, forestry practitioners and all those involved in forest planning and the preparation of forest management plans. The Guide will also help those evaluating and approving plans and proposals, such as regulatory staff involved in grants and licences, and others with an interest in forestry consultation.

The Practice Guide is supported by a number of worked examples that show the development of the forest management planning process for typical landscape types found across the UK. The landscapes in these examples vary in scale and they serve to illustrate appropriate design techniques for different landscape types, as far as the development of the final sketch design.

A4 | 64 pages | colour
978-0-85538-894-2
£14.00
Stock code:FCPG012
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2014
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 139 pages | black and white
978-1-4741-0803-4
Free
Stock code:FCAR014
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Wildfire events are predicted to increase in frequency in the UK due to increased land-use pressure and climate change. Wildfires can have a number of impacts on sustainable forest management and, in some extreme cases, may have devastating human and environmental consequences. Reducing the incidence and impact of wildfires in forests and woodlands through good management planning is important to protect the delivery of forest ecosystem goods and services. It can also help to prevent small wildfire incidents escalating into large-scale, out-of-control events. This Practice Guide supports the UK Forestry Standard by setting out good practice for building wildfire resilience into forest management planning. It describes the factors that can increase wildfire risk, sets out the planning measures that should be considered and outlines the forest management techniques that can be implemented to mitigate the risks to our forests and woodlands.

Wildfire risk assessment template for forests and woodlands

A4 | 52 pages | colour
978-0-85538-894-2
£11.00
Stock code:FCPG022
Annual Report
Forest Research
2014
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 61 pages | colour
978-1-4741-0331-2
Free
Stock code:FRAR014
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2014
The Tree Stories were created over a year and inspired by Highland Perthshire’s beautiful fauna and flora. Each story was created during the month with which its tree is linked in folklore.
A4 | 56 pages | colour
978-0-085538-904-8
Free
Stock code:FCMS128
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2014
The Strategic Timber Transport Fund (STTF) was introduced in 2005 to facilitate the sustainable transport of timber in rural areas of Scotland for the benefit of local communities and the environment, maximising the value of monies through innovative regionally and nationally strategic projects and partnerships. This publication covers how this has been done and includes examples of case studies.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-902-4
Free
Stock code:FCMS127
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2014
The original Woodland Workout was a Forest Education Initiative project supported by Forestry Commission Scotland.

The resource was developed by four teachers.

The aim of the project was to produce a resource that could easily be used by teachers and enable them to offer a wide range of outdoor activities and exercises to their pupils. The activities have been adapted from a wide range of sources, which may be found in the bibliography.

This in an updated version of the Woodland Workout.

For 2014 there are also special Commonwealth Games Activity sheets available.

Three related activity sheets are also available:

Commonwealth Games Activity sheets (PDF, 1.4MB)
Learning Activity sheets (PDF, 2.0MB)
Physical Activity sheets (PDF, 1.0MB)

More information is available from www.foresteducation.org

A6 | 20 pages | colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCMS112
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2013
Trees and the Scottish Enlightenment is an introduction to the Enlightenment and the beginnings of modern forestry. It tells the story of how Scottish forestry developed during a particular historical time period, known as the Enlightenment and in a particular sort of place, the Scottish country estate. The resource is for teachers of Curriculum for Excellence P6/7 S1/2.
A4 | 36 pages | colour
978-0-085538-895-6
Free
Stock code:FCMS125
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Darren Moseley, Gregory Valatin
2013
Ecosystem services refer to the benefits or outputs that people derive from ecosystems. Following the publication of the UK National Ecosystem Assessment there has been a growing interest in assessing the flows of such services and valuing the contribution they make to human well-being. This Research Report draws upon recent evidence (years 2001 to 2012) from the behavioural economics literature to examine how cognitive factors influencing people’s choices and preferences can affect the values that they place upon ecosystem services and upon ecosystem sustainability. The Report shows that there can be a wide variation in the values placed on particular ecosystem services due to a range of factors. For example, the ability of individuals to process information can result in eight times higher variance in respondent values when more complex formats are used. The Report covers methods used to mitigate these effects and highlights where addressing research gaps on how people value ecosystem services could contribute to ecosystem sustainability.
A4 | 24 pages | colour
978-0-085538-895-9
Free
Stock code:FCRP022
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission Scotland
2014
The Native Woodland Survey of Scotland (NWSS), carried out between 2006 and 2013 has provided the first authoritative picture of Scotland’s native woodlands. It used field survey to identify the location, type, extent, composition and condition of all native and nearly native woods, as well as woods planted on ancient woodland sites (PAWS). This report gives a national overview of results – more information on the survey, a woodland map and supporting datasets can be found at: Native Woodland Survey of Scotland.
A4 | colour | 100 pages
978-0-85538-899-7
Free
Stock code:FCMS126
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2013
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2013 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-892-8
Free
Stock code:FCFS213
Practice Guide
Ralph Harmer, Richard Thompson
2013
The restoration of plantations on ancient woodland sites (PAWS) to native woodland communities is a challenging objective that requires more management input than simply re-creating a stand of site native species. All sites differ, and optimising the choice of methods thorough site assessment is necessary before restoration starts. Where there is evidence of valuable remnants of the former ancient semi-natural woodland within the stand, management should secure their future, and promote their development and subsequent contribution to the future native woodland. This Guide provides a framework for selecting a method of stand management and advice on good practice that is appropriate for a particular site and related to the quality of the remnant features present.
A4 | 28 pages | colour
978-0-85538-885-1
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG021
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2013
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 147 pages | black and white
978-0-10-298250-3
£24.50
Stock code:FCAR013
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2013
Imagining Mesolithic life in Scotland's forests and woodlands: an outdoor learning resource for teachers of Curriculum for Excellence Level 2. This resource has been produced to support teachers who are reading the novel Wolf Brother by Michelle Paver with their classes. Set in Mesolithic times, the novel is not only an exciting read but also reveals much about the lives of hunter-gatherers who lived in Scotland 10,000 years ago.

Three posters are available to accompany the booklet: 'Coastal poster' (FCMS123A); 'The Raven camp' (FCMS123B) and 'Every part of the deer' (FCMS123C)
A4 | 56 pages | colour
978-0-085538-884-3
Free
Stock code:FCMS123
Annual Report
Forest Research
2013
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 68 pages | colour
978-0-10-295252-0
£16.00
Stock code:FRAR013
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Vadims Sarajevs
2012
A substantial body of literature, including government policies, acknowledges the important role of greenspace in sustainable development and the creation of attractive and economically vibrant communities. Greenspace refers to the natural environmental components (green and blue spaces) that lie within and between a region’s cities, towns and villages. This Research Report provides a critical review focusing on the most recent evidence (years 2000-2011), of the net economic benefits, both direct and indirect, of initiatives to create or improve greenspace. Despite some conflicting evidence, the Report shows that there is a growing body of research that confirms the benefits. For example, a large-scale study undertaken for the UK National Ecosystem Assessment showed that a percentage point increase in greenspace land use share in a Census ward increases property prices by around 1%. Both expansions of broadleaved woodland and of coniferous woodland were found to have positive effects, with the impact of the former greater than the latter. The Report also highlights gaps in research providing robust estimates of net economic benefits.
A4 | 38 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-865-2
Free
Stock code:FCRP021
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2012
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2012 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-871-3
Free
Stock code:FCFS212
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Mariella Marzano, Norman Dandy
2012
Forests are popular places for recreation, but some activities can have negative impacts on wildlife. Land managers have to balance delivery of the social and economic benefits derived from outdoor recreation with nature conservation objectives. This literature review provides an overview of potential disturbance issues and a guide to the evidence on impacts from walking, cycling, horse riding, off-road vehicle use, camping, and other recreational activities that take place in forests. Greatest attention has been directed towards walking, and impacts on soils, vegetation and birdlife. Much of the literature focuses on the physical characteristics of disturbance but there is little social scientific analysis of recreational users, for example on how their values and awareness relate to disturbance, or wider social factors that influence where, when and whether impacts occur. An holistic approach to understanding and managing the interaction of recreation and forest wildlife is needed, which links ecological studies with social data.
A4 | 40 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-864-5
Free
Stock code:FCRP020
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gregory Valatin
2012
Comparing the cost-effectiveness of different climate change mitigation measures is essential in minimising the cost of meeting national greenhouse gas reduction targets. The costs of different measures and their potential to reduce emissions or sequester greenhouse gases can be depicted using a Marginal Abatement Cost Curve. Previous studies have shown that UK forestry measures are generally highly cost-effective by comparison with government estimates of the social value of carbon used in policy appraisal. However, estimates are sensitive to a range of factors including the species planted, forest management regime, environmental conditions, co-benefits and methodology adopted. This review provides a comparison of previous approaches and underlying assumptions, and summarises the current approach to cost-effectiveness analysis for policy appraisal and evaluation recommended in government guidance. It also provides recommendations for future studies.
A4 | 16 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-863-8
Free
Stock code:FCRP019
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
James Morison, Robert W Matthews
2012
Forests and woodlands represent a substantial stock of carbon that is contained in soil, trees and other vegetation. They are a key component of the global carbon cycle and their effective management, at both global and regional scales, is an important mechanism for reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Understanding what determines the size of forest and woodland carbon stocks, and the processes and controls on the exchanges of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, is critical in helping the forestry sector to contribute to reducing anthropogenic climate change. The objective of this review is to provide that understanding by summarising key information on carbon stocks in British forests, the fluxes of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, how these are affected by changes as trees grow, and how they are affected by forest operations and other forest management decisions. This report will be of interest to forest managers, policymakers and researchers involved in estimating and understanding forest carbon and greenhouse balances, particularly in British conditions, how the balances can be affected by management, and what the limitations are to our knowledge.
A4 | 149 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-855-3
Free
Stock code:FCRP018
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2012
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 154 pages | black and white
978-0-10-297647-2
£24.50
Stock code:FCAR012
Practice Guide
Jonathan W Humphrey, Sallie Bailey
2012
Deadwood is a vital component of a properly functioning forest ecosystem. It plays an important role in sustaining biodiversity and in delivering ecosystem services such as soil formation and nutrient cycling. In the UK up to a fifth of woodland species depend on dead or dying trees for all or part of their life cycle and many of these species are rare or threatened. This Practice Guide has been written for the owners and managers of forests and woodlands who want to increase the value of their woodlands for biodiversity. It provides advice and practical guidance on managing deadwood to support sustainable forest management and the UK Forestry Standard Guidelines on Forests and Biodiversity.
A4 | 24 pages | colour
978-0-85538-857-7
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG020
Annual Report
Forest Research
2012
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 67 pages | colour
978-0-10-295244-5
£16.00
Stock code:FRAR012
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2012
Diversity in forests is essential to conserve biodiversity and expand habitats, and to contribute towards enhancing landscape quality and recreation opportunities. In addition, introducing species and age diversity throughout a forest can increase their resilience to pests, diseases and fire, and extend economic opportunities.
This Practice Guide offers advice and ideas from which a forest manager may select options that meet their management objectives and are appropriate for their forest. The format of the guidance relates to the decisions which forest managers need to make when they are preparing fully integrated management proposals which will contribute to a Forest Plan.
A4 | 40 pages | colour
978-0-85538-859-1
£5.00
Stock code:FCPG103
Practice Guide
Aileen Shackell, Robin Walter
2012
The guidance set out in this Practice Guide represents a step forward in our thinking about the benefits of the outdoors for health and well-being. It aims to inspire everyone involved with outdoor spaces in healthcare settings to think how they could be used for therapeutic purposes. Focusing on outdoor spaces across the NHS estate, the guidance is relevant to the full range of facilities, from the largest hospital to the smallest health centre. It also has a wider application wherever health and well-being is important, for example in places such as care homes and special schools. The Guide has been designed to be accessible to a non-technical audience, and will be of interest to those engaged with policy, and everyone interested in improving patient care – whether they deal directly with patients, or focus on grounds management. It will act as a good introduction for those new to the field, but many professionals already working in ‘therapeutic landscapes’ will also find it of interest.
A4 | 76 pages | colour
978-0-85538-853-9
£13.50
Stock code:FCPG019
Miscellaneous
National Tree Safety Group
2011
This is one of three new publications that have been produced by the Forestry Commission for the National Tree Safety Group. The three documents provide guidance on trees and public safety in the UK for owners, managers and advisers.
Managing trees for safety is a leaflet for tree owners to help them understand the issues around tree safety and come to a balanced conclusion.

Other related documents are:
Common sense risk management of trees (FCMS024)
Common sense risk management of trees - landowner summary (FCMS025)
A4 landscape | colour | 4 pages
978-085538-842-3
Free
Stock code:FCMS026
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
Since Medieval times, designed landscapes have evolved and at times changed dramatically in style and character. Throughout all periods and recognised styles however, trees have been an essential feature. In the 20th century social and economic changes proved challenging times for land management, with a combination of estate fragmentation, decline and changed land-use policies, specifically regarding new objectives for forest expansion and management. Now designed landscapes are appreciated for their contribution to local landscape character and the distinctiveness of many of Scotland’s landscapes.
Today the challenge is to protect, restore and rejuvenate the remaining legacy, whilst ensuring arboricultural and silvicultural practices can deal with the changes anticipated from climate change. This guidance is an essential contributor in helping ensure designed landscapes can meet those challenges.
A4 | 60 pages | colour
978-0-085538-846-1
££5.00
Stock code:FCPG102
Miscellaneous
National Tree Safety Group
2011
This is one of three new publications that have been produced by the Forestry Commission for the National Tree Safety Group. The three documents provide guidance on trees and public safety in the UK for owners, managers and advisers.
This landowner summary document provides a summary of the full guidance document - Common sense risk management of trees (FCMS024). It is intended for landowners of estates and smallholdings and all those who manage, advise and work on them. The summary does not contain references, notes, detailed discussion, contacts or acknowledgements.

Other related documents are:
Common sense risk management of trees (FCMS024)
Managing trees for safety (FCMS026)
A4 | colour | 20 pages | online only
978-0-85538-841-6
Free
Stock code:FCMS025
Miscellaneous
National Tree Safety Group
2011
This is one of three new publications that have been produced by the Forestry Commission for the National Tree Safety Group. The three documents provide guidance on trees and public safety in the UK for owners, managers and advisers.
This main document provides guidance for inspecting and maintaining trees; guidance that is reasonable and proportionate to: the low risk from trees, the benefits of trees, and the health and safety obligations of those responsible for trees. As a national guidance document produced by an authoritative and representative group, its content and recommendations, if followed, should assist trees owners involved in personal injury or compensation claims when presented to the court as supporting documentation.

Other related documents are:
Common sense risk management of trees - landowner summary (FCMS025)
Managing trees for safety (FCMS026)
A4 | colour | 104 pages
978-0-85538-840-9
£19.99
Stock code:FCMS024
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Mark Johnston, Glynn Percival
2012
Our urban forests, the trees and woodlands in and around our towns and cities, provide numerous environmental, economic and social benefits. As the most important single component of green infrastructure these trees have a vital role to play in promoting sustainable communities. In April 2011, for the first time in Britain, the relevant professional bodies concerned with urban trees and the built environment came together to hold a major international research conference. With some 400 delegates, ‘Trees, People and the Built Environment’ was one of the biggest tree conferences ever held in Britain. Hosted by the Institute of Chartered Foresters, the event featured leading expert practitioners and research scientists from around the world presenting papers that ‘showcased’ the very latest research and innovative practice. These conference proceedings are expected to make a significant contribution to the literature on urban forestry and urban greening.

Download individual PDFs of each paper
Buy a printed version

A4 | 264 pages | colour | online only | print option available
978-0-85538-849-2
Free
Stock code:FCRP017
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2011
This booklet contains a summary of statistics about woodland and forestry. The complete statistics for 2011 are available on our forestry statistics web page.

Please note - the printed version of this document is an A2 sheet folded to A6. The PDF of the document is set to print at A3 therefore some of the pages will appear upside down.
A2 folded to A6 booklet | colour
978-0-85538-852-2
Free
Stock code:FCFS211
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Anna Lawrence, Sarah Gillett
2011
Adaptive forest management is a systematic process for continually improving forest management, in conditions of complexity and uncertainty, by learning from the outcomes of experiments and operational practice. Adaptive management has often been proposed as a suitable approach for dealing with uncertainty and complexity in natural systems, particularly in relation to climate change.

Some of the most significant challenges for implementing adaptive management are social and institutional. This study reviews published evidence, to assess international experience in adaptive forest management and its implications for woodland management in the UK. While much can be learnt from other countries, the pressures on land, high public expectations, fragmented habitats and ownership structures require a particularly collaborative approach in the UK. Characteristics of the UK context, including longstanding experience with partnership working, and a thriving culture of forestry knowledge networks, are promising aspects for a more adaptive approach to forestry.
A4 | 48 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-848-5
Free
Stock code:FCRP016
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2011
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 152 pages | black and white
978-0-10-297178-1
£23.50
Stock code:FCAR011
Miscellaneous
Ruth Tittensor
2011
This is the story of forestry in and around Whitelee Forest, based on the memory of those who lived and work in forestry, knitted together from personal recollections.
Booklet | 64 pages | colour
978-0-85538-798-3
£5.00
Stock code:FCMS118
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
John Moore
2011
Sitka spruce is the main conifer species grown in Great Britain and the commercial wood products industry is primarily based on this species. Wood from Sitka spruce is sawn into timber for use in construction, pallets/packaging and fencing, and is also used in the production of paper and panel products. Research into the wood properties and performance of products made from Sitka spruce has been undertaken in Great Britain for almost 90 years by a number of organisations and the results from this research are contained in a large number of published and unpublished sources.

This report collates and synthesises this research and is written for forest scientists, engineers, wood processors, and end users of wood products who are seeking a better understanding of the material properties and potential end uses of Sitka spruce. It is divided into three parts: (1) the origins of Sitka spruce, its introduction into Great Britain and its growth and management in this country; (2)
Sitka spruce wood properties, including wood anatomy, general wood structure, and physical and mechanical properties; and (3) an overview of the end products that are currently produced from Sitka spruce or that could potentially be produced in the future.
A4 | 56 pages | Colour |
978-0-85538-825-6
£14
Stock code:FCRP015
Annual Report
Forest Research
2011
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 68 pages | colour
978-0-10-295238-4
£15.50
Stock code:FRAR011
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gregory Valatin
2011
Additionality is a core aspect of quality assurance of greenhouse gas emissions reduction and sequestration activities, being used in a climate change context to mean net abatement over and above that which would have arisen anyway in the absence of a given activity or project. The underlying rationale of is to distinguish activities which further contribute to climate change mitigation from those which, although they may be associated with carbon savings, offer no benefits above those expected anyway. Different aspects of additionality are distinguished, and different approaches to testing for these and establishing associated baselines reviewed, in order to help inform development by the Forestry Commission of a Code of Conduct for forestry carbon projects in the UK.
A4 | 28 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-816-4
Free
Stock code:FCRP013
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gregory Valatin
2011
Carbon valuation, discounting and risk management are important in ensuring that effective incentives are put in place to tackle climate change, and in comparing the relative merits of climate mitigation activities over time. Approaches applied in different contexts, including in relation to permanence issues, are reviewed in order to help inform development by the Forestry Commission of a Code of Conduct for forestry carbon projects in the UK. An overview of current UK Government guidance on valuing carbon for policy appraisals is provided and the implications of adopting the UK Treasury’s declining discount rate protocol recommended in the Green Book discussed. It is noted that at present, there is little relationship between the value to society of reducing greenhouse gas emissions or sequestering carbon and the market price.
A4 | 40 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-815-7
Free
Stock code:FCRP012
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Steve Smith, Graham Bull, Justin Gilbert, Simon Gillam, Esther Whitton
2010
This publication details the methodology behind the production of the National Inventory between 1995 and 1999.
A4 | 64 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-819-5
Free
Stock code:FCRP014

External timber cladding: design, installation and performance

Miscellaneous
Ivor Davies, John Wood
2011
This publication is the result of extensive research, testing and detail development and provides the reader with evidence based information on the use of external timber cladding and how to respond to the contradictory demands of moisture control and fire, the two biggest issues affecting the use of timber on building facades. Divided into six sections, the book offers easily referenced guidance to current legislation, detailed drawings and answers to the majority of questions surrounding this technically complex subject.
A4 | 192 pages | colour
978-1-904320-08-1
Free
Stock code:FCFC153
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (England)
2010
Managing ancient and native woodland in England has been produced by Forestry Commission England as an aid to forestry and woodland managers working with ancient and native woodland. It brings together current good management practice to ensure these important woodlands are sustained for the future. Our ancient and native woodlands are one of our oldest land uses and most diverse ecosystems. They have often taken centuries to develop, and for generations they have been an essential source of timber, fuel, coppice products, venison and other sustainable products. They are a vitally important component of the English landscape and every one has it’s own long and fascinating history.
A4 | 64 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-821-8
Free
Stock code:FCPG201

Public engagement in forestry: a toolbox for public engagement in forest and woodland planning

Miscellaneous
Bianca Ambrose-Oji, Bob Frost
2011
This toolbox revises the previous edition - 'Involving people in forestry: a toolbox for public involvement in forest and woodland planning' which was published in 2004. The toolbox provides information and ideas to forest and woodland managers on ways to engage individuals, communities and organisations in the decision-making process, design and management of forestry projects and activities. This includes developing and maintaining equal access to the many public benefits forestry can provide for all members of society.

This publication is available to view and download from:www.forestry.gov.uk/toolbox
| A4 | colour | online only
978-0-85538-829-4
Free
Stock code:FCMS016
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2010
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry
PDF | 13 pages | online only
978-0-85538-811-9
Free
Stock code:FCFS210
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2010
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Ynglyn a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd
PDF | 13 pages | online only
978-0-085538-812-6
Free
Stock code:FCFS310

Choice of Douglas fir seed sources for use in Britain

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Alan M Fletcher, Sam Samuel
2010

Douglas fir plays a particular role in the production of quality timber and is also important for other multipurpose forestry uses. Due to the extent of its natural range in Pacific north-west America, a range of material from natural populations and tree improvement programmes has been evaluated in field trials to identify
the most well-adapted sources for planting in Great Britain.

This publication summarises the results from over half a century of research. The growth and production data have been used to produce suitability maps which can
assist forest managers in their decisions on the choice of seed origin for planting. The publication is recommended reading for forest managers, advisors and researchers alike – as well as readers interested in the development and use of species from the Pacific Northwest in British forestry.

Book | 68 pages | colour
978-085538-809-6
£17.00
Stock code:FCBU129
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2010
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 142 pages | black and white
978-0-10-296734-0
£20.00
Stock code:FCAR010

Forestry and Climate Change pack

Miscellaneous
2010
This pack represents the key Forestry Commission messages on forestry and climate change. It explains in one document the role of trees, woods and forests in tackling and adapting to climate change. The pack, which contains twenty separate information sheets, has been developed for Forestry Commission staff, but can be used by anyone interested in communicating the importance of trees and climate change. A PDF of the pack and the individual sheets is available from our climate change webpages.
Pack
978-0-085538-800-3
Free
Stock code:FCMS022

Business Sustainability pack

Miscellaneous
2010
This pack presents some of the key Forestry Commission initiatives that we have undertaken as part of our commitment to making our business more sustainable. It explains the background to the Environmental Management System that underpins our business sustainability programme, and gives examples of major construction projects that demonstrate best practice in sustainable design and management. The pack will be of interest to anyone who would like to find out more about business sustainability in the Forestry Commission.

The leaflets included in this pack, plus other case studies, are available on our sustainability web pages.

Pack
978-0-085538-806-5
Free
Stock code:FCMS023
Practice Guide
Matthew Ritchie, Jonathan Wordsworth
2010
Identifying the historic environment in Scotland's forests and woodlands has been prepared by Forestry Commission Scotland and Archaeology Scotland as an aid to forestry and woodland managers when considering the historic environment in their stewardship. The principal purpose of this practice guide is to provide an accessible introduction to exploring 'archaeology in the field'.
Archaeological and historical features represent a valuable and fragile resource. Once damaged or destroyed they can never be replaced nor properly understood - and important elements of our history and inheritance are lost. They are a critical part of the wider contemporary landscape and are part of the legacy that all land managers hand on to their successors. They can enhance the sense of place and historical context of the local community - and play a significant role in ensuring a more diverse and attractive landscape. An understanding and appreciation of the historic environment is essential if we are to protect the achievements of our ancestors for the benefit of future generations.
A4 | 40 pages | colour
978-0-85538-799-0
£6.50
Stock code:FCPG101
Annual Report
Forest Research
2010
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 100 pages | colour
978-0-10-295231-5
£19.75
Stock code:FRAR010

No rivalry but different

Miscellaneous
2010
This is the story of forestry in and around Glenmore and Rothiemurchus based on the memory of those who lived and work in forestry, knitted together from personal recollections.
Booklet | 68 pages | colour
978-0-085538-797-6
£5
Stock code:FCMS117
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2009
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry
A6 booklet | 2 colour | 20 pages
978-0-085538-790-7
Free
Stock code:FCFS209
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2009
Crynodeb o ystadegau ynglyn a choetiroedd a choedwigoedd
A6 booklet | 2 colour | 20 pages
978-0-085538-791-4
Free
Stock code:FCFS309
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2009
The report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 133 pages | black and white
978-0-10-295949-9
£19.50
Stock code:FCAR009
Annual Report
Forest Research
2009
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 84 pages | colour
978-0-10-295223-0
£19.15
Stock code:FRAR009
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
David Edwards, Anna Elliott, Suzanne Martin, Jake Morris, Elizabeth A O'brien, Andrew J Peace
2009
This report presents the results of a comprehensive valuation of the current social and economic benefits of forestry, forests and woodlands in Scotland that are derived by the people of Scotland. The research was based upon a typology of seven ‘Forestry for People’ themes which were: employment and volunteering, contribution to the economy, recreation and accessibility, learning and education, health and well-being, culture and landscape, and community capacity. An indicator framework was developed as a basis for defining the scope of the project, reporting of headline findings, and to aid project management. Thirty quantitative indicators covering the seven themes are given in the report. The use of quantitative indicators was supplemented by qualitative research from two contrasting case study regions: the Loch Ness area in the Scottish Highlands, and the Glasgow and Clyde Valley region.
A4 | 206 pages | colour
978-0-85538-782-2
£19.50
Stock code:FCRP101
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2008
This report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 108 pages | black and white
978-0-10-295551-4
£12.85
Stock code:FCAR008
Annual Report
Forest Research
2008
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 115 pages | colour
978-0-10-295211-7
£18.55
Stock code:FRAR008

Estimating deer abundance in woodlands: the combination plot technique

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Graeme Swanson, Helen Armstrong, Douglas Campbell
2008
This Bulletin describes a technique for measuring deer abundance in woodlands. The technique is a variation of the faecal accumulation rate method and was developed and refined using data from more than ten years of monitoring and research by Strath Caulaidh Ltd. In justifying their choice of each element of the technique, the authors also provide one of the most comprehensive overviews of dung counting methods available. This Bulletin will be of use to both deer managers and deer researchers as well as being of interest to those considering using a dung counting method to monitor the density of other herbivore species.
191 x 254 mm | 58 pages | colour
978-0-085538-750-1
£17.50
Stock code:FCBU128
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2007
A4 | colour | 8 pages
0
Free

The forest is a beautiful place to be

Miscellaneous
2008
This is the story of forestry in and around The Great Glen based on the memory of those who lived and work in forestry, knitted together from personal recollections.
Booklet | 48 pages | colour
978-085538-761-7
£5
Stock code:FCMS115
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2007
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry.
A6 booklet
9780855387426
Free
Stock code:FCFS207
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2007
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Yngl^yn ^a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd
]A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry (Welsh).
A6 booklet
9780855387433
Free
Stock code:FCFS307
Practice Guide
Peter Gosling
2007
This Practice Guide introduces the principles and practical methods for collecting, storing and propagating from seed a wide range of woody species commonly grown in the British Isles. It is aimed partly at anyone interested in raising a relatively small number of plants, and partly at commercial growers – as a useful reference but without the legal aspects. The Guide begins with information on flowering and fruit development, and recommendations for small–scale collecting, handling and processing. It then provides detailed advice on storage, dormancy and pretreatment methods for over 100 woody species. It gives suggestions of ‘things to try’ to hasten dormancy breakage in the most time consuming and dormant species. The Guide concludes with some tips on sowing seeds and raising seedlings.
A4 | 36 pages | colour
9780855387365
£5.50
Stock code:FCPG018
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2007
This report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 110 pages | black and white
978-0-10-294615-4
£12.50
Stock code:FCAR007
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2007
A4 booklet | 2 colour
9780855387297
Free
Stock code:FCFC003
Annual Report
Forest Research
2007
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 116 pages | colour
978-0-10-295202-5
£18.00
Stock code:FRAR007

Choice of Sitka spruce seed origins for use in British forests

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
C.J.A. Samuel
2007
Sitka spruce is one of the most important and widely planted conifer species in Great Britain today. It plays a key role in the production of timber and is also important for other multipurpose forestry uses. Due to the extensive latitudinal distribution of its natural range along the Pacific Northwest coastline, it was necessary to establish seed origin studies to identify the most well-adapted sources for planting in Great Britain. This Bulletin summarises the results emanating from over 70 years of research. The growth and production data have been used to produce a series of suitability maps which can assist forest managers in their decisions on the choice of seed origins for planting. The Bulletin is recommended reading for forest managers, advisors and researchers alike – as well readers interested in the development and use of species from the Pacific Northwest used for forestry in Great Britain.
978-0-085538-727-3
£21
Stock code:FCBU127

Leisure landscapes: exploring the role of forestry in tourism

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Suzanne Martin
2007
A4 | 40 pages | colour
0855387114
£10
Stock code:FCRP011

Smell of the rosin noise of the saw

Miscellaneous
2007
This is the story of forestry in and around Knapdale and Lochaweside, based on the memory of those who lived and work in forestry, knitted together from personal recollections.
Booklet | 40 pages | colour
978-085538-745-7
£5
Stock code:FCMS113

New timber architecture in Scotland

Miscellaneous
Peter Wilson
2007
A quiet revolution has been taking place in Scotland's architecture. Wood is once again to the fore in construction and has established a strong, contemporary presence in the nations' built environment. This publication illustrates 90 exemplar projects and demonstrates clearly that there is no single building type unsuited to the use of this adaptable, variable and infinitely renewable material
330 x 247mm | 112 pages | colour
978-1-904320-05-0
Free
Stock code:FCMS114

Growing places: a study of social change in the National Forest

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Jake Morris
2006
A4 | 48 pages | colour
0855387092
£11
Stock code:FCRP010

A marvellous opportunity for children to learn: a participatory evaluation of forest school in England and Wales

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Liz O'brien
2006
A4 | 52 pages | colour
0855387106
£11
Stock code:FCRP009
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2006
This guidance note sets out Forestry Commission Scotland (FCS) policy for selecting suitable origins, provenances, and categories of planting material for planting native species of trees and shrubs in Scotland. The policy will apply both to FCS support for private woodlands and to the management of the national forest estate.
A4 | 10 pages | colour
0-85538-712-2
Free
Stock code:FCFC151
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2006
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry.
A6 booklet
0855387068
Free
Stock code:FCFS206
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2006
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Yngl^yn ^a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd
]A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry (Welsh/English)
A6 booklet
0855387076
Free
Stock code:FCFS306

Heritage trees of Scotland

Miscellaneous
Donald Rodger, John Stokes
2006
Every country has its heritage trees - old trees, wide trees, tall trees, rare trees, "weird and wonderful" trees, and trees with historical and cultural significance. Scotland is blessed with an unusually rich heritage of such trees: perhaps the richest in the world.

More than 130 of Scotland's most remarkable trees are stunningly presented in the second edition of Heritage Trees of Scotland now in its expanded hardback second edition. Many of the trees in it were brought to the authors' attention by members of the public who read the first edition.

More information on Heritage trees of Scotland

246 x 198mm | 256 pages | colour
0-904853-06-3
£19.99
Stock code:FCMS108
Practice Guide
Colin Edwards
2006
Invasive rhododendron presents a unique problem to the managers of any habitats it colonises. If left untreated, this aggressive weed can rapidly occupy the entire understorey of a range of woodland types, open spaces within woodlands and heathland habitats. This Practice Guide provides guidance on managing and controlling rhododendron in invaded habitats, including information on site survey, prioritising areas for treatment, selecting the most effective control techniques, and monitoring of treated areas.
A4 | 36 pages
0-85538-704-1
£6.50
Stock code:FCPG017
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
, Marla Emery
2006
The research reported in this publication was designed to document social, cultural, economic and environmental characteristics of current non-timber forest product gatherer practices and perceptions and explore their implications for forest policy and management.

Collecting wild plant materials and fungi is a valued part of the lives of the people who participated in this project, and the findings reinforce and highlight the popularity of woodland product gathering in Scotland. At the same time, the downward pressure on timber prices and the related need to diversify the economic base of rural areas has led woodland managers and policy makers to consider non-timber forest products as potential sources of revenue and rural development opportunities.

Sustainable forest management places an emphasis on managing forests for a broad range of values and uses. Clearly, then, there is a need to understand contemporary non-timber forest product uses and values in Scotland and how these might be managed in a sustainable manner.
A4 | 40 pages | full colour
0855386959
£12.50
Stock code:FCRP008
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2006
Small woodlands, woodland features and even individual trees can be an asset on any farm. This guidance describes the benefits of creating new small woodlands, where they can best be sited and offers some advice on planning, layout and species. It focuses on small woodlands of a few hectares in size, say no bigger than five hectares.
A4 | 68 pages | colour
0-85538-691-6
Free
Stock code:FCFC150
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2006
This Guide lets you find out more about the trees found in the forests and woodlands of Great Britain. It helps you identify some of the most common species and shows how important they are in our day-to-day lives.
Extended A2 folded to 1/3 A4 | 2 pages | colour
0-85538-692-4
Free
Stock code:FCMS020
Technical Guide
Roger Trout
2006
This publication replaces Forestry Commission Bulletin 102: Forest fencing, published 14 years ago. It recommends best practice principles for managers and practitioners as a guide to planning, assessment and mitigation of adverse factors, in choosing the fence design appropriate for the target species and by indicating the key practical steps in construction. It assists in identifying the normal specifications of components required to accommodate typical situations and when taking account of special local circumstances. It assumes that those involved are reasonably familiar with agricultural stock fencing installation, but outlines working with spring steel line wires, hexagonal mesh and high tensile netting products, which together create the recommended generic fencing options against rabbits and deer. Sections on temporary and electric fences are provided, together with tools, safety aspects and maintenance.
A4 book | 50 pages | Full colour
0855386886
£7.50
Stock code:FCTG002
Annual Report
Forest Research
2006
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 104 pages | colour
0-10-293637-4
£20.60
Stock code:FRAR006
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2006
This report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 188 pages | black & white
0102936382
£19.70
Stock code:FCAR006

Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration

Miscellaneous
Forest Research
2006
Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration is a series of Guidance Notes based on research and practical experience in the restoration of brownfield land for woodland and urban greening. The Notes are aimed at practitioners and all those responsible for restoring land back to other end uses, particularly those involving trees and woodland.

The Notes can also be downloaded as PDF files.

Wallet containing Best Practice Guidance Notes
0
£25
Stock code:FRMS002
Miscellaneous
Liz O'brien
2005
Trees and woodlands: nature’s health service is aimed at a wide range of health professionals and environmental professionals: both policymakers and practitioners. It provides information and evidence supporting the idea that
the use and enjoyment of woodlands and green spaces improves people’s overall health and well-being. By outlining research and current practical projects it is hoped that this book will bring inspiration and ideas for developing future work and new partnerships.
Paperback
0-85538-675-4
£9
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2005
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain.
A6 booklet
0855386681
Free
Stock code:FCFS205
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2005
A6 booklet
085538669X
Free
Stock code:FCFS305
Miscellaneous
Paul Tabbush
2005
As part of Forest Design Planning, qualitative social research methods were used to describe and evaluate the participatory process developed in the New Forest. The process was followed in action at Cranborne Chase and North Dorset Forest District and interviews and discussion groups were held in 2003 and 2004. This report discusses in detail the results of this evaluation.

For a hardcopy of this report contact Joanne Davies of Forest Research at Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey.

Paperback
0-85538-660-6
£6
Stock code:FRMS
Annual Report
Forest Research
2005
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 118 pages | colour
0-10-293634-X
£22.10
Stock code:FRAR005
Miscellaneous
Liz O'brien, Paul Tabbush
2005
Addressing crime and safety issues. Report of a seminar organised by Forest Research supported by Lancashire Constabulary, CABE Space and English Nature.

To obtain a hardcopy of this report contact Joanne Davies of Forest Research at Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey.
Paperback
0-85538-653-3
£7
Miscellaneous
Jo Mundy
2004
An introductory guide to life cycle assessment for construction products aimed at manufacturers and specifiers. Jointly published by the Forestry Commission and BRE.
A4 leaflet
0855386517
Free
Stock code:FCMS018
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Sue Weldon
2004
A review of Forestry Commission practice and governance in a changing political and economic context.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white
0855386509
£5.50
Stock code:FCRP007
Practice Guide
I Willoughby
2004
This Practice Guide contains detailed recommendations for the establishment of new broadleaved woodlands by direct seeding, a silvicultural system whereby tree seed is sown by hand or machine into a prepared seedbed at a site intended for woodland creation.
0855386428
£6.00
Stock code:FCPG016
Miscellaneous
Liz O'brien
2004
This publication aims to give land managers, policymakers and all those with a wide interest in forestry a picture of how people relate to woodlands and the natural environment.


To obtain a hardcopy of this report contact Joanne Davies of Forest Research at Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey.
Paperback
0-85538-649-5
£10
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2005
This report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 181 pages | black & white
0102936358
£18.95
Stock code:FCAR005
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2005
The aim of this guide is to encourage greater use of UK grown hardwoods. It provides information on the range of quality available from our sawn hardwood timber and highlights the special features of UK grown hardwoods that are often difficult to obtain from imports. The guide also gives information on timber measurement, the properties and uses of UK hardwoods, and an illustrated technical glossary.
A4 | colour | 48 pages
1-904320-03-1
Free
Stock code:FCMS110
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2005
This good practice guide aims to strike a balance between the needs of bats and the diverse objectives of woodland managers. It gives general principles and practical advice to assist in the management of your particular woodland, while recognising potentially conflicting management interests and objectives.
The guide examines the management of woodland in blocks or stands, ranging in size from an avenue of trees to large wooded landscapes. It is designed to help you sustain entire bat populations in woodland habitats, rather than focusing on each individual bat roost.
A4 landscape | 16 pages | colour
0-85538-667-3
Free
Stock code:FCFC212
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Chris P Quine
2004
Proceedings of a symposium on 'Managing woodlands and their mammals' organised jointly by The Mammal Society and the Forestry Commission. The aim of the meeting was to bring mammalogists and foresters together to review knowledge, foster understanding and enhance cooperation between enthusiastic groups interested in the welfare of the British countryside. This publication seeks to summarise the meeting and act as a source of information for those interested in the topic; all but one of the talks at the conference are presented here.
A4 | 106 pages | black & white
0855386452
£12.50
Stock code:FCRP006
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2004
This report is available to download here or to buy in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 185 pages | black & white
0102926336
£20.10
Stock code:FCAR004
Annual Report
Forest Research
2004
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 175 pages | colour
0-10-292635-2
£25.10
Stock code:FRAR004

A new dawn for native woodland restoration on the Forestry Commission Estate in Scotland

Miscellaneous
George F Peterken, Alan W Stevenson
2004
This publication reviews the progress made with Forest Enterprise Scotland's programme of native woodland maintenance, improvement, restoration and expansion, started in 1991, and considers where the process of native woodland restoration goes from here.
A4 | 60 pages | colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCMS109

Woodfuel Information Pack

Miscellaneous
Duncan Ireland
2004
This Woodfuel Information Pack brings together key basic information about many aspects of using wood for fuel. These include background on benefits, renewable energy targets and policy, conversion, end users and systems. For more information, visit the Woodfuel web pages at: www.forestresearch.gov.uk/woodfuel.
A4 Ring binder
0855386339
£10
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2004
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain
A6 booklet | 16 pages | 2 colour
0855386398
Free
Stock code:FCFS204
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2004
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Yngl^yn ^a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd
]A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry (Welsh/English)
A6 booklet | 32 pages | 2 colour
0855386401
Free
Stock code:FCFS304
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Catharine Thompson Ward
2004
This report presents the results of a project which researched the use and abuse of forests and woodlands in the central belt of Scotland. The research was to explore public use of, and attitudes towards, forests and woodlands, and to address questions on aspects of use and user provision which had been identified as important by land-owners, managers and administrators. The aspects were the level of use of forests and woods, the profile of users and the reasons for visiting certain places, and the quality of the experiences gained by different segments of the population in relation to forests and woods. The Forestry Commission, as part of its delivery of sustainable forestry, was also concerned to improve the delivery of benefits to communities, including recreation values and community participation.
A4 booklet | 8 Pages | Colour | CD containing full report
0855386258
£9.50
Stock code:FCRP005
Technical Guide
2004
This Technical Guide serves as a source of information for those involved in winching operations in forestry. A series of basic principles are presented on winch forces and fail-safe systems including a discussion of areas where shortfalls in safety can commonly occur. Guidance is provided on the controlled failure of winch systems. Example winch set-ups are illustrated which demonstrate the forces involved and identify the appropriate equipment rating for a series of hypothetical tree-takedown and debogging situations.

The Guide focuses solely on the use of static hand or vehicle mounted mechanised winches and does not cover the use of vehicles used in pulling operators. The use of winches for lifting is a separate subject, especially with regard to the legislation on lifting equipment, and is not covered in this Guide. Please note that the Guide is not a substitute for training; anyone involved in winching must have first received the appropriate technical and first-aid training.

A4 booklet | 28 pages | 2 colour
085538638X
£6.00
Stock code:FCTG001
Practice Guide
I Willoughby
2004
UK Government and European policy is to minimise pesticide use as far as possible. Covering pest, disease, vegetation and wildlife management, and based upon the latest research, Reducing Pesticide Use in Forestry can help forestry practitioners to assess the impact of any problem and select a non-chemical solution. Two simple flowcharts summarise the decision process and link to comprehensive reference material in the rest of the guide. If pesticide use is unavoidable, the guide should help managers to keep chemical use to the minimum level necessary consistent with good practice while at the same time reducing the risk of damage to the environment.
Spare copies of Decision Recording Sheet and the Optional Decision Aid [to assist in balancing the possible non-target effects of pesticides] are available to download here as pdf files:
Decision recording sheet
Optional decision aid
A4 | 140 pages | full colour
0855386177
£16.00
Stock code:FCPG015

Habitat networks for wildlife and people - the creation of sustainable forest habitats

Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission, Anon. Snh
2003
This publication discusses the enrichment of the natural heritage interest of Scotland's woods and forests through the creation of woodland networks - linking woodlands old and new to form a more continuous woodland cover.

The punblication proposes ways in which our woods and forests can be linked more intimately within the landscape; suggests that woodland should be viewed as an integral part of the wider scene rather than as individual stands of trees; emphasises the importance of placing woods and forests within the context of the many other forms of land use; and above all offers a new, holistic approach to appreciating and enhancing the value of all our woodlands.

A4 | 44 pages | colour
0-85538-299-6
Free
Stock code:FCMS107
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2003
Out of print: available as a PDF file only.
This Report presents the Annual Report and Accounts 2002-2003 for Great Britain and England.
The Forestry Commission also prepares formal Reports for the Scottish Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales. These cover our activities in Scotland and Wales.
A4 | 164 pages | black & white
0102926263
£18.20
Stock code:FCAR003
Annual Report
Forest Research
2003
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 127 pages | colour
0-10-292625-8
£23.00
Stock code:FRAR003
Miscellaneous
Peter Wilson
2002
This publication aims to provide accurate and up-to-date guidance on the use of timber cladding for architects, self-builders, planning and building control officers, contractors and cladding manufacturers. By describing, illustrating and interpreting its use in contemporary design, it is hoped that the publication will stimulate further discussion on the future potential of timber cladding in Scotland.
A4 | 64 pages | Colour
1-904320-00-7
Free
Stock code:FCMS104
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Jonathan W Humphrey
2003
A4 | 118 pages | black & white
0855386088
£10.00
Stock code:FCRP004
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
S Bell
2003
Progress in research with special reference to Glen Affric and Sherwood Forest.
A4 | 162 pages | black & white + colour sections
0855385901
£19.00
Stock code:FCRP002
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2003
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain.
A6 booklet | 16 pages | 2 colour
0855386061
Free
Stock code:FCFS203
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
S Bell
2003
A4 | 78 pages | black & white + colour sections
0855386002
£12.50
Stock code:FCRP003
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2003
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Ynglyn a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd ym Mhrydain Fawr.
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain (Welsh/English).
A6 booklet | 32 pages | 2 colour
085538607X
Free
Stock code:FCFS303
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385847
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG005
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385855
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG006
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385871
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG008
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385839
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG004
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385820
£$3.00
Stock code:FCPG003
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 32 pages | 2-colour
0855385863
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG007
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385804
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG001
Miscellaneous
Elizabeth A O'brien
2003
This publication provides presentation synopses and workshop discussions from three expert consultations held on 'Health and Well-being: Trees, Woodlands and Natural Spaces' during 2002.
A4 | 56 pages | full colour
0855385936
£10.00
Stock code:FRMS001
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385812
£3.00
Stock code:FCPG002
Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Jonathan W Humphrey
2003
Proceedings of a conference held at Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, 14-15 September 2000.
This publication comprises the proceedings of the conference. Its principle aim was to bring together researchers, practitioners and policymakers to allow a full and free exchange of views, information and ideas on the theme of native woodland restoration at the landscape scale. This includes creating new native woodland, restoring planted ancient woodland, and expanding existing native woodlands.
A4 | 158 pages | black & white + colour sections
0855385898
£17.50
Stock code:FCRP001
Practice Guide
Richard N Thompson
2003
The purpose of this Practice Guide is to give best practice advice to owners and managers on the restoration of native woodland on ancient woodland sites which have been planted with non-native species. The emphasis of the Guide is on the potential contribution of restoration to biodiversity and the practical considerations for successful development of native woodland.
A pull-out Site Assessment Guide (PDF) is included which has been designed to assist users in rating the restoration potential of any site and rank the relative priority of a number of sites.
A4 | 52 pages | full colour
0855385790
£9.00
Stock code:FCPG014

Phytophthora disease of alder in Europe

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Cees Van Dijk
2003
Alders play a vitally important role in Europe. Their diversity of characters not only enables them to establish as pioneers but in many cases also allows them to play a significant part in climax forests and make a major contribution to the ecology and stability of river banks. All four European alder species are important in the establishment of woodland on difficult sites. European alders are largely free from major pest and disease problems so the discovery of a previously unknown disease, caused by a new Phytophthora fungus, led to major Concerted Action within Europe. The Bulletin sets out to:
- determine if the spread of the disease within Europe can be limited.
- define the nature of the pathogen.
- make recommendations on disease management and control.
- identify future research requirements.
Although aimed primarily at forest pathologists and managers, it is hoped that these issues will prove to be of interest to a wider audience, coupled with the fact that work on alder Phytophthora disease has also thrown up important information about the generation of new pathogens through unusual hybridisation events and other evolutionary processes.
191 x 254 mm | 82 Pages | colour
0855386053
£16.00
Stock code:FCBU126
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2002
Available as pdf file only.
A4 | 156 pages | black & white
0102997004
£17.35
Stock code:FCAR002
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2002
This booklet is written for anyone and everyone with an interest in Scotland’s trees, woods and forests. It describes how our trees, woods and forests are being managed to make a positive contribution to the environment. A place for wildlife – and also a place for people.
A4 | colour | 42 pages |
0
Free
Stock code:FCMS105
Annual Report
Forest Research
2002
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 128 pages | colour
0-10-299900-7
£18.50
Stock code:FRAR002
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2002
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain.
A6 booklet | 16 pages | 2 colour
0855385731
Free
Stock code:FCFS202
Forestry Facts & Figures
Forestry Commission
2002
Crynodeb o Ystadegau Ynglyn a Choetiroedd a Choedwigoedd ym Mhrydain Fawr.
A summary of statistics about woodland and forestry in Great Britain (Welsh/English).
A6 booklet | 32 pages | 2 colour
085538574X
Free
Stock code:FCFS302
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
2002
This publication outlines, from a domestic perspective, some of the key international commitments on forests and identifies the actions associated with them.
This publication is currently web only.
A4 | 28 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385553
Free
Stock code:FCMS012
Miscellaneous
Elizabeth A O'brien
2002
This publication provides the presentation papers, workshop discussions, questions and answers and plenary discussion from a two-day conference held at Cardiff University in June 2001. The main aim of the conference was to outline the future direction for social forestry research and develop a broader perspective on issues connected with people and the environment. The conference provided the opportunity for a broad cross-section of government bodies, non-governmental organisations, academics, practitioners and researchers to exchange knowledge, experience and ideas in this important subject area.
A4 | 140 pages | 2 colour + full colour section
0855385561
£15.00
Stock code:FCMS013

Climate change: impacts on UK forests

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Mark Broadmeadow
2002
Human-induced climate change has become increasingly important in our everyday lives and, inevitably, will continue to do so.This Bulletin describes current thinking on the most likely effects of climate change on UK forests and woodlands.
Predicted changes in the main environmental drivers - temperature, water availability, wind and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels - are discussed, together with their potential impacts on forest growth and the incidence of pests and diseases. The Bulletin also explores the implications of environmental change for semi-natural woodland ecosystems and for species choice in managed forests.
The Bulletin is recommended reading for forest managers and advisers, students and all those with an interest in the consequences of global change to our forests.
191 x 254 mm | 198 Pages | colour
0855385545
£25.00
Stock code:FCBU125
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2001
Available as PDF file only.
A4 | 168 pages | black & white
0102989001
Free
Stock code:FCAR001
Annual Report
Forest Research
2001
This report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 102 pages | colour
0-10-299000-X
£16.70
Stock code:FRAR001
Miscellaneous
2001
This booklet seeks to raise the awareness of architects, designers and specifiers of the historical precendents, availability and current potential uses of Scottish wood.
Colour booklet | online only
0855385391
Free
Stock code:FCMS103

An ecological site classification for forestry in Great Britain

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Graham Pyatt, Duncan Ray
2001

The site classification in this Bulletin provides a sound ecological basis for the sustainable management of forests for timber production, wildlife conservation and other benefits. Applicable to all kinds of woodlands, from plantations of a single species through the range to semi-natural woodlands of many species, it incorporates the existing classification of soil types used as the basis of silviculture for many years.

This Bulletin contains the methodologycoded into the Ecological Site Classification Decision Support System (ESC-DSS), which is a computer-based model deisgned to match the key site factors and the ecological requirements of different tree species and woodland communities anywhere in Britain. ESC-DSS is designed as a stand based, user-friendly practical forest planning tool.

190 X 244mm | 74 pages | colour
0-85538-418-2
Free
Stock code:FCBU124
Annual Report
Forest Research
2000
The report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 92 pages | colour
0-10-298500-6
£16.30
Stock code:FRAR1999-2000
Practice Guide
David Lonsdale
2000
This Practice Guide indicates the responsibilities of owners and managers for assessing the risk of hazards from trees, and considers what inspection procedures might be appropriate. Preventative care of young trees and methods of protecting trees from wildlife damage are described. Details of tree hazards, signs of their occurrence, and options for remedial work are presented.
A4 | 28 pages | 2 colour
0855385146
£7.00
Stock code:FCPG013

Managing rides, roadsides and edge habitats in lowland forests

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Clive I Carter
2000
Information on the ecological value and management of forest rides, roadsides and edge habitats is presented. Part 1 looks at the value of edges and open areas in both semi-natural and plantation woodland. The influences of light, microclimate, vegetation succession and wildlife are discussed. Part 2 provides a practical guide to edge management options.
191 x 254 mm | 78 Pages | black & white + colour section
0855384158
£16.00
Stock code:FCBU123

Agroforestry in the UK

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Max Hislop
2000
Research-based advice on the establishment, management, costs and benefits of agroforestry systems in the UK is presented. The information is presented in four sections: background, best practice, and current research, environmental and landscape impacts, social and economic impacts. UK agriculture is in a period of major change. Agroforestry systems provide attractive opportunities for alternative rural land uses.
191 x 254 mm | 128 Pages | black & white + colour section
085538414X
£25.00
Stock code:FCBU122
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
2000
Published by The Stationary Office, for the year ending 31 March 2000.
0 10 298400
Free
Stock code:FCAR2000
Annual Report
Forest Research
1999
The report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 96 pages | colour
0-10-296200-6
£18.50
Stock code:FRAR1998-1999
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1999
Published by The Stationary Office, for the year ending 31 March 1999.
210 x 297mm | 80 pages | colour
0 10 296 000 3
Free
Stock code:FCAR1999
Annual Report
Forest Research
1998
The report is available to download here or to order in hardcopy from The Stationery Office (TSO) (Phone: 0870 600 5522; www.tsoshop.co.uk)
A4 | 104 pages | colour
0-10-254598-7
£17.00
Stock code:FRAR1997-1998
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1998
Published by The Stationary Office for HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1998.
210 x 297mm | 84 pages | colour
0 10 254398 4
Free
Stock code:FCAR1998

The potential for the natural regeneration of conifers in Britain

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Chris J Nixon
1999
Conifer tree seed biology is outlined (production and dispersal, dormancy and germination). Factors affecting seedling establishment are noted. Techniques for the assessment and management of established seedlings are described, as are methods of forest management for the encouragement on natural regeneration. Relative economics are discussed. An appendix provides notes on regeneration potential for the main conifer species grown in Britain.
191 x 254 mm | 50 Pages | black & white + colour section
0855384018
£14.00
Stock code:FCBU120

Cultivation of soils for forestry

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
W L Mason
1999
Section 1 describes the impacts of cultivation on site conditions (temperature, moisture, density, nutrients), the effects of cultivation on tree survival, growth, yield and stability, and impacts on the environment.
Section 2 gives advice on choosing the appropriate cultivation technique for the preparation of soils for tree planting. Site characteristics and proposed woodland type are considered, and recommendations given for cultivation of the major soil groups. An economic evaluation of the benefits of cultivation is presented.
191 x 254 mm | 86 Pages | black & white + colour section
085538400X
£14.00
Stock code:FCBU119

Forest tree seedlings

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
J L Morgan
1999
This Bulletin gives guidance about choosing plants for the establishment of different types of woodland in Britain. Recommendations cover the range of activities from plant supply through to monitoring the success of establishment. Categories of planting stock and their size specifications are given, and lifting, storage and treatment operations are described. Best practices for the handling and planting of forest tree seedlings to ensure high survival rates and good early growth are important for successful woodland establishment.
191 x 254 mm | 44 Pages | black & white + colour section
0855384042
£12.50
Stock code:FCBU121

The living forest

Miscellaneous
1999
This publication contains the proceedings of an international symposium on the Non-market Benefits of Forestry that was organised by the Forestry Commission and held in Edinburgh in 1996. The objectives of the symposium were to explore the latest developments in measuring and valuing the non-market outputs of forestry; and to examine how best to use information about non-market outputs in making decisions about forest management, and in the development and implementation of forestry policy. The proceedings include keynote papers from leading experts in Austria, Germany, Italy, Sweden, the UK, and the USA. Papers were also delivered by speakers from Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Indonesia, Mozambique, Norway, Russia, Romania and Slovakia.
Hardback | 415 pages | black & white
0117103438
£80 originally NOW £20
Stock code:FCMS006
Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
1998
Booklet | 24 pages | colour | online only
0855383577
Free
Stock code:FCMS101

Ecology and conservation of raptors in forests

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Steve J Petty
1998
The status and ecology of raptors (birds of prey) in Britain and the legislation giving them full protection is described. Management techniques are proposed that will improve man-made conifer forests in the uplands for this spectacular group of birds and the food webs on which they are dependent.
191 x 254 mm | 36 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103446
£14.99
Stock code:FCBU118
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1997
Printed by The Stationary Office for HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1997.
210 x 297mm | 84 pages | colour
0 10 258998 4
Free
Stock code:FCAR1997
Practice Guide
Andy J Moffat
1997
This guide provides operational guidance to managers on the potential impacts of whole-tree harvesting upon the forest ecosystem. It also considers the likely risks on different sites and makes recommendations for managers faced with different harvesting options.
A4 | 12 pages | full colour
0855383607
£5.00
Stock code:FCPG011

Tree establishment on landfill sites

Miscellaneous
Forestry Commission
1997
The results of 3 years commissioned research in the 1990s provide valuable information and advice on this important topic. Care in soil selection and placement, species choice, tree stock type, weed control, and protection against browsing animals is emphasised. Provided that there is a sufficient depth of overlying soil, woodland should pose no greater threat to landfill cap integrity than any other vegetation. Tree planting is therefore an excellent means of enhancing the landscape and providing amenity and recreational benefits on reclaimed landfill sites.
Booklet | 53 pages | black and white
0855383518
£12.00
Stock code:FCMS007
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1996
Published by HMSO, for the year ending March 31 1996.
210 x 297mm | 112 pages | colour
0 10 257797 8
Free
Stock code:FCAR1996
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
1996
A5 | 36 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855382716
Free
Stock code:FCPG010

Water storage of timber: experience in Britain

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Joan F Webber
1996
The gale of October 1987 blew down 4 million cubic metres of timber in the south of England, about one-third of which was pine. Construction and management of a wet store is described. Monitoring of log condition and water effluent quality was undertaken. Incidence of bluestain was restricted to a low level. Porosity of timber increased significantly during water shortage. The softwood strength reduced slightly but did not reduce the yield of construction grade timber.
191 x 254 mm | 48 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103373
£12.50
Stock code:FCBU117
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1995
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1995.
210 x 297mm | 104 pages | colour
0 10 021245 X
Free
Stock code:FCAR1995
Handbook
Simon J. Hodge
1995
This Handbook describes how to plan, create and manage urban woodlands. The primary role of urban forestry is to provide multi-purpose woodlands which improve the quality of daily life for the 46 million urban people of Britain and so the Handbook goes beyond the technical issues of establishing and m anaging trees to encompass community involvement, planning multi-purpose woodlands and the wider urban context. An emphasis on case studies gives practical insights into urban forestry in its widest sense. This Handbook is still available to order in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 176 pages | colour
0-11-710328-4
£18.00
Stock code:FCHB011
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
1995
A5 | 36 pages | 2 colour
0855383313
Free
Stock code:FCPG009

Our pinewood heritage

Miscellaneous
1995
These conference proceedings comprise 28 papers in 5 sections: overview of the pinewoods in 1994, management issues, management practice, recent research and development, and the way ahead. Eight posters are also summarised. Expanding the area of native pinewoods in Scotland, conserving their ecology, increasing biodiversity, and recognising them as a community resource will sustain this woodland heritage for future generations.
Booklet | 266 pages | black and white
0855383259
£25.00
Stock code:FCMS102

Forests and wind: management to minimise damage

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Barry A Gardiner
1995
The windthrow hazard classification has been widely used to guide forest managers on the selection of strategies to predict and minimise wind damage to forests. The principles of wind damage are described in sections covering wind, soils, mechanics, root anchorage, adaptive growth, interactions and risk. This comprehensive review will guide management to adopt measures that will help to reduce serious damage and windthrow occurrences.
191 x 254 mm | 24 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103322
£7.00
Stock code:FCBU114

Alternative silvicultural systems to clearcutting in Britain: a review

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Chris P Quine
1995
Provides a comprehensive summary of British experience of alternative systems to clear cutting covering shelterwood systems, group selection, single tree selection, and restructuring. The economics of irregular forestry are discussed and environmental impacts considered. A concluding chapter describes resources and benefits, opportunities and recommendations for the adoption of irregular forestry systems. An invaluable reference work on the subject.
191 x 254 mm | 92 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103349
£15.95
Stock code:FCBU115
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1994
Published by HMOS, for the year ending 31 March 1994.
210 x 297mm | 128 pages | colour
0 10 266194 4
Free
Stock code:FCAR1994
Handbook
G.D. Springthorpe, N.G. Myhill
1994
This Handbook is based on the creative conservation employed at Cannock. It is a manual written by working wildlife rangers for working wildlife rangers, and it will benefit shy and endangered wildlife and the public who can now enjoy them. The Handbook includes sections on: the ranger and forestry, wildlife and conservation, crop protection, deer management, the public, sporting management, and the ranger and the law, as well as a comprehensive glossary. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 125 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710326-8
£15.95
Stock code:FCHB010
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1994
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1993.
210 x 297mm | 112 pages | colour
0 10 215194 6
Free
Stock code:FCAR1993

Roe deer biology and management

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Brenda A Mayle
1994
A brief account of roe deer biology is given. A management strategy based on deer numbers, population dynamics and habitat changes is proposed. Juvenile mortality has a regulatory effect on roe deer populations, but culls of about 20% may be necessary in order to prevent populations from increasing in size.
191 x 254 mm | 28 pages | black & white + colour section
0117103101
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU105

Creating new native woodlands

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gordon S Patterson
1994
Provides detailed silvicultural and botanical prescriptions on a topic of immense interest. Encourages the selection of the appropriate type of new native woodland for any particular site and gives guidance on the species composition, design and silvicultural methods to promote overall development of the woodland ecosystem.
191 x 254 mm | 74 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103209
£11.00
Stock code:FCBU112

Management of forests for capercaillie in Scotland

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Nicholas Picozzi
1994
Following a decline in Capercaillie populations, this Bulletin provides a timely summary of the biology and habitat requirements of this game bird, which is primarily associated with semi-natural Scots pine forests. The structure of the forest is important, as is the presence of blaeberry both directly as food for the chicks and for supporting the many insects upon which the young also feed. Impacts of other environmental factors on Capercaillie numbers are discussed.
191 x 254 mm | 32 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103292
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU113

Forest nursery practice

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
J R Aldhous
1994
Fully revised second edition of Bulletin 43 giving a comprehensive 268 page account in 15 chapters of all aspects of forest nursery planning, practice and management. Essentially, the Bulletin describes techniques involved in the successful production of bare-rooted and cell-grown stock of the tree species most widely planted in UK forestry. Highly recommended for all forest owners, managers and forestry students.
191 x 254 mm | 268 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103233
£25.00
Stock code:FCBU111

Forest fertilisation in Britain

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
C M A Taylor
1993
In Britain the use of fertilisers has greatly increased the productivity of forests growing on nutrient-poor soils. From the early pioneering work of Stirling-Maxwell to the present day, the Forestry Commission has continually tested rates and types of fertiliser and methods of application. A pattern has gradually emerged from these empirical experiments indicating the fertiliser requirements of the main tree species planted today in Britain. This Bulletin attempts to condense this research into practical guidance for the forest manager.
0-11-710294-6
£5.75
Stock code:FCBU095
Handbook
Gary Kerr, Julian Evans
1993
Growing broadleaves for timber describes the silvicultural principles and practices involved in growing quality broadleaved timber in Britain. The aim of this Handbook is to update and expand one aspect of Forestry Commission Bulletin 62 Silviculture of broadleaved woodland, to focus attention on one single objective: growing high quality hardwood. This objective usually integrates well with others such as landscape, recreation and conservation and it is hoped that this Handbook will be of much assistance to all who are involved in managing broadleaved woodland. This Handbook is still available to order in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 95 pages | colour
0-11-710314-4
£13.50
Stock code:FCHB009

The value of birch in upland forests for wildlife conservation

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gordon S Patterson
1993
191 x 254 mm | 34 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103160
£5.95
Stock code:FCBU109
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1992
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1992.
210 x 297mm | 104 pages | colour
0 10 218793 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1992
Handbook
D.R. Williamson
1992
Diversification into new land use is now being actively encouraged for farmers and landowners facing agricultural surpluses and falling incomes. Woodland is one of the options for consideration. In the main, requirements in Britain for timber and timber products are satisfied through imports, so potential demand for British grown timber is there to be exploited. Grants to promote tree planting and woodland management provide attractive financial incentives in the early years before the timber itself becomes harvestable or the woodland matures sufficiently to provide other income-generating opportunities. Establishing Farm Woodlands gives practical guidance on how to introduce trees and woodlands successfully to fertile land that has previously been under agricultural management. This Handbook is still available to order in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 42 pages | colour |
0-11-710309-8
£6.75
Stock code:FCHB008
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1991
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1991.
210 x 297mm | 92 pages | colour
0 10 203692 6
Free
Stock code:FCAR1991

Seed manual for forest trees

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
A G Gordon
1992
A companion manual to Bulletin 59, covering all phases of seed usage of commercial forestry species from source selection, through collection, processing storage and legislation, to seed treatment and sowing.
191 x 254 mm | 132 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117102717
£10.95
Stock code:FCBU083

Woodland management for pheasants

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
P A Robertson
1992
191 x 254 mm | 18 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103152
£3.75
Stock code:FCBU106

Monitoring vegetation changes in conservation management of forests

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
Gordon S Patterson
1992
Advice is given on setting objectives and selecting appropriate parameters for measurement when monitoring vegetation for plant and species composition and habitat quality. Conservation and the encouragement of biodiversity are important objectives for forest management prescriptions that promote multi-benefit forestry. Sampling techniques, measurement methods, and data interpretation are discussed.
191 x 254 mm | 30 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103136
£3.50
Stock code:FCBU108
Handbook
M.J. Potter
1991
Treeshelters offer a convenient solution to many of the problems faced during the establishment of trees in Britain. They can reduce the losses caused by mammal damage and improve the growing environment of the young tree. But what are their limitations? Are they always the answer? This handbook, using data from over 200 Forestry Commission experiments throughout Britain, gives a balanced view of the benefits and disadvantages of treeshelters, and advises on the features required for a successful shelter. This Handbook is still available to order in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 48 pages | colour
0-11-710288-1
£5.30
Stock code:FCHB007
Handbook
B.G. Hibberd
1991
Forestry Practice has become the standard textbook for forestry students, forest and woodland growers, owners, managers and planners in Great Britain. This latest edition takes into account the considerable advances and changes in silviculture during the five years since the last edition. This includes a completely new chapter devoted to planning for second rotation plantations and greater coverage of existing woodland maintenance. Forestry Practice sets out the entire sequence of operations from plant propagation to final felling and restocking. Environmental issues are also taken into account with guidance on wildlife management and conservation, landscape design and recreation planning. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 239 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710281-4
£14.95
Stock code:FCHB006

Honey fungus

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
B J W Greig, Steve C Gregory, R G Strouts
1991
Honey fungus is one of the commonest root diseases of trees and shrubs. It is rarely a major problem in woodland, but can cause decay in standing trees. It is a more serious problem in parks, gardens, orchards and arboreta. Trees that show reasonable resistance to infection are listed, and control measures discussed.
191 x 254 mm | 10 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103012
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU100

De-icing salt damage to trees and shrubs

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
M C Dobson
1991
Damage to roadside trees caused by de-icing salt is a potentially serious and often underestimated problem. World literature on the topic is reviewed. A comprehensive list of woody plants with their reported salt tolerance rankings is presented. Methods to reduce de-icing salt damage are evaluated, and use of alternative de-icing agents discussed. Ameliorants for the treatment of salt-contaminated soil are described.
191 x 254 mm | 64 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117103020
£6.75
Stock code:FCBU101
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1991
Printed by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1990.
210 x 297 | 100 pages | colour
0 10 207591 3
Free
Stock code:FCAR1990
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1989
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1989.
210 x 297 | 104 pages | colour
0 10 202290 9
Free
Stock code:FCAR1989

Nitrogen deficiency in Sitka spruce plantations

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
C M A Taylor, Paul Tabbush
1990
0117102903
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU089

The timbers of farm woodland trees

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
J D Brazier
1990
This Bulletin describes the characteristics and uses of 15 hardwood and 8 softwood timbers of trees suitable for farm woodland planting.
0117102849
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU091

Poplars for wood production and amenity

Research Report (incl. Bulletins and Technical Papers)
J Jobling
1990
Introductory chapters cover the botanical description of poplar species and cultivars, with a guide to the field recognition of the chief poplars grown in Britain. Choice of site, silvicultural techniques and growth rates are discussed (see also Technical Paper 6). Uses of poplars and their timber are described, along with information on the main pests and diseases affecting poplars.
191 x 254 mm | 84 Pages | black & white + colour section
0117102857
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU092
Handbook
K. Broad
1989
A working knowledge of lichen ecology is important to most foresters. The study of lichens can reveal a good deal of important information about the age, health and management history of the woodlands where they are found - whether or not it is ‘ancient' woodland, for example, or the prevalence of atmospheric pollution in the area. This Handbook describes what lichens are, how they live, where they can be found and how they reproduce. It assesses the effects of various management practices on lichen abundance and species diversity, and it suggests methods by which they may be conserved. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 X 198mm | 44 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710267-9
£4.00
Stock code:FCHB004
Handbook
B.G. Hibberd
1989
Wherever trees are planted their basic needs have to be met if healthy growth is to be promoted. This Handbook gives practical advice on the establishment and subsequent management of trees and woodlands in urban and urban fringe areas. The Handbook has been designed for a wide audience, reflecting the varied disciplines and requirements involved in urban forestry. Covering principles and objectives as well as technical specifications and practical information, it may be used as a text book by students and those new to the subject, while many professionals will wish to dip into chapters dealing with their specific interests. This Handbook is still available to order in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 150 pages | colour
0-11-710273-3
£11.50
Stock code:FCHB005
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1989
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1988.
210 x 297mm | 112 pages | colour
0 10 206989 1
Free
Stock code:FCAR1988
Handbook
B.G. Hibberd
1988
Today it is possible to create woodlands which not only provide income from timber but which also fit well in to the landscape, and offer an enriched habitat for wildlife and game. To grow trees successfully so that they thrive and are an asset to the farm requires a sound knowledge of the different tree species and of their requirements and their uses. This Handbook gives essential advice on a wide range of species and methods of woodland establishment and management. A companion publication, Farm Woodland Planning (Forestry Commission Bulletin 80), provides details of costs, grants, income and regulations. Together, these give comprehensive guidance on the planting and management of farm woodlands. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 102 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710265-2
£7.50
Stock code:FCHB003
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1988
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1987.
210 x 297mm | colour
0 10 217188 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1987
Handbook
R.J. Davies
1987
Landscaped sites are often seeded with vigorous varieties ot grass and legume species, which, while reducing soil erosion and giving an attractive green appearance, may kill young trees or check their growth. Weeds compete with trees for moisture, nutrients and light; but they can also interfere by releasing toxins, modifying soil and air temperatures, and harbouring pests. Only when these processes are understood can appropriate weeding methods be selected. Trees and Weeds therefore begins with a detailed examination of the different ways in which weeds can influence young trees. The Handbook goes on to guide the forester through the various methods of weed control possible - mowing, cultivation, herbicides, mulching and alternative ground-cover species. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 X 198mm | 33 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710208-3
£2.70
Stock code:FCHB002
Handbook
D. Bevan
1987
The expansion in forestry planting since the end of the first world war has provided foresters in Britain with a great deal of fresh knowledge about the particular insect problems associated with these new habitats in different phases of crop life. Most of the 280 species described here are common subjects of enquiry, although some are relatively new exotic pests. This Handbook aims to aid recognition and enable the reader to take appropriate decisions. It is divided into two parts: the first provides a quick tool for identification and gives some idea of the forest importance or ecological significance of the species. The second part deals with the more important pest species, or groups of species, and summarises accumulated experience of their patterns of behaviour, site preference and potential for increase. Forest Insects is a valuable handbook for the naturalist as well as the field forester, manager and arboriculturist. This Handbook is no longer available in hardcopy.
210 x 198mm | 150 pages | colour | online only
0-11-710200-8
£6.95
Stock code:FCHB001
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1986
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1986.
210 x 297mm | 100 pages | colour
0 10 255486 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1986
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1985
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1985
155 x 244mm | 128 pages | colour
0 10 200186 3
Free
Stock code:FCAR1985
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1984
Published for HMSO for the year ending 31 March 1984.
155 x 244m | 125 pages | colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1984
Annual Report
1984
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1983.
155 x 244mm | 118 pages | colour
978-0-085538
Free
Stock code:FCAR1983
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1983
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1982.
155 x 244mm | 130 pages | colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1982
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1982
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1981.
155 x 244mm | 121 pages | colour
10 213682 3
Free
Stock code:FCAR1981
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1980
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1980.
155 x 244mm | 120 pages | colour
0 10 201481 7
Free
Stock code:FCAR1980
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1979
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1978.
155 x 244mm | 118 pages | colour
0 10 210879
Free
Stock code:FCAR1978
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1978
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1977.
155 x 244mm | 126 pages | colour
0 10 216878 4
Free
Stock code:FCAR1977
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1976
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1976.
155 x 244mm | 108 pages | black and white
0 10 200 177 4
Free
Stock code:FCAR1976
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1975
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1975.
155 244mm | 111pages | black and white, colour cover
0 10 020375 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1975
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1974
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1974.
155 244mm | 116 pages | black and white, colour cover
0 10 020375 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1974
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1974
Published by HMSO, for the year ended 31 March 1973.
155 x 244mm | 126 pages | black and white, colour cover
0 10 203775 2
Free
Stock code:FCAR1973
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1972
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1972.
155 x 244mm | black and white, colour cover
SBN 10 252172 7
Free
Stock code:FCAR1972
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1971
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 31 March 1971.
155 x 244mm | 104 pages | black and white
SBN 10 207072 5
Free
Stock code:FCAR1971
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1970
Published by HMSO, for the year ended 31 March 1970.
155 x 244mm | 105 pages | black and white
SBN 10 214171 1
Free
Stock code:FCAR1970
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1968
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 1966-1967
155 x 244mm | 62 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1967
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1967
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 1965-1966.
155 x 244mm | 84 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1966
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1966
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1965.
155 x 244mm | 76 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1965
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1965
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1964.
155 x 244mm | 76 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1964
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1964
Published by HMSO, by for the year ending 30 September 1963.
155 x 244mm | 80 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1963
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1963
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1962.
155 x 244mm | 76 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1962
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1962
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1961.
155 x 244mm | 81 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1961
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1961
Printed by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1960.
155 x 244mm | 74 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1960
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1960
Published by HMSO for the year ending 30 September 1959.
155 x 244mm | 86 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1959
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1959
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1958.
155 x 244mm | 86 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1958
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1958
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1957.
155 x 244mm | 94 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1957
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1957
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1956.
155 x 244mm | 100 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1956
Annual Report
Foresty Commission
1956
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1955.
155 x 244m | 94 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1955
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1955
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1954.
155 x 244mm | 97 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1954
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1954
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1953.
155 x 244mm | 84 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1953
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1953
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1952.
155 x 244mm | 88 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1952
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1952
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1951.
155 x 244mm | 84 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1951
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1951
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1950.
155 x 244mm | 76 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1950
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1950
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1949.
155 x 244mm | 155 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1949
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1949
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1948.
155 x 244mm | 70 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1948
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1948
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1947
155 x 244mm | 68 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1947
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1947
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1946.
155 x 244mm | 66 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1946
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1946
Printed by HMSO for the year ending 30 September 1945.
155 x 244mm | 52 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1945
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1945
This is an unpublished review of the work of the Forestry Commisison between 1919 and 1944.
247 x 350 mm | 68 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1919-1944
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1939
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1938.
155 x 245mm | 69 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1938
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1938
Published by HMSO for the year ending 30 September 1937.
155 x 245m | 51 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1937
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1937
Published by HMSO for the year ending 30 September 1936.
155 x 245mm | 47 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1936
Annual Report
Forestry Commissioners
1936
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1935.
155 x 245mm | 50 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1935
Annual Report
Forestry Commissioners
1935
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1934.
155 x 245mm | 110 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1934
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1934
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1933.
155 x 245mm | 44 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1933
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1932
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1931.
155 x 245mm | 46 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1931
Annual Report
Forestry Commissioner
1932
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1932.
155 x 245mm | 46 pages | black and white
978-0-085538
Free
Stock code:FCAR1932
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1931
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1930.
155 x 245mm | 42 pages | black and white
o
Free
Stock code:FCAR1930
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1930
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1929.
155 x 240mm | 75 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1929
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1929
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1928
155 x 240 mm | 38 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1928
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1928
Published by HMSO, for the year ending September 1927.
155 x 240 mm | 38 pages | balck and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1927
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1927
Published by HMSO, for the year ending September 1926.
155 x 240 mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1926
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1926
Published by HMSO, for the year ending September 1925.
155 x 240 | 34 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1925
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1925
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1924.
155 x 240 mm | 47 | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1924
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1924
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1923.
155 x 240 mm | 44 | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1923
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1923
Published HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1922.
155 x 240 mm | 39 | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1922
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1922
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1921.
155 x 240 mm | 45 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1921
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1921
Published by HMSO, for the year ending 30 September 1920.
155 x 240 mm | 63 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1920
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
1914
A joint annual report for the Forestry Branches consitituted in the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Office of Woods. Published by HMSO.
155 x 242 mm | 96 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1912-1913
Annual Report
Forestry Commission
0
Owing to war-time difficulties this report was not published.
247 x 350mm | 52 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCAR1944
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steve Lee
2017
Silver birch is second only to oak in terms of total broadleaved woodland area in Britain. In the last two decades there has been an increase in the planting of birch woodlands both for timber production and the creation of native woodlands. The GB map of Native Seed Zones and Regions of Provenance provides guidance to managers wishing to source suitable local stock when creating native woodlands, but is the local seed zone the most suitable planting stock when timber production is the objective? This Research Note presents an analysis of early-height data involving 58 silver birch provenances collected from woodlands all over Britain and the near continent, and then planted in replicated trials on eight sites in the UK. Analysis of the early height data suggests that when timber production is the objective, for which early height growth is taken as a surrogate, then local seed sources are rarely optimal. Managers interested in optimising financial return could consider planting stock from at least 2° latitude south without suffering any detrimental effect on over-all survival or increased frost-risk. The benefit of planting more southerly-based stock varied from between 24 cm and 55 cm for each degree of latitude. Managers need to be confident that the silver birch planting stock they plant now, will perform satisfactorily over the next 30–60 years and so selection now of more southerly material offers growers a potential opportunity to ‘future proof’ their planting choices.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-961-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN030
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Richard Haw
2017
Financial returns from woodland creation have traditionally been generated from sales of timber. In recent years, the voluntary carbon market has established and grown in the UK and landowners can now generate additional revenue from the sale of carbon. The sale of carbon ‘credits’ allows landowners to increase their financial returns by creating woodlands for both timber and non-timber objectives. Even at conservative yield classes and low carbon prices, woodlands can generate £400–£1300 of extra income per hectare when carbon credits are included, and much more for higher yield classes or carbon prices. The costs and benefits of woodland creation projects can vary significantly. However, this Research Note shows that, based on conservative assumptions for the five woodland types analysed here, the net present value for woodland creation increased by around 40–70% for some projects and enabled other projects to produce positive returns from the inclusion of carbon revenue. The analysis also shows that financial returns from commercial rotations can be increased by selecting a longer rotation length that will sequester more carbon. Even at low carbon prices, the extra carbon revenue generated from increasing the rotation length by five years outweighs the reduction in timber value from delayed harvesting. At higher carbon prices a further increase in rotation length could also be substantiated.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-963-5
Free
Stock code:FCRN031
Technical Note
Andrew Price, Adrian Hapca, Barry Gardiner, Elspeth Macdonald, Paul Mclean
2017
Stem straightness is important in determining tree and log value. The ability to make an effective assessment before harvesting is useful for forest managers and practitioners to improve forecasting, planning, marketing and resource use. This Technical Note describes three methods for assessing stem straightness in standing trees: visual assessment, photogrammetric measurement and terrestrial lidar. It provides basic guidance on each of the techniques and recommendations for their use. If a low cost and high speed method is required the estimates provided by visual assessment may currently be the best option. However, the visual assessment method is highly subjective and only considers a relatively small part of the saleable stem. The other two methods are computer based and directly
measure the shape of stems. The photogrammetric technique described here is highly accurate but technically demanding and time-consuming, so is currently only used for research applications. Terrestrial lidar can be used for plot-based measurements and is rapidly becoming more automated, which will considerably speed up the method and could make it more attractive to users.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-958-1
Free
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Alice Broome, Ruth J. Mitchell
2017
Ash is a widespread species which makes a substantial contribution to many landscapes. Ash trees are affected by ash dieback, a disease caused by a fungus. It is clear from the European experience of the disease that a significant number of ash trees could be lost from woodlands in the UK over the course of perhaps the next 20–30 years. The ecological implications of the loss of ash trees encompass the biodiversity supported by the tree itself, as well as the ecosystem functions the species provides. This Research Note summarises recent research on the ecological value of ash, on tree and shrub species as alternatives to ash, and on the interpretation of this information for woodland management. The ground flora community associated with ash woodland is distinct and diverse and the species exerts a significant effect on habitat composition. Other tree and shrub species which occur in UK broadleaved woodlands, or are suitable for planting there, support many ash-associated species such as lichens, insects and fungi. However, the alternative species that support most ash-associated species do not replicate the ecosystem functions provided by ash. Various options are available for broadleaved woodland management, from relying on natural succession to planting specific species or mixtures of species to meet objectives of either ash-associated species conservation or ecosystem functioning and habitat maintenance. Encouraging the establishment of alternative tree and shrub species that are ecologically similar to ash may offer options to mitigate against the ecological implications of ash loss.
A4 | colour | 16 pages
978-0-085538-959-8
Free
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Alice Broome, R.J. Fuller, P.E. Bellamy, M.P. Eichhorn, R.M.A. Gill, R. Harmer, G. Kerr, G.M. Siriwardena
2017
This research consisted of a literature review and field study which investigated woodland management for birds within lowland broadleaved woodlands in Britain. The research considered the effect of woodland management (silvicultural intervention and control of deer browsing) on vegetation structure, and the relationships between vegetation structure and woodland birds. Based on habitat–bird relationships, a classification of six woodland stand structures (A–F) related to their value to birds, and a framework to help understand and manage woodland development to deliver these structures were created. The field study, which was conducted in England and Wales, showed that woodlands are predominantly mature or late thicket stands, with low structural heterogeneity (type E – closed canopy, few strata), and silvicultural interventions are primarily mid to late rotational thinning. Such interventions lead to a uniform stand structure and reduced stem and understorey density. High deer browsing pressure also reduces understorey density. Study results showed these vegetation structures to be less favourable to the target bird species who were instead found to be associating with the structures predicted from the literature as being favourable. This suggests that vegetation structures for birds can be described, and if provided, bird populations could be enhanced. The frequently occurring woodland structure type E is of least value to woodland birds. Woodland managers are encouraged to move type E stands towards other types to help meet bird conservation objectives.
A4 | 12 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-957-4
Free
Stock code:FCRN028
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
David Gil-Moreno, Dan Ridley-Ellis, Paul McLean
2016
The softwood processing sector in Great Britain has been built around the use of a very small number of timber-producing species – predominantly Sitka spruce. The recent increase in outbreaks of host-specific tree pests and diseases has led to an interest in diversification, through planting a wider range of tree species, to mitigate any risk to the softwood resource. However, there is a lack of evidence about how this diversification will impact on the future merchantability of timber. This Research Note investigates the structural timber properties of noble fir, Norway spruce, western red cedar and western hemlock grown in Great Britain and compares the results with published values for British-grown Sitka spruce. The study was carried out using timber from even-aged plantations growing in a range of latitudes representative of productive conifer forests. Twenty-seven trees per species were felled, processed into structural-sized battens, kiln dried and destructively tested in a laboratory according to current European standards. Characteristic values of mechanical properties and density were determined and indicative yields for different strength classes were calculated. The results showed that all of the species investigated can produce structural timber, but that western red cedar has the least desirable properties for this purpose. Some further work is under way in order to investigate the effect of rotation length on the timber properties of these species.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-952-9
Free
Stock code:FCRN026
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Pat Snowdon, Amy Binner, Greg Smith, Matthew Agarwala, Brett Day, Ian Bateman, Amii Harwood
2017
This Research Note is based on a review by the University of Exeter that evaluated existing knowledge on valuing the social and environmental contributions of British trees and woodlands. It starts by bringing together different (but related) economic terms and concepts in a single framework for understanding how trees and woodlands contribute to economic well-being, then sets out some guiding principles that distinguish this area of study. Tables are used to categorise and to summarise the evidence base of the social and environmental contributions (including consideration of decision support tools and a separate assessment for urban trees). A further table summarises priorities for future research, both to fill gaps in understanding and to develop more advanced techniques and models. The Note concludes that much work has been done on valuing the flows of social and environmental goods and services from trees and woodlands in Britain. A substantial evidence base has developed, particularly in relation to open-access recreation and climate change mitigation. However, major gaps remain in other areas including the role of woodlands in flood alleviation, water quality, physical and mental health, and biodiversity. The Note highlights the need for sound underpinning science and the need for more integrated approaches to valuation, assessment and decision-making tools. Future research efforts should focus on areas where significant additions to existing evidence are realistic and where effort will provide the greatest benefits for policy and operational decision-making.

The full review undertaken by the University of Exeter is also available to download as a Research Report.

A4 | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-956-7
Free
Stock code:FCRN027
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
John Calladine, Alice Broome, Robert J. Fuller
2016
Stand structure is an important determinant of habitat quality for forest biodiversity and is influenced by management. In conifer plantations, the varied structure created within a stand by continuous cover forestry (CCF) systems has been expected to be better for woodland birds than the range of discrete stand structures created through rotations of clearfelling and replanting (CFR). This study compared the number of breeding bird species (species richness) and their abundance within Sitka spruce stands which have been managed under CCF and by CFR. The study showed that species richness within CCF stands was higher than in CFR but young growth stages of CFR were important for some birds. Bird species richness is further influenced by the presence of a woody understorey or scrub vegetation structure. When stand types were ranked by species richness alone, CCF with a shrubby understorey was the most species rich, followed by CCF without a shrubby understorey, with young CFR and then older CFR being the least species rich. Modelling scenarios were used to test the effect of changing proportions of CCF and CFR in the landscape on the abundance of selected species. Designing a landscape which includes both CFR and CCF could prove to be a strategy for achieving optimal bird richness and abundance, as conditions for scrub-dependent species and the high structural diversity important for bird species associated with older stands are maintained.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-951-2
Free
Stock code:FCRN025
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Nadia Barsoum, Laura Henderson
2016
Planted forests of non-native conifers make up around 36% of Britain’s total wooded area. Increasing the area of native woodlands – including converting non-native conifer to native woodland where appropriate – is an aim of the UK Forestry Standard Guidelines on Biodiversity. It is unclear how much conversion is being implemented, what the motivations might be, or how it is achieved in practice. This study used literature review and questionnaire-based approaches to explore the benefits and drawbacks of conversion, and also to evaluate the attitudes towards, and experiences of, conversion. A majority of respondents are currently, or planning to be, engaged in converting non-native conifer forest management units to native woodland. A range of methods are practised, which aim towards either partial or complete conversion. The level of effort and cost required for conversion varies with local site conditions and/or the proximity of native woodland from which colonisation processes can occur. Some managers whose primary objective is timber production are concerned that conversion will result in a reduction in levels of productivity, which leads to a reluctance to pay for the process of conversion, especially where competition, herbivory and biosecurity threats to native tree species are a potential issue. In contrast, those managers whose primary objective is conservation appear prepared to invest time and resources converting their woodlands. However, many woodland managers are reluctant to undertake large-scale conversion without more guidance and evidence of the benefits.
A4 | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-948-2
Free
Stock code:FCRN024
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Alice Broome
2016
Conifer seed provides an important food resource for many woodland mammals, birds and insects, including some of Britain’s rarest species. This Research Note brings together information from a number of sources on cone and seed production by the main conifers planted in Britain. This information can help managers assess the seed resources of their woodlands and manage the woods for the objective of seed production, whether for food or to encourage natural regeneration. Cone and seed crops fluctuate annually and the amount of seed available in good compared with bad seed years, as well as the frequency of good years, depends on a range of factors which include tree species, age of the crop and climatic conditions. Some species such as Scots pine produce moderate but consistent crops of seed every year, whereas others are much more variable. For example, in a good year Japanese larch can provide the greatest amount of seed and energy per area of woodland of any conifer species grown in Britain, whereas in a poor year production is almost negligible. The time of year when seed is released differs between conifer species. Woodland management can influence the continuity of seed supply as well as the quantities of cones and seed produced. Managing to provide a continuous and abundant seed resource involves consideration of woodland age structure and species composition as well as choice of appropriate interventions.
A4 | 12 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-947-5
Free
Stock code:FCRN023
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
David Wainhouse, Daegan J.G. Inward
2016
Predicting future risks of damage by insect pests is an important aspect of forest management. Climate change has the potential to affect forest pests and their impact on trees through higher temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, and more frequent extreme weather events. Warmer temperatures are likely to have complex effects on insects, influencing, among other things, development rate and the seasonal timing of life-cycle events, while also affecting their host trees and natural enemies. It is not possible to predict the future impact of forest pests with any precision, but some generalisations can be made based on the ecological characteristics of different insect types. The damage caused by aphids and related insects is likely to increase as the climate warms. Higher temperatures will increase their reproductive rate, and drought stress of host trees may increase their susceptibility to aphid attack. The impact of bark beetles and related insects is also likely to increase, due to factors such as increased frequency of windblows, drought stress of host trees and, for some species, a shorter generation time. Effects upon defoliators are more difficult to predict, but the abundance and impact of some species is likely to be influenced by an increase in the number of generations per year and changes in their geographical distribution. Changes in forest management as a response to climate change, such as the introduction of new tree species, could additionally lead to the emergence of new pests.
A4 | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538_940-6
Free
Stock code:FCRN021
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
N. Barsoum, R. Gill, L. Henderson, A. Peace, C. Quine, V. Saraev, G. Valatin
2016
This Research Note presents the findings of a study which examined how biodiversity changes with stand age, with a view to incorporating it into optimal forest rotation length modelling. The study reviewed relevant literature and analysed Forestry Commission Biodiversity Assessment Project data. The review revealed no simple or universal response of biodiversity to stand age. However, there was more evidence of biodiversity increasing with stand age than falling (or not changing) and, with regard to habitat requirements for birds and mammals in British forests, there is evidence that after a brief initial increase, biodiversity declines until around 20 years and thereafter increases again. While only a limited number of economic models were found which linked biodiversity and rotation length, two distinct approaches to such work were identified: first, a direct approach which accounts for biodiversity values when estimating net present values and, second, an indirect approach which employs biodiversity management constraints in the modelling. The data analysis also revealed, in most cases, no evidence of significant changes in biodiversity with stand age. Upland Sitka spruce stands were an exception, where biodiversity levels were higher in young forests and again in more mature forests and at a minimum at around 40 years old. Overall, the study found that both the ecological evidence linking biodiversity and stand age and the economic modelling accounting for that linkage are limited. Therefore, a substantial challenge remains to incorporate biodiversity into rotation length models, and recommendations are made to address this.
A4 | colour | 10 pages | online only
978-0-85538-944-4
Free
Stock code:FCRN022
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Louise Sing, Duncan Ray, Kevin Watts
2015
The ecosystem services concept helps describe the benefits which humans receive from nature and natural processes in a way that can influence policy and management decision making. The ability of trees, woodlands and forests to provide a wide range of ecosystem services is very much dependent on where they are located and how they are managed. Characterising, assessing and valuing ecosystem services can support forest management in a number of ways. These include demonstrating the human and societal goods and services which trees, woodlands and forests provide; supporting the prioritisation of management activities by articulating forest management outcomes as trade-offs in ecosystem services; and considering whether the configuration and management of woodlands is sufficiently robust to meet potential changes in the future demand for ecosystem services, and is resilient to projected climate change. This Research Note provides an introduction to the ecosystem services framework by explaining the concepts of characterisation, assessment and valuation, and the links to sustainable forest management through the UK Forestry Standard. It presents the findings of a series of workshops, held by Forest Research during 2011, which identified the priority ecosystem services for policy and practice from trees, woodlands and forests as timber and fuel production, carbon sequestration, flood mitigation, water quality, health and recreation, and biodiversity.
A4 | Colour | 10 pages | online only
978-0-85538-929-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN020
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Mandy Cook
2015
This Research Note is based on a PhD research study ‘Forests as places of mental well-being: the meaning and use of urban forests by people with early-stage dementia’. The study examines and develops ways for people with dementia (especially those in the early stages) to engage with nature, and with other people, in the context of trees, woodlands and forests. Initial results from the study found that a pilot programme of activities, led by Forestry Commission Scotland rangers in an urban woodland setting, provided an overwhelmingly positive experience for people with early-stage dementia, by offering meaningful experiences that contributed to well-being and feelings of self-worth. The woodland environment also provided a ‘library’ of resources and stimulation. The programme helped people with early-stage dementia remain active and connected within the community, enabling them to maintain their independence for as long as possible, and provided support for carers. Such programmes can be seen as a new and innovative way of engaging with people with early-stage dementia, which could complement traditional therapeutic interventions. As the Note stresses, an ‘end of the road’ approach to people with dementia is no longer acceptable. We need to explore more ways of providing care with an emphasis on empowerment and maintaining the best possible quality of life. It is hoped that this Note will provide a valuable resource, not only for people who manage woodlands and other green spaces, but also for health-care professionals.

Dementia and woodland environment case studies

A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-926-0
Free
Stock code:FCRN019
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Darren Moseley, Gregory Valatin
2014
Evidence indicates that woodland creation is generally a cost-effective method of climate change mitigation, when compared with a range of alternatives. However, engaging landowners and land managers in woodland creation schemes can sometimes prove difficult, and this affects prospects for meeting national woodland planting targets and associated climate change mitigation objectives. Although reluctance to plant woodland is often attributed to the low financial attractiveness of such schemes, wider factors – including long-held cultural views on changing land use and perceptions of the urgency of tackling climate change – can also be important. Insights from behavioural economics indicate that individuals are influenced by a number of cognitive factors in making decisions and that certain ‘nudges’ may help direct choices in a particular direction. Nudges are ways of influencing people’s choices without limiting the options, or appreciably altering their relative costs. There is a range of nudge type approaches that could be used to encourage woodland creation for climate change mitigation. These include addressing perceived barriers to woodland creation, encouraging private woodland creation by highlighting successes and by the public sector leading by example. Implementation of nudge type approaches should be tailored towards different types of landowners and land managers, who may vary in their attitudes, motivations and willingness to plant trees.

Related Research Report - Behavioural policy 'nudges' to encourage woodland creation for climate change mitigation

A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-917-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN018
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Sarah Green, Bridget Laue, Reuben Nowell, Heather Steele
2014
Horse chestnut is an important amenity tree species which has been significantly affected over the past decade by a widespread outbreak of bleeding canker disease. Symptoms include rust-coloured or blackened bleeding cankers on the stem and branches, which can lead to tree mortality. The causal agent of this disease is the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. aesculi, which is believed to have originated in India on Indian horse chestnut. Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction diagnostic test for P. syringae pv. aesculi has enabled its rapid detection in symptomatic trees and provides a useful tool for studying host infection and survival outside the host. The pathovar can survive in soil for up to one year and can tolerate lengthy periods of freezing. To better understand the evolutionary history and genetic make-up of this aggressive tree-infecting bacterium, draft genome sequences were generated for seven isolates of P. syringae pv. aesculi from Europe, and a type strain from India. Genomic comparisons suggest that this bacterium probably spread to Europe in the early 2000s via an unknown pathway, with the epidemic across several countries resulting from the introduction of a single bacterial strain. Future genomic comparisons with other P. syringae pathovars combined with functional analyses of genetic pathways should help unravel the key host–pathogen interactions that underlie bacterial diseases of trees.
A4 | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-909-3
Free
Stock code:FCRN017
Practice Note
Jason Hubert, Joan Cottrell
2014
Conserving the genetic diversity within our tree species and the processes that determine it are important for sustainable forest management and increasing the resilience of Britain’s forests and woodlands. The genetic diversity within a tree species at any one time is the result of many dynamic processes, and it provides the source for future adapted trees and woodlands. Its importance is recognised in The UK Forestry Standard and forestry practitioners are encouraged to consider genetic diversity when managing forests and woodlands. One method of genetic conservation is to manage specific areas with the intention of allowing the full cycle of natural processes to occur. These areas are called gene conservation units. This Practice Note sets out what you need to do to establish a gene conservation unit and describes the recommended management approaches. Many woodlands may already be managed in a way that would make them suitable, but a more formal recognition of a network of gene conservation units allows for a more robust and quantifiable approach. The approach described here allows for a consistent method of selecting and describing units across the full range of a species and is compatible with the approach promoted across Europe.
A4 | 6 pages | colour
978-0-85538-897-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN021
Practice Note
Gail Atkinson, Kieron Doick
2014
The regeneration of brownfield land to green space can deliver multiple benefits to society and the environment through improvements in the quality of a site and its surrounding landscape. Successful delivery of regeneration projects is dependent on the planning of project delivery and on good project management. This Practice Note describes the process of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt from past projects, and provide guidance to practitioners so that they avoid common pitfalls. It may also be used in the regeneration of brownfield land to other green and open space. The Note details each of the main stages of the regeneration process and the tasks associated with each stage. It also describes the role of the project delivery team and the disciplines needed for project delivery. Where a project has already started, guidance in this Note can help consolidate and refine existing project plans to improve project delivery and the likelihood of producing sustainable woodland. Aimed at those who plan and deliver brownfield regeneration to woodland projects, this Note supports project delivery planning and should be used by all members of the project delivery team.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-898-0
Free
Stock code:FCPN022
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
T R Nisbet
2014
Forests and forest management practices can affect surface water acidification in a number of ways. The primary mechanism is the ability of tree canopies to capture more sulphur and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. Pollutant scavenging is expected to have peaked in the 1970s when emissions were greatest and led to surface waters draining catchments dominated by forestry being more acidic. The introduction of emission control policies in the 1980s has achieved major improvements in air quality and studies show forest sites to be recovering in line with their moorland counterparts. However, forest streams remain more impacted, requiring continued restrictions on new tree planting and restocking. Tree planting can influence acidification by the scavenging of acid deposition, base cation uptake, the scavenging and concentration of sea salts, soil drying and the formation of an acid litter layer at the soil surface. Cultivation, drainage and road building, fertiliser use, felling and harvesting, and restocking also have effects. This Research Note considers each of these factors in turn and assesses the role of tree species, planting scale and design. It covers the identification and protection of vulnerable areas, use of critical load and site impact assessments, research and monitoring, and measures to promote recovery. Continued monitoring will be essential to demonstrate whether current measures remain fit for purpose and guide the development of good practice.
A4 | 16 pages | colour
978-0-85538-900-0
Free
Stock code:FCRN016
Practice Note
James Ogilvie, Kevin Lafferty
2013
Forests and woodlands bring wide-ranging and diverse benefits to people in Scotland. They are ideal places for people of all ages to participate in leisure, recreation and sports. However, forests are also workplaces. Forestry is an important part of the rural economy, and the production of timber provides revenue for landowners and jobs for the forestry sector and related businesses. Harvesting and haulage operations have been expanding over the past few years, as the forests that were established last century reach maturity, and so the need to balance woodland access with the need for safety during forest operations has never been more important. This is both to comply with health and safety legislation and fulfil land access obligations. Managing woodland access and forest operations is a pragmatic and practical process, involving land managers and access authorities, so that forest operations can take place safely, with minimal disruption to public access and recreational users. This Practice Note sets out clear steps to achieve this aim, including advice on early engagement with stakeholders and careful planning of operations. It is aimed at landowners and managers, forestry practitioners and operators, access authorities and recreation bodies.
A4 | colour | 8 pages
978-0-85538-893-5
Free
Stock code:FCPN104
Practice Note
Paul Haworth, Alan Fielding
2013
Golden eagles are primarily birds of open mountain country but they can use open woodland habitats and may benefit from prey species which use woodlands. In 2010 a suite of six new Special Protection Areas (SPAs) covering 360,000 ha were designated by the Scottish Government for the conservation of golden eagles, adding to the existing eight SPA sites in Scotland for this species. Around 28% of the UK golden eagle population lives in these protected areas. This Practice Note reviews the evidence for how golden eagles may be affected by woodland expansion in their breeding territories, and gives interim guidance on how to plan for woodland planting proposals within the protected areas to make them compatible with their golden eagle conservation objectives.
A4 | colour | 11 pages | online only
978-0-85538-889-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN103
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Anna Lawrence, Bianca Ambrose-Oji
2013
Community woodland groups are growing, and there are now over 650 groups in England, Scotland and Wales. The rise is the result of both social pressure and changes in policy. Groups are keen to learn from each other’s experiences, and policy stakeholders seek evidence of the effectiveness of past and current policy. While some experiences have been documented, many others have not, and evidence is available in a variety of forms that are difficult to compare. There is therefore a need for a consistent approach to describing the dimensions of a community woodland model that supports the documentation of case studies. This will provide the basis for a robust and comparable body of evidence, to enable comparisons between case studies, and between different points in time within a single case study. This rigorous approach to description will also help with evaluation and impact assessment of different approaches to community-delivered forestry. For some uses, such as national counts of community woodland groups, it will be important to carefully define a ‘community woodland group’; for others it is more important to leave the definition open, so that the method can document case studies of interest to a wide range of users. With the publication of this method, we invite fellow researchers and practitioners to join us in producing a robust shared evidence base.
A4 | 16 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-890-4
Free
Stock code:FCRN015
Practice Note
Nigel A Straw, Christine Tilbury, David Williams
2013
The oak processionary moth is a serious forestry pest that is capable of causing complete defoliation of oak trees. Its caterpillars are also a hazard to health. Breeding populations of the moth were discovered for the first time in the UK in London in 2006 and these initial infestations have since spread and the moth has become more widely established. Controlling the moth is important, to protect trees from defoliation that can lead to decline and tree death, and to prevent risks to health. Control measures are most effective when applied at an early stage, before populations have started to increase. Effective control depends on monitoring the spread of the moth and detecting new outbreaks as soon as these arise, and also keeping track of abundance in areas where it is known to be present. There are a number of methods that can be used for monitoring but one of the most effective methods is to use pheromone traps. This Practice Note describes how these traps are used to capture oak processionary moths and what to do when moths are caught. It is aimed at forest and woodland managers, forestry practitioners, local authority tree and woodland officers, arboriculturalists and others who are actively involved with managing oak trees.
A4 | colour | 8 pages
978-0-85538-888-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN020
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Matt Parratt, Richard Jinks
2013
Direct seeding can be a useful method for creating new woodland on former agricultural sites. However, the success of the technique is variable when it is used to restore conifer plantation sites to native species. Seed predation by small mammals, particularly the wood mouse, has been identified as a factor potentially limiting success. Small mammals are known to exhibit preferential predation when presented with a range of tree and shrub seeds. This research demonstrated that, when seeds used in the direct seeding of woodlands were presented on the soil surface, small mammals showed a preference for large-seeded species such as oak, hazel, beech and sycamore. In the case of oak, the removal of seeds by predators was rapid and total, usually in less than 24 hours. Smaller-seeded species and those with greater physical protection were significantly less likely to be taken. The results showed that the pattern of preference remained consistent between several different sites. The burial of seeds is known to reduce predation by reducing the chance of seeds being detected and increasing the time required for predators to find and remove them. In our experiments, burial restricted predation to just the highly-preferred species while less-preferred species were left almost untouched. However, burial also significantly reduced predation risk overall.
A4 leaflet | 4 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-877-5
Free
Stock code:FCRN013
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Claire Stevenson
2013
Understanding the role of the landscape matrix in species dispersal is important when targeting conservation and management strategies. This Research Note shows how least-cost modelling was used to assess invasive grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis dispersal movements within the UK, with a focus on the county of Cumbria. Two major networks were identified separated by the Cumbrian Mountain range. This indicated that there may be multiple colonisation routes into the county. These findings were supported by evidence from DNA sequencing of seven grey squirrel populations. Least-cost model predictions were further validated through data from five global positioning system (GPS) collared grey squirrels. Buffered least-cost path analysis and the development of a least-cost corridor model enabled the most likely grey squirrel dispersal routes to be identified and validated using GPS data. To provide information on movements and land cover use, the individual movements of each squirrel were assessed. A case study was then used to highlight how the validated least-cost model can be applied to areas where red squirrels Sciurus vulgaris are still threatened by the invasive grey squirrel to provide information to target management and conservation actions. The findings should influence management strategies for grey squirrel control and conservation of the native red squirrels.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-879-9
Free
Stock code:FCRN014
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Kieron Doick
2013
A well-known effect of urbanisation is the warming of the local climate relative to surrounding rural areas, creating a phenomenon known as the ‘urban heat island’ (UHI). UHI intensity varies across a city and over time, but temperature differences may reach 9 °C in the UK. Factors that contribute to a UHI include the thermal properties, height and spacing of buildings, the production of waste heat, air pollution, and differences in land cover and albedo. The UHI effect is important as heat-related stress accounts for around 1100 premature deaths per year in the UK – increasing noticeably in exceptionally hot years. An estimated 8–11 extra deaths occur each day for each degree increase in air temperature during UK summer heatwaves. As the occurrence and intensity of extreme heat events is set to increase under the changing climate predicted for the UK, there are significant implications for the thermal comfort and health of city dwellers across many parts of the UK. UHI abatement is of significance to those engaged in the development and delivery of climate change adaptation plans, including urban planners, policy makers and health professionals. Urban planning, building design and landscaping can all provide strategies for mitigating the UHI. Vegetation has a key role to play in contributing to the overall temperature regulation of cities. Informed selection and strategic placement of trees and green infrastructure can reduce the UHI and cool the air by between 2 ºC and 8 ºC, reducing heat-related stress and premature human deaths during high-temperature events.
A4 | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-878-2
Free
Stock code:FCRN012
Practice Note
Forestry Commission
2012
The great spruce bark beetle is found in forests throughout continental Europe. It damages spruce trees by tunnelling into the bark of the living trees to lay its eggs under the bark. The developing larvae feed on the inner woody layers, which weakens, and in some cases may kill, the tree. The beetle was first discovered in Britain in 1982 after it was accidentally introduced – most likely via a consignment of imported timber. It has become an established pest in the west of England and Wales but more recently it has expanded its range to southern Scotland. The good news for forest managers is that the beetle can be effectively managed by the controlled release of its natural predator Rhizophagus grandis. This Practice Note provides managers with a framework for assessing the risks to forests and advice on what to look out for if trees are affected. Guidance is given on the control techniques that have been developed to minimise the impact of the beetle and what action should be taken if the beetle is found.
A4 leaflet | colour | 8 pages
978-0-085538-872-0
Free
Stock code:FCPN017
Practice Note
Steve Lee, Guy Watt
2012
Over 90% of the Sitka spruce planted in Britain today is from ‘improved’ planting stock, which is predicted to produce around 25% more timber at final rotation, compared with material imported from the Pacific North West. Forest managers have a choice of improved stock: seedlings raised from seed collected in orchards established around 25 years ago, or rooted cuttings taken from stock plants raised in nurseries using controlled pollinated seed produced by tree breeders. Although the predicted gains in growth rate often appear similar, the predicted gains for quality traits are usually superior for the rooted cutting stock. The down side is that the rooted cuttings are usually more expensive due to the extra production costs at the nursery. Which planting stock gives the best financial return in the long run is dependent on a number of variables. This Practice Note provides guidance to forest managers on how to choose the most appropriate planting stock, depending on thinning regime, rotation length, growth rate, and economic factors such as the premium paid for rooted cutting stock at the time of planting and the likely premium for green logs at harvest.
A4 leaflet | colour | 6 pages | online only
978-0-085538-875-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN018
Technical Note
Roger Trout, Kenny Kortland
2012
Collisions with fences can be a significant source of mortality for woodland birds such as capercaillie and black grouse. The construction of new fencing to protect woodland and trees in habitats supporting these two grouse species should be minimised, and the fences removed as soon as management objectives have been achieved. Fences that are necessary to protect young trees from high deer populations should be well marked to make them more visible to flying birds, thereby reducing the number of collisions. This Note describes options for marking both new and existing deer and stock fences, and provides information on materials and methods of attachment. The choice of marking technique will require consideration of the visibility of the marking material to capercaillie and black grouse, the ability of the material to cope with wind exposure, and the costs of the material and installation. A balance needs to be struck between the creation of a highly visible barrier, the practicability of sustaining the fence for its principal purpose, and the overall cost. The guidance in this Note applies to Capercaillie Core Areas in Scotland and all areas where black grouse are present.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-837-7
Free
Stock code:FCTN019
Practice Note
Forestry Commission
2013
Everyone involved in forestry work has health and safety duties and responsibilities. This Practice Note provides guidance to help landowners, forest managers and forestry practitioners manage public safety on harvesting sites. Forest operations are high-risk activities, and the management issues involved in harvesting and hauling timber while maintaining public access to forests and woodlands can be complex. There are a number of tasks that have to be undertaken – both during planning and while carrying out operations – to ensure that people’s health and safety is not put at risk. This Note sets out the different roles and responsibilities for managing public safety to ensure that activities on and around harvesting worksites are co-ordinated and the right tasks are carried out by the right people. It provides information and advice on suitable control measures and illustrates good practice through the use of scenarios. The guidance was first published in 2001 by the Forestry and Arboriculture Safety Training Council (FASTCo).
A4 | colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-876-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN019
Technical Note
Alan Dickerson, Bruce Nicoll, Mike Perks
2013
The management of forests and woodlands requires an effective road network to provide access for the machinery required to plant and harvest trees and extract timber and wood products. Roads are also used by visitors for access and activities such as cycling and mountain biking. Forest roads and bridges must be constructed so that they are fit for purpose and robust enough to cope with intensive forest operations. However, building and maintaining road networks uses energy and releases carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – from the disturbance of soil for new roads and the quarrying of materials to the emissions from construction vehicles. It is important that these emissions are reduced wherever possible by following good practice in construction and by minimising soil disturbance, especially on sites with peaty soils. This Technical Note describes how the greenhouse gas release from forest civil engineering operations can be controlled and reduced, while still ensuring the development and maintenance of a robust forest road network. It is aimed at forest civil engineers, planners, managers and owners.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-891-1
Free
Stock code:FCTN020
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Ralph Harmer
2011
During the 20th century large areas of ancient semi-natural woodland were converted to conifer plantations, creating sites now termed PAWS (Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites). Restoration of these sites to native woodland is a current objective of forestry policy throughout Great Britain. Natural regeneration is often regarded as the preferred method for restocking PAWS but it is a generally unpredictable process and some native species are very difficult to regenerate. A survey of western hemlock PAWS, carried out to identify which species were regenerating and how much of each was present, found a wide range of species either as seedlings or saplings, but at many sites the regeneration was predominantly birch. There were significant relationships between some site characteristics and the occurrence of regeneration, with the presence of nearby parents being especially important. Although there were often large numbers of seedlings present, most were small and patchily distributed, and the proportion of each site stocked with natural regeneration was low. A simple method for determining the proportion of a site stocked is described. While timber species such as oak and beech were regenerating, both seedling numbers and the areas of each site stocked were low. This indicates that natural regeneration may be an inadequate method of restocking and that planting may be required if an objective of management is to produce a good final crop of timber.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-851-5
Free
Stock code:FCRN011
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Amy Eycott, Kevin Watts
2011
Maintaining species’ movement around landscapes is considered important if we are to conserve populations of many species and help them adapt to climate change. Particular features in the landscape have the potential to hinder or facilitate species movement. As each species interacts with the landscape differently, it can be hard to extract general patterns to include in planning and management guidance. This Research Note draws information together to look for such patterns. Firstly, we conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature. This relatively new technique in environmental sciences allowed a quantitative meta-analysis of specific types of evidence, as well as a traditional qualitative synthesis of the wider information available on UK species. Our review confirmed that, for those species for which there is evidence, most prefer to move through landscape features similar in structure to their breeding habitat. For example, woodland species tend to prefer to move through habitats which have some elements of vertical structure. However, we also established that species are idiosyncratic and their responses have various behavioural causes. For example, some landscape features that have a contrasting structure with a species’ breeding habitat may provide better shelter from predators, while others may act as good visual cues for navigation. Secondly, we summarise species-based landscape ecological studies carried out by Forest Research over the past few years.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-850-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN010
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Andy J Moffat, T R Nisbet
2011
The removal of tree stumps and coarse roots from felling sites as a source of woody biomass for bioenergy generation is well established in parts of Europe, and interest has been expressed in replicating this practice in some regions of the UK. Overseas research shows that stump harvesting can pose a risk to sustainable forest management, unless care is taken in site selection and operational practice. Poor practice can lead to detrimental effects on soil structure, increasing the risk of soil erosion, and depletes soil nutrient and carbon capital. Stump and root harvesting can also have impacts on woodland biodiversity, archaeological heritage and tree health. This Research Note offers a synthesis of available evidence on the effects of stump harvesting, drawn from largely overseas sources but critically considered for their applicability to British conditions. The overall environmental effects of stump harvesting on forest sites in the UK, and the relative magnitude of these effects compared with conventional restock site preparation, are under ongoing investigation. The results will be used to develop more definitive guidance. Preliminary guidance published by Forest Research sets out how the risks of potential damaging effects can be minimised, notably by careful assessment of site suitability and location of activities on low risk sites. It is recommended that this is used to guide the planning and location of stump and root harvesting operations in Britain.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-847-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN009
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Vadims Sarajevs
2011
Street trees and urban woodlands provide a number of environmental and social benefits, including contributing to climate change adaptation and mitigation and providing urban green space. This Note presents the results of a review of three approaches to estimating the amenity value of street trees: CAVAT, Helliwell and i-Tree.
6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-818-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN008
Practice Note
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
White-tailed eagles (sea eagles) were re-introduced to Scotland from the 1970s and there are now over 50 breeding pairs. They frequently nest and roost in woodlands and tend to use habitual nest sites. The species has a high degree of legal protection, and woodland managers need to plan operations carefully to avoid disturbing the birds or damaging their nests. During the breeding season, between 1 February and 31 August, most forestry operations and activities should be avoided or severely restricted within 250 m of an active nest. Depending on circumstances, it may be possible to carry out a range of management and recreational activities between 250 m and 500 m from an active nest without risk of disturbance. At other times, activities up to and around nest sites may normally be carried out with little risk of disturbance, although habitually-used nests themselves are protected from damage and destruction, even when not in use. At any time, birds should be protected from repeated disturbance (harassment), for example at roost sites, as this is also an offence.
A4 leaflet | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-826-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN101
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Katherine King
2010
This Research Note summarises in-depth research conducted with young people as part of the Active England project at Bedgebury Forest, Kent.
6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-820-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN007
Practice Note
W L Mason
2010
Dense natural regeneration of Sitka spruce and other conifers is an increasingly common feature of both recently clearfelled sites and stands managed under continuous cover forestry in upland forests of the British Isles. This regeneration can be managed by combining natural self-thinning in the early stages of stand
establishment with management intervention to cut access racks and carry out selective respacing to favour the best quality trees. The target density should be about 2000–2500 stems per hectare in young regeneration or on windfirm sites where thinning will take place. On less stable sites that are unlikely to be thinned, a single intervention to a target density of 1750–2000 stems per hectare should improve mean tree diameter without compromising timber quality. Managing natural regeneration in continuous cover forestry or mixed stands can be based upon similar principles but the growth of the regenerated trees will be more variable.
A4 leaflet | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-804-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN016
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Duncan Ray, Mark Broadmeadow, James Morison
2010

The changing climate presents a challenge for forest planning and forest management in England because the projected increases in temperature, changes in the seasonality of rainfall, and an increased frequency of extreme events add complexity to species selection and silvicultural practice. By actively adjusting forest management now, to anticipate future changes, we can hope to increase resilience by reducing exposure to risks in forestry and in the goods and services that woodlands provide for society. Tree growth will increase in some areas and decline in others, and the effects will vary with species. Some relatively less known species will become more suitable – including some from other continents and current climates more similar to those projected for England. New approaches to woodland management will be required to address the threats of drought and increased risk of damage from pests, diseases, wind and fire. There are many uncertainties associated with climate change, and the likely impact on trees, silviculture and forest operations. This uncertainty should not prevent adaptation but, instead, should direct woodland managers to implement measures that increase resilience whatever climate change brings, or that are likely to reap the greatest rewards in the future. A key concept in managing risk is diversification: from broadening the choice of genetic material and mixing tree species in different ways, to varying management systems and the timing of operations.

A4 leaflet | 16 pages | colour
978-0-85538-810-2
Free
Stock code:FCRN201
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Russell Anderson
2010
The value of peat bogs as open habitats and stores of carbon may be lost if they are planted with trees. The number of bogs being restored is increasing but still modest in scale relative to the area of afforested peatland. Research is currently being carried out to determine the feasibility and methodology for restoring afforested bogs. Two experiments were set up to compare a range of methods for managing trees and drainage. In the blanket bog experiment, treatments that involved both felling trees and damming plough furrows were more successful than others in terms of raising the water table. Bog vegetation recovered rapidly in the felled treatments, particularly those with furrows dammed. In the lowland raised bog experiment, the water table rose dramatically in all treatments. Only during a prolonged dry summer was there a difference between treatments, the water table falling deeper in the whole-tree removal than in the fell-to-waste treatment, with conventional harvesting intermediate. Bog vegetation recovered best in the whole-tree removal treatments and least well in the fell-to-waste treatments. Felling is necessary for restoring afforested bogs, but removing lop and top is not. Damming plough furrows can help to restore blanket bog but damming main drains may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked. Tree seedlings often colonise bogs undergoing restoration – removing brash mats after harvesting and periodic maintenance should reduce this problem.
A4 leaflet | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-796-9
Free
Stock code:FCRN006
Practice Note
Sandra Denman
2010
Oak trees in Britain have long suffered from dieback disorders but a new disease called acute oak decline is currently causing particular concern. A typical symptom of the disease is dark, sticky fluid bleeding from small cracks in the bark on the trunk of the tree. This stem bleeding may be extensive, with as many as 20 or more bleeding patches on an infected tree, and the canopy may become thin as the tree approaches death. Some trees die within four or five years of the onset of symptoms. Bacteria are thought to be the cause of the stem bleeds and tests to confirm this are underway. Currently, the condition appears to be most prevalent in the English Midlands but cases have also been reported in Wales. Woodland managers should survey, record and monitor infected trees and take the appropriate recommended action, which may include felling diseased oaks. Felled material should not be removed from affected sites unless the bark and sapwood have been removed and destroyed.
A4 leaflet | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-802-7
Free
Stock code:FCPN015
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Elspeth Macdonald, Thomas Connolly, Barry A Gardiner, John Moore
2009
Timber production from Scots pine forests in Great Britain is forecast to increase over the next 15 years. This Research Note presents the results of a project to develop and test methods for assessing the quality of Scots pine timber from measurements on trees and logs. Six stands of Scots pine growing in the north of Scotland were studied to evaluate the potential of different non-destructive assessment methods (stem straightness score, various branch indices, and
portable acoustic tools) for predicting log grade out-turn, sawn timber appearance grade and mechanical properties.
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-789-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN005
Practice Note
John Gurnell, Peter Lurz, Robbie McDonald, Harry W Pepper
2009
Practical surveying and monitoring techniques are essential for anyone involved in studying or managing squirrel populations in forests and woodland in Britain. Survey methods can be used to establish the presence of squirrels in a particular area and, if used systematically, can detect significant changes in the distribution or abundance of populations and species over time. Data gathered from surveys can be used to monitor how threatened populations of red squirrels are responding to conservation management or to environmental change, and they can also be used to assess the efficacy of grey squirrel control measures. This Practice Note describes how to plan a survey and gives guidance on which method(s) to use. Five indirect survey techniques are described, which are based on either sightings or signs of squirrels, and advice is given on their suitability for different types of habitat at different times of the year.
A4 leaflet | full colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-792-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN011
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Sarah Green, Duncan Ray
2009
This study identified 288 medium or high drought risk forest sites in eastern Scotland, 125 of which include Sitka spruce as a major component. Sitka spruce is intolerant of drought and is known to have previously experienced drought damage such as tree mortality and stem cracking in eastern Scotland. Cases of direct drought damage, together with infections by the root diseases, H. annosum and Armillaria spp., are likely to increase on Sitka spruce and other species in eastern Scotland as a result of climate change.
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-784-6
Free
Stock code:FCRN004
Technical Note
Shaun Mochan, Thomas Connolly, John Moore
2009
The demands for sustainably produced wood as a raw material for a variety of end uses is placing increased pressure on the forest resource in the UK. Knowledge of the timber properties of trees and logs is important to ensure that harvested wood is directed to its most appropriate end use. Current harvesting practice in the UK means that trees are often felled, processed and dried before the timber is strength graded by machines at the sawmill. This process can be inefficient if timber destined for structural uses is later found to be unsuitable; downgrading may incur significant financial and environmental costs. The use of acoustic technology to predict the mechanical properties of timber is a well-established practice overseas. Recent advances in technology and the development of portable instruments mean that wood can now be assessed in standing trees before they are felled. Trials in the UK have shown that it is possible to relate measurements of acoustic velocity in standing trees and logs to the mechanical properties of timber cut from them. This gives the potential to segregate material for different end uses in the forest, at the roadside or in the sawmill.
A4 | 6 pages | colour
973-0-85538-788-4
Free
Stock code:FCTN018
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
David Edwards
2008
This Research Note summarises the results of a two-year valuation of the current social and economic contribution of forestry, forests and woodlands to the people of Scotland.
A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-772-3
Free
Stock code:FCRN102
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Shaun Mochan, Barry A Gardiner, Steve Lee
2008
The increase in timber volume gained from planting improved Sitka spruce stock has been estimated to be between 21% and 29% at the end of a rotation. This Research Note presents the results of new research designed to investigate the impact of improved Sitka spruce stock on quality characteristics which determine the quantity of green sawlogs in the forest and construction-grade timber in the sawmill. The study was carried out using trees close to rotation age from a trial of improved Sitka spruce at Kershope Forest in Cumbria. A number of characteristics relating to growth rate and timber quality were assessed on the standing trees in the forest and the sawn timber obtained from the trees after felling. The volume of green sawlogs and sawn timber meeting the strength classes C16 and C24 was calculated. Three improved lots with respectively the highest wood density, fastest growth rate and best stem form were compared with a control of unimproved Sitka spruce of Queen Charlotte Island (QCI) origin. The results at both the individual tree and per hectare level showed increased sawn timber volumes from improved planting stock without deterioration in construction grade strength requirements. In the best progeny, increases of up to 130% in both green sawlog volume and sawn timber volumes per hectare were predicted with equivalent mechanical properties to the QCI stock.
A4 leaflet | full colour | 6 pages
978-0-085538-766-2
Free
Stock code:FCRN003
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Duncan Ray
2008
Climate change is now one of the greatest global challenges, and research is under way to establish the likely impacts on many aspects of the environment. Forestry Commission Wales has commissioned Forest Research to determine how forests and forestry in Wales will be affected by climate change. This Research Note provides an initial synopsis of the likely impacts, with preliminary recommendations to support the revision of the Wales Woodland Strategy. Climate change will create challenges and opportunities for the Welsh forest industry. Productivity will increase in some areas and a wider selection of species will become suitable, but effects will vary spatially and by species. New approaches to woodland management will be required to address potential threats of drought, increased pest and disease damage, and wind damage. There are many uncertainties associated with climate change, and the likely impact on trees, management systems and forest operations. A key concept in risk planning and management is diversification: from broadening the choice of genetic material, mixing tree species in stands, to varying management systems and the timing of operations. An aspiration of the current Wales Woodland Strategy is to increase the proportion of woodlands managed using low impact silvicultural systems. This conforms with the need to adapt management through species choice, promote management that has a lower environmental impact on forest sites, and improve the overall resilience of woodland ecosystems to climate change. This Research Note is also available in Welsh.
A4 leaflet | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-764-8
Free
Stock code:FCRN301
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Anna Brown
2008
Red band needle blight is an economically important disease affecting a number of coniferous trees, in particular pines. The disease has a world-wide distribution but until recently it was mainly of concern in the southern hemisphere. In much of the world, including Britain, it is caused by the fungus Dothistroma septosporum. Red band needle blight causes premature needle defoliation which results in the loss of timber yield and, in severe cases, tree mortality. Since the late 1990s the incidence of the disease has increased dramatically in Britain, particularly on Corsican pine (Pinus nigra ssp. laricio), and due to the extent and severity of the disease on this species, there is now a five-year planting moratorium of it on the Forestry Commission estate. More recently there have been reports of the disease causing damage to lodgepole pine in Scotland and it has also been reported on Scots pine – although it rarely appears to be causing significant damage to this species. Reasons for the increase in disease incidence are unclear but could be due to increased rainfall in spring and summer coupled with a trend towards warmer springs, optimising conditions for spore dispersal and infection. Such conditions may become more prevalent in Britain over the next 20 years if current trends in climate change continue. In Britain disease management is currently focused on silvicultural measures to reduce inoculum loads and the use of alternative, less susceptible species in future rotations.
A4 leaflet | 8 pages | colour
978-0-085538-763-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN002
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Suzanne Benham
2008
The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the Forestry Commission’s commitment to this long-term collaborative programme. This Research Note reviews data collected at the Alice Holt site over 14 years of operation from 1992–2006. Evidence of the impacts of climate change, pollution and their interaction with land management are explored. Monitoring of air quality has demonstrated a decline in the levels of some harmful pollutants and this is reflected in a reduction in soil acidity and resulting changes in plant communities. Meteorological data provide evidence that the climate is changing with significant trends in summer rainfall and winter cold days. Changes in moth populations have been linked to changes in climate while the decline in some butterfly species is identified as a possible consequence of reduction in open space. In contrast, this reduction has benefited several species of ground beetle, which prefer shady conditions. Bird surveys have enabled assessment and identification of possible causes of changes to the woodland bird populations, including those species subject to Biodiversity Action Plans. Similar trends are becoming apparent across the network, providing a robust early warning system for detecting changes in natural ecosystems as the effects of climate change set in.
A4 leaflet | 12 pages | full colour
978-0-085538-762-4
Free
Stock code:FCRN001
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Kieron Doick, Tony Hutchings
2007
A4 | 20 pages | 2 colour
978-0-85538-748-8
Free
Stock code:FCIN091
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Jonathan Hughes, Alice Broome
2007
A site recording form (PDF) is available to help with site surveying and monitoring.
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-744-0
Free
Stock code:FCIN090
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Duncan Ray
2008

This Research Note provides an initial synopsis of the likely impacts, with preliminary recommendations to support development of a climate change action plan for forestry in Scotland.

A4 | 8 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-747-1
Free
Stock code:FCRN101
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Amy Eycott
2007
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-738-9
Free
Stock code:FCIN089

Forestry Statistics 2007

Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2007
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK.
It is available online only, from: Forestry Statistics 2007
-
Free
Stock code:FCFS007
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2007
A4 | 4 pages | 2 colour
978-0-85538-741-9
Free
Stock code:FCTN017
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
David Wainhouse, Sara Brough
2007
A4 | 4 pages | colour
978-0-85538-734-1
Free
Stock code:FCIN087
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Elena Vanguelova
2007
A4 | 2 colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-737-2
Free
Stock code:FCIN088
Practice Note
Brenda A Mayle
2007
This edition replaces the previous versions published in 2003 and 2004. It contains updates regarding legislation on the use of warfarin.
A4 leaflet | 16 pages | 4 colour | online only
978-0-85538-735-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN004
Practice Note
David Wainhouse
2007
978-0-85538-730-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN014
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Jason Hubert, Joan Cottrell
2007
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-731-0
Free
Stock code:FCIN086
Technical Note
I Willoughby
2007
A4 | 8 pages | colour
0855389780855387181
Free
Stock code:FCTN016
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
I Willoughby
2007
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-085538-717-4
Free
Stock code:FCIN084
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Kevin Watts
2007
A4 | 8 pages | colour
978-0-85538-728-0
Free
Stock code:FCIN085
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2006
A4 | 12 pages | colour
0855387025
Free
Stock code:FCTN015
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
W L Mason
2006
0855387157
Free
Stock code:FCIN083

Forestry Statistics 2006

Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2006
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK.
Forestry Statistics is now published in a web format only.
Forestry Statistics 2006
0855387165
Free
Stock code:FCFS006
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2006
A4 leaflet
0855387017
Free
Stock code:FCTN014
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2006
A4 leaflet
0855386991
Free
Stock code:FCTN012
Technical Note
Duncan Ireland
2006
A4 leaflet
0855387009
Free
Stock code:FCTN013
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Jason Hubert
2006
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386967
Free
Stock code:FCIN082
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Barry A Gardiner
2006
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386940
Free
Stock code:FCIN081
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Mike Perks
2006

This Information Note summarises the results of a series of experiments, including a synthesis of data from previous Forest Research publications, to provide information regarding recent advances in propagation of hybrid larch using cutting production systems.

A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386932
Free
Stock code:FCIN080
Practice Note
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | colour
085538686X
Free
Stock code:FCPN013
Technical Note
Andy Hall
2005
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386819
Free
Stock code:FCTN009
Technical Note
Ian R Murgatroyd
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386835
Free
Stock code:FCTN011
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Peter Crow
2005
A4 leaflet | colour
0855386797
Free
Stock code:FCIN078
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Jason Hubert
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386789
Free
Stock code:FCIN077
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386851
Free
Stock code:FCIN079

Forestry Statistics 2005

Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2005
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Forestry Statistics 2005 has been produced for the first time as an interactive web publication instead of a priced paper publication and pdf file. Forestry Statistics 2005 .
0855386800
Free
Stock code:FCFS005
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steven J Hendry
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386703
Free
Stock code:FCIN075
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Jenny Bryce
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386770
Free
Stock code:FCIN076
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Sarah Green
2005
A4 leaflet | Full colour
0855386649
Free
Stock code:FCIN072
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Kevin Watts
2005
A4 leaflet | Full colour
0855386657
Free
Stock code:FCIN073
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Andrew Church
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386665
Free
Stock code:FCIN074
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
M J Mcgrady, Steve J Petty
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386630
Free
Stock code:FCIN071
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Shaun Mochan
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour | online only
0855386622
Free
Stock code:FCIN070
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Mark Broadmeadow
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386584
Free
Stock code:FCIN069
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
T R Nisbet
2005
A4 leaflet
0855386541
Free
Stock code:FCIN065
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Anna Brown
2005
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386576
Free
Stock code:FCIN068
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Mike Perks
2005

This report details a series of five experiments which were initiated to investigate the development of multiple leaders following simulated browsing/weevil damage to three size classes of Sitka spruce and Japanese larch immediately after planting.

A4 leaflet
085538655X
Free
Stock code:FCIN066
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Suzanne Martin, Liz O'brien
2005
0855386525
Free
Stock code:FCIN064
Technical Note
Colin J Saunders
2004
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386827
Free
Stock code:FCTN010
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Sophie Hale
2004
0855386479
Free
Stock code:FCIN063
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Joan F Webber, John N Gibbs, Steven J Hendry
2004
This revised edition (2004) replaces the previous edition published in 1998 and 2000.
A4 leaflet | colour | online only
0855386487
Free
Stock code:FCIN006
Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2004
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Traditionally forestry statistics have focused on forests as a source of timber, and on the use of timber by wood processing industries. However, in recent years, it has been increasingly recognised that a wider range of environmental and social aspects of woodland should be reflected in the statistical information that is collected and published. This publication makes some progress in providing more information about environment and recreation, but it is still weighted towards the traditional topics that have the best quality data. A more balanced set of information is provided by the UK Indicators of Sustainable Forestry, which were subject to consultation during 2001-02, before being published in October 2002.
For more information and the results of other statistical surveys visit the Economics and Statistics web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/statistics .
0855386460
Free
Stock code:FCFS004
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steven J Hendry, Roger C Boswell, John C Proudfoot
2004
0855386436
Free
Stock code:FCIN062
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2004
A4 leaflet | 6 Pages | 2 colour
0855386231
Free
Stock code:FCIN057
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Ralph Harmer
2004
A4 leaflet | Full colour
0855386223
Free
Stock code:FCIN056
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2004
A4 leaflet | 6 pages | 2 colour
0855386312
Free
Stock code:FCIN060
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2004
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386193
Free
Stock code:FCIN055
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steve Lee
2004
A4 leaflet | 4 pages | 2 colour
0855386282
Free
Stock code:FCIN058
Technical Note
2004
A4 leaflet | 8 pages | 2 colour
0855386355
Free
Stock code:FCTN008
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Richard N Thompson
2004
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386169
Free
Stock code:FCIN054
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steve Lee
2004
A4 leaflet | 4 pages | 2 colour
0855386304
Free
Stock code:FCIN059
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2004
A4 leaflet | 4 pages | 2 colours
0855386363
Free
Stock code:FCIN061
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2004
This note updates the previous edition published in 1999.
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386207
Free
Stock code:FCIN040
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2003
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386126
Free
Stock code:FCIN052
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2003
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385995
Free
Stock code:FCTN006
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2003
A4 leafet | full colour
0855386037
Free
Stock code:FCIN050
Technical Note
2003
0855386134
Free
Stock code:FCTN007
Technical Note
2003
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385987
Free
Stock code:FCTN005
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2003
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386045
Free
Stock code:FCIN051

Red band needle blight of pine

Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Anna Brown
2003
This publication has been replaced by a new Research Note (FCRN002)
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855386010
Free
Stock code:FCIN049
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2003
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855386142
Free
Stock code:FCIN053
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2003
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385952
Free
Stock code:FCIN048
Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2003
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Traditionally forestry statistics have focused on forests as a source of timber, and on the use of timber by wood processing industries. However, in recent years, it has been increasingly recognised that a wider range of environmental and social aspects of woodland should be reflected in the statistical information that is collected and published. This publication makes some progress in providing more information about environment and recreation, but it is still weighted towards the traditional topics that have the best quality data. A more balanced set of information is provided by the UK Indicators of Sustainable Forestry, which were subject to consultation during 2001-02, before being published in October 2002.
For more information and the results of other statistical surveys visit the Economics and Statistics web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/statistics .
A4 | 58 pages | 2 colour
0855386118
£15.00
Stock code:FCFS003
Technical Paper
Graham D Pyatt
2003
'Applying the Ecological Site Classification in the lowlands' is an illustrated case study of the New Forest Inclosures, which cover an area of 8500 hectares in southern Britain.
The Ecological Site Classification (ESC) model is a PC-based decision support system for forest managers. It is designed to match key site factors with the ecological requirements of different tree species and woodland communities (as defined in the National Vegetation Classification) anywhere in Britain. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white + colour section
0855385685
£10.00
Stock code:FCTP033
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Bruce Walker
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538557X
Free
Stock code:FCIN042
Technical Note
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385634
Free
Stock code:FCTN001
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Una Lee
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385618
Free
Stock code:FCIN043
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385758
Free
Stock code:FCIN046
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
, Bianca Ambrose-Oji
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385766
Free
Stock code:FCIN047
Technical Note
2002
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385715
Free
Stock code:FCTN003
Technical Note
2002
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385723
Free
Stock code:FCTN004
Practice Note
Peter Gosling
2002
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385642
Free
Stock code:FCPN012
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Tony Hutchings
2002
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385626
Free
Stock code:FCIN044
Technical Note
Bill J Jones
2002
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385707
Free
Stock code:FCTN002
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2002
The blank monitoring form included in this publication may be downloaded as a single page here:(PDF)
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385669
Free
Stock code:FCIN045
Practice Note
Alan Armstrong
2002
Please note that this revised edition replaces the previous version published in August 1999.
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385677
Free
Stock code:FCPN007
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
David Lonsdale
2002
This revised edition (September 2002) replaces the previous 2 editions published in 1998 and 2001.
See also interim information on tree death in poplar plantations published in November 2005:
Tree death in poplar plantations
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385693
Free
Stock code:FCIN007
Forestry Statistics
2002
This document contains a set of UK indicators of sustainable foresty. The indicators mostly provide information about the present state, and trends over time, of woodlands and their management, rather than measures of driving forces (pressures) or responses.
A4 | 104 pages | 2 colour | online only
0755910257
£10.00
Stock code:FCMS014
Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2002
Forestry Statistics is a new compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Traditionally forestry statistics have focused on forests as a source of timber and on the use of timber by wood processing industries. However, it has been increasingly recognised that a wider range of environmental and social aspects of forests and woodlands should be reflected in the statistical information that is collected and published. This publication makes some progress in providing more information, but it is still weighted towards the traditional topics that have the best quality data. A more balanced set of information will be provided by the UK Indicators of Sustainable Forestry.
For more information and the results of other statistical surveys visit the Economics and Statistics web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/statistics.
A4 | 48 pages | 2 colour
0855385588
Free
Stock code:FCFS001
Forestry Statistics
Forestry Commission
2002
Forestry Statistics is a compendium of statistical information about woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Traditionally forestry statistics have focused on forests as a source of timber, and on the use of timber by wood processing industries. However, in recent years, it has been increasingly recognised that a wider range of environmental and social aspects of woodland should be reflected in the statistical information that is collected and published. This publication makes some progress in providing more information about environment and recreation, but it is still weighted towards the traditional topics that have the best quality data. A more balanced set of information is provided by the UK Indicators of Sustainable Forestry, which were subject to consultation during 2001-02, before being published in October 2002.
For more information and the results of other statistical surveys visit the Economics and Statistics web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/statistics .
A4 | 54 pages | 2 colour
0855385774
£15.00
Stock code:FCFS002
Technical Paper
Russell Anderson
2001
Afforestation affects bogs by triggering physical, chemical and biological changes within the environment. The primary purpose of bog restoration is to re-create wildlife habitat. This Technical Paper addresses the case for restoration, the basic principles that should be considered, the special case of cracked peat, and results from and practical experience gained in past restoration projects. Forestry Commission guidelines and the costs of restoration are indicated in appendices. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white
0855384174
£7.50
Stock code:FCTP032
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2001
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385448
Free
Stock code:FCIN041
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Roger Moore
2001
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385316
Free
Stock code:FCIN038
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Elspeth Macdonald
2001
A4 leaflet | 2 colour | online only
0855385340
Free
Stock code:FCIN039
Technical Paper
Richard Ennos, Rick Worrell, Paul Arkle, Douglas Malcolm
2000
This Technical paper provides an account of genetic variation in forest tree species. It reviews our understanding of the genetic variation of native tree and shrub species in Britain. Highlights the issues that need to be addressed in developing a genetic conservation policy for British forestry. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 38 pages | black & white
0855384123
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP031
Technical Paper
Duncan Perry, John Handley
2000
This report considers the use of woodlands as a means of rehabilitating urban and industrial wastelands, and the availability of such land as a resource for new woodlands in England and Wales. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 64 pages | black & white
0855384093
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP029
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2000
A4 leaflet | colour
0855385235
Free
Stock code:FCIN033
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2000
A4 leaflet | colour
0855385219
Free
Stock code:FCIN031
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2000
A4 leaflet | colour
0855385294
Free
Stock code:FCIN037
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
R M A Gill
2000

This information Note provides recommendations for establishing effective deer management and tree protection measures

A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385278
Free
Stock code:FCIN036
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
2000
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385251
Free
Stock code:FCIN034
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Richard Ferris
2000
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385227
Free
Stock code:FCIN032

Nant-yr-Hwch long-term forest design plan: an example of good practice from the private sector

Practice Note
S Bell
2000
[Due to the large size of this document, a pdf file is not available]
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385154
Free
Stock code:FCPN010
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Ralph Harmer
2000

Information and advice is provided within this note on the effects of deer browsing within different broadleaved woodlands.

A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538526X
Free
Stock code:FCIN035
Technical Paper
Ian Willoughby, David Clay
1999
This Technical Paper updates information in Forestry Commission Field Book 8 The use of herbicides in the forest. It provides a summary of recent Forestry Commission research findings concerning the use of herbicides in forestry, and also explains relevant changes in legislation and approved products.

Key herbicides cited in this publication:
atrazine, cyanazine, cycloxydim, clopyralid, dichlobenil, diflufenican, glufosinateammonium, glyphosate, lenacil, metamitron, metazachlor, napropamide, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, propyzamide, simazine.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 50 pages | black & white + colour section | online only
0855384077
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP028
Technical Paper
Neil A. Mackenzie
1999
This Technical Paper summarises the present extent of native woodland in Scotland, which is a substantially greater resource than has previously been recognised, reviews the planting and natural regeneration of native woodlands over the past 5 years, and considers the value of existing survey information in relation to the preparation of the UK Habitat Action Plans. This Paper draws together and reviews information in FC Technical Papers 12 and 17. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 30 pages | black & white
0855384107
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP030
Technical Paper
Gary Kerr, Hugh V. Williams
1999
A practical guide explaining how to create new woodlands in the National Forest. Advice is based on general principles of tree establishment techniques, latest research findings and, importantly, the experience of establishing three large Demonstration Woodlands in the National Forest. A site visit to at least one of them will bring to life the points made in this guide. The five main chapters plus supporting information will be applicable to managers wherever new community woodlands are envisaged. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 30 pages | black & white + colour section
0855384069
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP027
Technical Paper
Jonathan Humphrey, Kate Holl, Alice Broome
1998
This Technical Paper brings together a series of papers presented at the symposium 'Birch in spruce plantations: management for biodiversity' held at Scottish Natural Heritage's Battleby Conference Centre, Perth, in February 1997. The aim of this symposium was to present the findings from a series of collaborative research projects funded jointly by the Forestry Commission and Scottish Natural Heritage, looking into aspects of biodiversity associated with birch in spruce plantations. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 70 pages | black & white
0855383569
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP026
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Prof. Clive Brasier
1999
A4 leaflet | colour
085538509X
Free
Stock code:FCIN030
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383860
Free
Stock code:FCIN015
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | colour
0855383941
Free
Stock code:FCIN022
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour | online only
0855385057
Free
Stock code:FCPN009
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | colour
0855383879
Free
Stock code:FCIN016
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383992
Free
Stock code:FCIN027
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour | online only
0855383968
Free
Stock code:FCIN024
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
J E Pratt
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383909
Free
Stock code:FCIN018
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | colour
0855385081
Free
Stock code:FCIN029
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383917
Free
Stock code:FCIN019
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538395X
Free
Stock code:FCIN023
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Steve Lee
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383984
Free
Stock code:FCIN026
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Helen M Mckay
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383925
Free
Stock code:FCIN020
Practice Note
Roger Herbert
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385030
Free
Stock code:FCPN008
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383976
Free
Stock code:FCIN025
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999

This Note describes the influence of domestic stock on woodland habitats and their associated flora and fauna and provides guidance on the use of domestic stock to re-create, maintain and enhance the characteristics of semi-natural woodlands.

A4 leaflet | colour
0855385049
Free
Stock code:FCIN028
Practice Note
Brenda A Mayle
1999

This Note provides information on: identifying whether there are deer present and of which species; deciding whether deer are causing damage; the ways in which deer problems can be prevented and knowing where to go for more advice.

A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385014
Free
Stock code:FCPN006

Poplar and willow varieties for short rotation coppice

Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Paul Tabbush
1999
This information note has been withdrawn due to disease problems with some varieties.

Interim information is available to download here as a pdf file:
Tree death in poplar plantations
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383887
Free
Stock code:FCIN017

Approved poplar varieties

Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1999
This Information Note has been withdrawn due to disease problems with some varieties.

Interim information is available to download here as a pdf file:
Tree death in poplar plantations
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383933
Free
Stock code:FCIN021
Technical Paper
Jonathan Humphrey, Robin Gill, Jenny Claridge
1998
Nine papers presented at a workshop funded as part of an EU concerted action programme, aimed at reviewing information on the impact of grazing animals on forest ecosystems, identifying management problems, and determining priority areas for research. There is need for better integration of ecological and economic objectives in forest ecosystems; large herbivores can be used in management to facilitate this integration. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 90 pages | black & white
0855383550
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP025
Technical Paper
Keith R. Day, Gudmundur Halldorsson, Susanne Harding, Nigel A. Straw
1998
The development and regulation of green spruce aphid pest problems in Europe were the subject of a European Community Concerted Action funded in part by the EC Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry and Agro-Industry Specific Programme as project AIR3- CT94-1883. This Technical Paper is the product of a collaboration between forest research institutes in the four European states that participated in the Concerted Action and a number of other contributors whose work is highly relevant to the project. The Paper provides a comprehensive summary of current knowledge of the green spruce aphid as a pest of spruce and suggests what additional information is required to implement a pest management programme. This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 105 pages | black & white | online only
0855383542
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP024
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Colin Edwards
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383828
Free
Stock code:FCIN011
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
S Bell
1998
A4 leaflet | colour
0855383844
Free
Stock code:FCIN013
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Douglas S Wright
1998
A4 leaflet | colour | online only
0855383771
Free
Stock code:FCIN008
Practice Note
Gordon S Patterson
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383801
Free
Stock code:FCPN005
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383836
Free
Stock code:FCIN012
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Janet Methley
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538381X
Free
Stock code:FCIN010
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383739
Free
Stock code:FCPN003
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour | online only
0855383674
Free
Stock code:FCIN003
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383720
Free
Stock code:FCPN002
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Nigel A Straw
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383747
Free
Stock code:FCIN005
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Helen M Mckay
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383852
Free
Stock code:FCIN014
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1998
A4 leaflet | colour
0855383690
Free
Stock code:FCIN004
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Forestry Commission
1998
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538378X
Free
Stock code:FCIN009
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998

This Practice Note discusses in detail the nearet neighbour method and its use as a decision making tool for wildlife management.

A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383712
Free
Stock code:FCPN001
Technical Paper
Andy J. Moffat
1997
Eight papers from a conference on restoring disturbed land to forestry, relevant because of the rapid increase in this type of land use in support of urban forestry initiatives. The papers represent a valuable set of opinions, and a basis from which further work in promoting woodland cover on restored disturbed land can be developed. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 26 pages | black & white
0855383445
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP022
Technical Paper
Andrew H. Chadwick, Simon J. Hodge, Philip R. Ratcliffe
1997
The red fox is a generalist predator and scavenger, adapted to a range of habitats. An account of fox biology in relation to forestry is given, information on fox population trends is reviewed, and recommendations made with regard to strategies for management of the economic impact of foxes. This information is of value to forest managers and other land managers. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 48 pages | black & white
085538350X
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP023
Technical Paper
Graham D Pyatt, Juan C. Suarez
1997
Describes a site classification that provides a sound ecological basis for the sustainable management of forests and resulting timber production, wildlife conservation and other benefits. Applicable to all kinds of woodlands, it incorporates the existing classification of soil types used for many years when selecting silvicultural options. Much of this publication is specific to Grampian Region (see Research Information Note 260 for a general outline of the classification). A publication on the subject, that will be applicable country-wide, is in preparation. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 96 pages | black & white + colour section
085538347X
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP020
Technical Paper
Harriet Palmer, Barry Gardiner, Max Hislop, Alan Sibbald, Alan Duncan
1997
Proceedings from a highly topical seminar, the main objectives of which were: to review current research and development on the use of trees for shelter; to increase the awareness of shelter-related work being undertaken in the UK; to identify priority areas for future research and potential collaborative links. Papers were presented on trees for shelter in relation to energy conservation, pollution reduction, animal production, wildlife and farm economics. This publications is still available in hardcopy.
A4 | 76 pages | black & white
0855383488
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP021
Technical Paper
Adrian Whiteman
1996
Presents models of wood supply and wood product demand for the UK to 2050. The forecasts show that it is likely that wood supply will increase with demand up to 2025. After that, if no new planting is undertaken, supply will fall while demand will continue to rise (although in this respect there is a wide margin of uncertainty). A continuous level of supply would be desirable for the development of the domestic wood-processing industry. The level of new planting required to achieve this is discussed. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 20 pages | black & white
0855383461
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP019

Forestry practice publications

Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
1997
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383615
Free
Stock code:FCIN001
Research Note (incl. Information Notes)
Colin Mcevoy
1997
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
085538364X
Free
Stock code:FCIN002
Technical Paper
Terence R. Lee
1996
In order to gain a clearer understanding of the value of forests for visitor recreation the Forestry Commission funded a research project to evaluate public perceptions, attitudes and preferences in forests and woodlands. This Technical Paper presents the background to the project, and the results and analyses of the research. It will provide a comprehensive reference on the subject of forest visitor preferences for many years to come. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 166 pages | black + white
0-85538-345-3
£15.00
Stock code:FCTP018
Technical Paper
Neil A. MacKenzie, Robin F. Callander
1996
This report provides a summary account of the present extent, distribution, composition and condition of the native woodlands in the Scottish Lowlands. There are approx 29,000 ha of which over half is of natural origin and commonly of birch and oak. In the planted areas, oak, ash and elm predominate. The percentage of native species in the Lowlands has declined progressively since the Second World War, but there is a recent trend of increased new planting. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 30 pages | black & white
0-85538-342-9
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP017
Technical Paper
Richard Worrell
1996
This Technical paper draws together information on the forests of the Scottish Highlands, many of which are regarded as being extreme oceanic variants of the boreal forest. Composition, structure, dynamics and history are described and the future of Scottish boreal forests is assessed. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 42 pages | black & white
0-85538-334-8
£4.00
Stock code:FCTP014
Technical Paper
Philip Ratcliffe, Jenny Claridge
1996
This Technical Paper includes papers from the Thetfore symposium of 1991. The symposium was designed to gather together the results of a wide range of research which collectively have added greatly to our understanding of this pine forest ecosystem and influenced its management. The intended audience is woodland managers and ecologists and anyone with an interest in forest wildlife including the many visitors to the Forest Park. As well as providing a wealth of information about Thetford Forest, the abundance of comparative information included should also be of value to those interested in other woodland types. This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 178 pages | black & white | online only
0-85538-337-2
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP013
Technical Paper
Roger Lines
1996
The range of lodgepole pine extends over 26 million hectares of north-west America, where climates vary from the bitter cold Yukon to the very mild Californian coast. It occurs from sea level to 3900 min elevation. Over millions of years it evolved into a species which shows more variability than any other conifer. Practical forest research aims to discover the most suitable origins for use on the wide variety of sites which occur in Britain. This Technical Paper discusses in detail the results of the seed origin experiments which began in 1928 and ran for 45 years. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 141 pages | colour cover
0-85538-336-4
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP010
Technical Paper
Barry Gardiner, Giles Stacey
1996
Forest edges are important for the stability, visual impact and biodiversity of forests. Improved design of edge plantings will enhance the benefits they provide. Wind tunnel experiments are described and results indicate the effect of different edge treatments on stability. Practical methods for creating edges that can improve forest stability and visual appeal are discussed. This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 8 pages | black & white | online only
0-85538-339-9
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP016
Technical Paper
J.E. Pratt
1996
The use of borates for the control of Fomes root and butt rot of conifers is reviewed in relation to the history of their use in wood preservatives, their efficacy as stump treatment materials, and their effect on the environment. Effectiveness, phytotoxicity, vertebrate toxicity, and environmental impact are all considered. Borates are effective in controlling infection of stumps by Heterobasidion annosum and pose little risk to the environment.
Forest edges are important for the stability, visual impact and biodiversity of forests. Improved design of edge plantings will enhance the benefits they provide. Wind tunnel experiments are described and results indicate the effect of different edge treatments on stability. Practical methods for creating edges that can improve forest stability and visual appeal are discussed.

This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 20 pages | black & white
0-85538-338-0
£4.00
Stock code:FCTP015
Technical Paper
Neil A. Mackenzie, Robin F. Callander
1995
Provides a summary account of the present extent, distribution, composition and condition of the native woodlands of the Highlands, which at over 210,000 ha is substantially greater than had previously been recognised. Half is of natural origin and half is of planted origin native woodland. Birch, Scots pine and oak are the commonest native species. There has been a recent increase in the natural regeneration and planting of native species. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 28 pages | black & white
0-85538-333-X
£4.00
Stock code:FCTP012
Technical Paper
Gary Kerr
1995
The correct use of treeshelters is important to ensure successful and rapid early establishment of young trees. Almost 200 sites were surveyed with the object of comparing actual usage of treeshelters with the recommendations (see FC Handbook 7). Effective weed control is essential with use of treeshelters. Height of treeshelters must take into account the size of mammal likely to browse in the locality. A strong stake is required. Varied planting patterns improve visual amenity. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.

A4 | 10 pages | black & white
0-85538-330-5
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP011
Technical Paper
M.P. Coutts
1995
This Technical Paper describes a collaborative effort to explain the reduced growth at time of canopy closure or later of Sitka spruce on parts of the South Wales coalfield. Stem analysis showed that growth had declined steeply over a period of about four years. Decline was associated with thin crowns and with bending of the tops of some of the trees. This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 121 pages | colour cover | online only
0-85538-332-1
£6.00
Stock code:FCTP009
Technical Paper
Richard Ferris-Kaan
1995
Managing Forests for Biodiversity was the title of a one-day symposium, organised by the British Ecological Society's Forest Ecology Group, and held at the Maybury Hotel, Edinburgh on 2 September 1992. This Technical Paper is a record of papers presented at the symposium plus additional information, preceded by a brief introductory review. The symposium was seen as a first step towards examining the very complex issues of biodiversity and forest management. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 51 pages | colour cover
0-85538-324-0
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP008
Technical Paper
Alan F. Mitchell, Victoria E. Schilling, John E.J. White
1995
Measurements of exceptional trees have been recorded for a considerable number of years: initially out of curiosity, especially about maximum size, and then to investigate the potential for growth and productivity according to species and situation. The Forestry Commission tree register provided all the measurements for early editions of this title. The register was begun in 1952 as a survey to locate trees of outstanding size, vigour and quality for use as prospective material for plantation tree breeding experiments. Very large ancient, ornamental and obscure specimens were added to the register after 1954. Historical information, particularly from the beginning of the 20th century, was subsequently researched and extant trees were located and remeasured. This work continues today, supplemented increasingly since 1985 with routine tree measurements recorded by The Tree Register of the British Isles which is a charitable trust. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 88 pages | colour cover
0-85538-322-4
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP007
Technical Paper
J.M. Christie
1994
Poplars are noted for their extremely rapid rates of growth. The development of new canker-and rust-resistant clones in Belgium and their introduction into Britain make them a very attractive crop to grow on suitable sites, such as former agricultural land. New tables are needed to reflect the more rapid rates of growth seen at spacings which are current practice. In this Technical Paper we give tables for spacings of 8 m x 8 m, 4 m x 4 m and 3 m x 3 m. The range of yield classes is extended to Yield Class 26. These tables only represent three out of a wide range of planting spacings for which models could be constructed. The systematic thinning treatments proposed in the models for 3 m and 4 m planting spacing were chosen on the assumption that an early return from a thinning treatment, that could be simply applied, would be a preferred management option. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 35 pages | colour cover
0-85538-321-6
£4.50
Stock code:FCTP006
Technical Paper
C.P. Mitchell, R.J. Cooper, J. Ball, B. Gunneberg, J.J. Swift
1994
In 1990, the future of the Private Woodlands Survey was reconsidered by the Forestry Commission. Its original purpose had been to inform interested parties on reviews of planting grants. In recent years, however, a change in the economic rationale underlying grant-aid to private woodland owners has been increasingly recognised. This means that the primary basis for determining the levels of grants is an assessment of the consequent public benefits, rather than of the cost incurred by the owner. At the same time, it was considered that information on forestry costs could be obtained more cost-effectively through periodic consultations with practitioners in the industry, without having to carry out a full-scale survey. Accordingly, in 1991, the Forestry Commission decided to wind down the survey and publish the results of the final three years' work in the form of this Technical Paper. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 49 pages | colour cover
0
£5.00
Stock code:FCTP005
Technical Paper
George Matthews
1993
Calculations of the quantities of carbon stored by trees requires a knowledge, not only of their growth rates, but also of the proportions of carbon contributing to their chemical make-up. This Technical Paper presents the results of a search of the literature for reported values for carbon contents and results of estimations of carbon contents from reported analyses for cellulose and other constituents by solvent extraction, and data from destructive distillation experiments.

It is concluded that the commonly assumed value of 50% for the carbon content of dry wood is satisfactory for most purposes, but appropriate allowances should be made for any water present.

This publication is no longer available in hardcopy.
A4 | 21 pages | colour cover | online only
0
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP004
Technical Paper
David Williamson, Bill Mason, John Morgan, David Clay
1993
Information is given on the use of forest nursery herbicides. Much of this information is based on the results of Forestry Commission experiments. A brief description of the types of herbicides is given followed by information on the various herbicides which can be used at the different stages of forest nursery stock production. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 11 pages | colour cover
0
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP003
Technical Paper
John Cayford
1993
The black grouse is a large, sexually dimorphic species found typically in habitats transitional between moorland and forest. Numbers of black grouse have recently declined throughout much of Europe. In Britain, the species is now largely confined to Scotland, the north of England and Wales. Continued loss and fragmentation of habitat represents the most serious threat to black grouse. Research suggests that black grouse would be favoured by sympathetic management practices which conserve existing habitat in forests and on adjacent moorland. Black grouse use forestry plantations prior to canopy closure, resulting in local, short-term increases in numbers and range. This Technical Paper gives recommendations for the management of black grouse in coniferous forests together with a description of the species, its current distribution, status and critical habitat requirements. This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 12 pages | colour cover
0
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP001
Technical Paper
Helen McKay
1993
Electrolyte leakage from fine roots was measured before and after 30 and 90 days cold storage. The effect of the entry date and the length of cold storage were examined during the exceptionally mild winter of 1989-90 and the more typical winter of 1990-91. In the first year, roots from 2-year-old transplants and undercuts of Sitka spruce (Queen Charlotte Islands), Douglas fir (Darrington, Washington) and Japanese larch (unknown origin) grown at Wykeham Nursery were stored at +1°C on 13 occasions between October and April. In the following year, undercuts of Sitka spruce from Alaska, Queen Charlotte Islands and Oregon, Douglas fir (Darrington), Japanese larch (unknown origin) and Scots pine (South England provenance) were stored on nine occasions between mid-November and April.

In 1989-90, the species' tolerance to cold storage increased in the order Douglas fir < Japanese larch < Sitka spruce (Queen Charlotte Islands). This order was evident in 1990-91 too. Within Sitka spruce, the more northerly the seed origin the greater its tolerance to cold storage. Scots pine was only slightly more tolerant of cold storage than Sitka spruce of Oregon origin. Undercutting and regular wrenching had a minor effect on the ability of Japanese larch to withstand cold storage but did not have a consistent, significant effect on the tolerance of Sitka spruce or Douglas fir.

Plants were more tolerant of storage in the colder winter of 1990-91 than in the preceding milder winter. On the basis of the leakage patterns found in the two contrasting years, safe lifting dates are given for Sitka spruce (Queen Charlotte Island) and Japanese larch. Safe lifting dates for Douglas fir, Scots pine, Oregon Sitka spruce and Alaskan Sitka spruce are suggested; further research is needed to verify these dates.

This publication is still available to order in hardcopy.
A4 | 9 pages | colour cover
0
£3.00
Stock code:FCTP002
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2017
This Plant Health Guide sets out the requirements for landing controlled material from non-EU countries into Great Britain. It lists controlled genera and species and highlights the import regulations that apply to the landing of wood, wood products and bark from these species from countries outside of the EU. This 3rd edition reflects recent changes to legislation.
A4 | 24 pages | colour | 3rd edition
978-085538-962-8
Free
Stock code:FCPH001
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2017
Pine pitch canker, also known as pitch or pitch pine canker, is a serious canker disease of pines and Douglas fir caused by the fungus Fusarium circinatum. The disease affects trees in planted forests, nurseries, parks and gardens. In plantations, the disease leads to reduced growth and cone yield and can kill trees. It will also kill tree seedlings in nurseries. Pine pitch canker can have wider impacts in the landscape affecting recreational uses, tourism, and the aesthetic appearance of trees in parks and gardens. The fungus is thought to be native to Central America, but is highly damaging to some pine species elsewhere in the world, including parts of Europe, and further spread is likely. It is not present in Britain but there is a risk it could establish in the southeast if introduced.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-960-4
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PPC
Field Guide
Forestry Commission
2015
This Field Guide provides guidance on the control of volume to be removed when marking a thinning and a guide to thinning yields. There are four sections: the first describes the yield class system and how yield class is assessed in a stand. The second covers thinning practice, including the type, intensity and cycle of thinning, how to calculate the thinning yield, the timing of thinning, and how the thinning is controlled. The third describes the field procedures for estimating top height, basal area and volume marked, and how to calculate mean diameter. The final section presents general yield class curves for a selection of common species. A summary of the office and field procedures to be followed when marking a thinning is printed on the inside front cover.
A5 | colour | 56 pages
978-0-85538-930-7
£14.00
Stock code:FCFG004

Forest Seedlings: A guide to the identification of tree and shrub seedlings in Britain

Field Guide
Richard Jinks, Matt Parratt
2014
The ability to accurately identify tree and shrub seedlings is invaluable to anyone with an interest in forests and woodlands and it is fundamental to practical woodland management. However, identifying seedlings in their first year of growth is not as straightforward as identifying adult trees and shrubs, as they are often strikingly different in appearance.

Forest Seedlings is a new digital field guide to identifying tree and shrub seedlings in the British Isles. The guide has been developed by experts working for the Forestry Commission in Great Britain and covers nearly 100 species commonly found in British forests and woodlands.

The guide contains stunning high-resolution images of leaves and other seedling features that can be used for identification. Species can be searched for and listed by their common and scientific names and dynamic filtering allows users to identify seedlings based upon a number of key characteristics. The ‘Field notes’ tool provides an easy way to add notes and automatically record the locations of specimens using the device GPS, which does not require a mobile phone signal.



App
0
£1.49
Stock code:FCAPP001
National Forest Inventory
Forestry Commission
2014
This Inventory Report is one of a series of publications reporting the outputs of the Forestry Commission National Forest Inventory. It forms part of the 25-year forecast of softwood availability series, which includes the following reports:
• Standing timber volume for coniferous trees in Britain
• 25-year forecast of softwood timber availability
• 25-year forecast of standing coniferous volume and increment
• 25-year forecast of coniferous carbon stocks
• 25-year forecast of coniferous biomass stocks
A4 | 14 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-907-9
Free
Stock code:FCNFI113
National Forest Inventory
Forestry Commission
2014
This Inventory Report is one of a series of publications reporting the outputs of the Forestry Commission National Forest Inventory. It forms part of the 25-year forecast of softwood availability series, which includes the following reports:
• Standing timber volume for coniferous trees in Britain
• 25-year forecast of softwood timber availability
• 25-year forecast of standing coniferous volume and increment
• 25-year forecast of coniferous carbon stocks
• 25-year forecast of coniferous biomass stocks
A4 | 14 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-908-6
Free
Stock code:FCNFI114
National Forest Inventory
Forestry Commission
2012
This Inventory Report is one of a series of publications reporting the outputs of the Forestry Commission National Forest Inventory. It forms part of the 25-year forecast of softwood availability series, which includes the following reports:
• Standing timber volume for coniferous trees in Britain
• 25-year forecast of softwood timber availability
• 25-year forecast of standing coniferous volume and increment
• 25-year forecast of coniferous carbon stocks
• 25-year forecast of coniferous biomass stocks
A4 | 20 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-866-9
Free
Stock code:FCNFI112
National Forest Inventory
Forestry Commission
2012
This Inventory Report is one of a series of publications reporting the outputs of the Forestry Commission National Forest Inventory. It forms part of the 25-year forecast of softwood availability series, which includes the following reports:
• Standing timber volume for coniferous trees in Britain
• 25-year forecast of softwood timber availability
• 25-year forecast of standing coniferous volume and increment
• 25-year forecast of coniferous carbon stocks
• 25-year forecast of coniferous biomass stocks
A4 | 20 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-862-1
Free
Stock code:FCNFI111
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2009
A4 | 22 pages | 2 colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCFC005

Timber Measurement

Field Guide
Ewan D Mackie, Robert W Matthews
2008
Timber measurement was first published in 1983 as Booklet 49. Its punchy, practical style proved popular with practitioners trying to work out how to take basic measurements on trees and timber and apply standard forest mensuration procedures in the field. This revised edition has been produced primarily to achieve consistency with the second edition of Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners. The new edition includes a number of significant changes, including a revised section on weight measurement. The section on abbreviated tariffing has been amended for consistency with Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners. The opportunity has also been taken to make small refinements to the information in all sections to improve clarity and, in a departure from the original format, a number of decision trees have been included to help guide users through the various methods and procedures.
A5 spiral bound | 66 pages | 2 colour
978-0-085538-749-5
£16.00
Stock code:FCFG002
National Forest Inventory
Forestry Commission
2008
This publication covers the management and biodiversity data collected during the first National
Inventory of Woodland and Trees (NIWT1) that were not published with the main statistics on
woodland area. Many of these data were collected for the first time during this National Inventory
project.
A4 | 50 pages | colour
978-0-085538
Free
Stock code:FCIR002
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2007
This booklet tells you what you need to know about getting permission to fell any trees for yourself or for someone else. It is for guidance only and is not a legally binding interpretation of the legislation (the Forestry Act 1967 as amended). If you are unsure as to whether you require a licence, speak to your nearest Forestry Commission office for guidance before you start any tree felling.
A4 | 8 pages | 2 colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCFC004

Roundwood and sawlog volume tables

Field Guide
Forestry Commission
2007
This publication combines and replaces Forestry Commission Field Book 1: Top diameter sawlog tables and Forestry Commission Field Book 11: Mid diameter volume tables. The top diameter method for assessing volume is restricted to groups of sawlogs, preferably of uniform length up to 8.4 m. Volume determination using the mid diameter method is traditionally used for assessing timber lengths such as sawlogs, selected poles and billets. Further information on the choice of volume assessment method can be found in Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners where these tables are reproduced.
A5 spiral bound | 50 pages | 2 colour
978-0-85538-723-5
£10
Stock code:FCFG003
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2004
This booklet provides guidance on how to seek consent from the Forestry Commission for 'relevant projects' under the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations 1999. The relevant projects are deforestation, afforestation, forestry roads and forestry quarries.

For more information, visit our page on Environmental Impact Assessment

A4 booklet | 12 pages
0
Free
Stock code:FCCS053
National Forest Inventory
2003
This Report presents the results for Great Britain from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees.
For more information and the results of the survey at country, region and county level (as appropriate), visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855386029
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR000

The identification of soils for forest management

Field Guide
Fiona Kennedy
2002
The aim of this Field Guide is to assist forestry practitioners in making responsible management decisions by providing them with a means of rapid soil identification. This is done via a series of keys aimed at those with little or no experience of soil classification.
A5 spiral field guide | 56 pages | full colour
0855385596
£17.00
Stock code:FCFG001
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the results for Scotland from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees.
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385405
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR100
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for London from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 50 pages | full colour | online only
0855385510
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR207
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for South West from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385499
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR205
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for South East from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385529
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR208
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for North West from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour | online only
0855385537
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR209
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for North East from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour | online only
0855385456
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR201
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for East of England from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385502
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR206
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for West Midlands from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour | online only
0855385472
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR203
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for East Midlands from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour | online only
0855385480
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR204
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the regional results for Yorkshire and the Humber from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: England.
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385464
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR202
National Forest Inventory
2002
This Report presents the results for Wales from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees.
This Report is also available in Welsh:Download here (PDF)
For more information and the results of the survey at county level, visit the National Inventory web pages at www.forestry.gov.uk/inventory
A4 | 118 pages | full colour
0855385421
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR300
UKFS Guideline Note
S Bell
2001
A4 leaflet | full colour | online only
0855385367
Free
Stock code:FCGN002
National Forest Inventory
2001
This Report presents the regional results for the Highlands from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour
0855385324
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR109
National Forest Inventory
2001
This Report presents the regional results for the Western Isles from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour
0855385332
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR110
National Forest Inventory
2001
This Report presents the results for England from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees.
The Report includes a full-colour foldout wallchart showing woodland distribution for England.
A4 | 58 pages | full colour
0855385413
£15.00
Stock code:FCIR200
UKFS Guideline Note
Gordon S Patterson
2000
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385286
Free
Stock code:FCGN001
National Forest Inventory
2000
This Report presents the regional results for Fife from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385189
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR108
National Forest Inventory
2000
This Report presents the regional results for Tayside from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385170
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR107
National Forest Inventory
2000
This Report presents the regional results for Central from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385162
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR106
Field Book
Brenda A. Mayle, Andrew J. Peace, Robin M.A. Gill
1999
Section 1 of this Field Guide considers the need to manage deer. Section 2 gives guidance on choosing a suitable census and sampling method. Section 3 presents 21 methods of population estimation, with a worked example provided in most cases. Methods of greatest use to practising deer managers (in terms of time and cost-effectiveness) are described in more detail. Section 4 reinforces the advantages of using census data in the development of effective deer management strategies. Section 5 comprises eleven appendices of useful supporting information. Deer populations in Britain are increasing; this book is a timely and practical guide for woodland managers and wildlife rangers. This publication is still available in hard copy.
135 x 235mm | 96 pages | colour images
0-85538-405-0
£14.00
Stock code:FCFB018
National Forest Inventory
1999
This Report presents the regional results for Lothian from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385006
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR103
National Forest Inventory
1999
This Report presents the regional results for the Borders from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855383895
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR102
National Forest Inventory
1999
This Report presents the regional results for Strathclyde from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385073
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR104
National Forest Inventory
1999
This Report presents the regional results for Dumfries and Galloway from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855385065
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR105
Bulletin
Steve J. Petty
1998
The main aim of this Bulletin is to inform forest managers about the ecology of birds of prey in these new conifer forests and to offer practical advice on management techniques that will improve their attractiveness for this important group of birds. While the information and advice given concentrates on and relates to man-made forests in the uplands, many of the principles discussed are also relevant to raptors in other upland habitats, and in the lowlands. Many aspects will be of interest to the more general reader. This publication is available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 60 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710344-6
£14.99
Stock code:FCBU118
Field Book
S.C. Gregory, D.B. Redfern
1998
Part I provides some useful guidelines by which managers and owners can investigate health problems in their trees through straightforward field observations. Part II is a key to the major problems of plantation trees. Part III describes the main features of some of the more common and most important diseases and disorders of forest trees in British woodlands. This publication is still available in hard copy.
135 x 235mm | 135 pages | colour images
0-11-710338-1
£25.00
Stock code:FCFB016
Field Book
Clive Carter, Tim Winter
1998
When conifers have been grown for Christmas trees in lowland arable farmland areas under an intensive short-rotation system, it has sometimes been found difficult to produce good quality foliage without embarking on some kind of insect control. Thirty-one species of aphids, moths, sawflies, beetles and mites are of concern to growers of Christmas trees in Europe. Many illustrations of pests, their life cycle, and the damage they cause support concise descriptions in the text. Advice on minimising damage and controlling insect populations is given. This publication is still available in hard copy.
135 x 235mm | 90 pages | colour images
0-11-710339-X
£17.99
Stock code:FCFB017
Field Book
Ian Willoughby, Colin Palmer
1997
Good weed control is essential for quality Christmas tree production. Herbicides are usually the most cost-effective way of achieving this. Two principal categories of Christmas tree production can be identified: production in forest plantations and specialist horticultural production. For these two situations, suitable candidate herbicides are identified, and guidance on their safe and effective use is offered. This publication is still available in hard copy.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

150 X 210mm | 41 pages | black & white
0-11-710340-3
£7.99
Stock code:FCFB015
National Forest Inventory
1997
This Report presents the regional results for Grampian from the Forestry Commission National Inventory of Woodland and Trees: Scotland.
A4 | 24 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855383631
£5.00
Stock code:FCIR101
Field Book
Ian Willoughby, David Clay
1996
Information is given on the use of herbicides in farm woodland and short rotation coppice. Recommendations are given for suitable herbicides for a range of crop and weed species. Approval status, approved products, crop tolerance, weed susceptibility and herbicide mixtures are discussed. A lengthy appendix lists notices of approval for proprietary products. This publication is still available in hard copy.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

150 x 210mm | 60 pages | Black & white
0-11-710336-5
£5.95
Stock code:FCFB014
Bulletin
Joan Webber (Ed), John Gibbs (Ed)
1996
From time to time a calamity such as forest fire or violent storm requires that timber is salvaged quickly. Where such timber is plantation grown the investment loss that major destruction brings is catastrophic unless the most valuable timber can be saved and then marketed in an orderly way. This Bulletin reports on a successful British experience in which water storage employing overhead water sprinklers was used to prevent deterioration of high quality pine logs. This publication is available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 72 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710337-3
£12.50
Stock code:FCBU117
Field Book
Ian Willoughby, Jim Dewar
1995
A comprehensive account of chemical weed control techniques for use in forestry. Covers pesticide legislation, safety precautions and good working practices, herbicides for use against specific weed vegetation types, farm forestry weed control, protective clothing and personal equipment, application equipment and output guides, lists of herbicides and manufacturers, sources of advice, and an index of weeds and chemicals. This publication is still available in hard copy.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

136 x 234mm | 150 pages | black & white
0-11-710330-6
£9.95
Stock code:FCFB008
Bulletin
Chris Quine, Mike Coutts, Barry Gardiner, Graham Pyatt
1995
Wind damage is a serious threat to managed forests because it results in loss of timber yield, landscape quality and wildlife habitat. The most common form of wind damage in Britain is windthrow in which both stem and roots overturn. Prediction and prevention of wind damage have been important elements of forest management, and the windthrow hazard classification has been widely used to guide the selection of strategies. However, it is not possible to encompass all the knowledge of wind damage within a simple predictive system, or to detail advice for every set of circumstances that a forest manager may have to address. This Bulletin seeks to guide management by presenting a brief but comprehensive review of why and how storms damage trees, and the measures that can be adopted to mitigate such damage. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 40 pages | olour photographs
0-11-710332-2
£7.00
Stock code:FCBU114
Bulletin
Cyril Hart
1995
This Bulletin is written for landowners and foresters who wish to convert all or part of a wood or forest from pure, regular, uniform, even-aged stands to mixed, irregular, uneven-aged stands - in particular for those who desire to use silvicultural systems alternative to that of extensive clear cutting, with a view to achieving diverse structure leading to biological diversity and semi-permanent or continuous forest cover. The information provided can be adopted to suit individual owners’ or foresters’ own constraints and objectives. Other aims are to draw attention to what has been achieved in Britain, and the opportunities for further attempts, and to highlight the need for further research, trials and demonstration areas.
190 x 250mm | 120 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710334-9
£15.95
Stock code:FCBU115
Bulletin
Richard A. Mather, Peter H. Freer-Smith, Peter S. Saville
1995
A computer system was developed for mapping the Forestry Commission’s records of forest condition in Great Britain. This facility also conveniently allows forest condition records to be combined with meteorological and pollution data. The present Forestry Commission survey was evaluated to determine how well the design represented certain regional and local variations in environmental (including pollution) conditions across Great Britain. The survey was found to provide good representation over a wide range of possible combinations of meteorological and pollution conditions for the five species assessed, namely beech, oak, Sitka spruce, Norway spruce and Scots pine.
190 x 250mm | 88 pages | some colour figures
0-11-710331-4
£9.95
Stock code:FCBU116
Bulletin
J.R. Aldhous, W.L. Mason
1994
This Bulletin, written by experts in their field, describes techniques involved in successful production of bare-rooted and cell- (small container-) grown stock of the tree species most widely planted in United Kingdom forestry. The subjects covered include: formation of new nurseries; maintenance of the fertility of existing nurseries; procurement of seed; production of seedlings and transplants; production of cell-grown planting stock; the role of mycorrhizas; vegetative propagation; irrigation; weed control; control of diseases and insect and other pests; plant storage and handling; legislation affecting nursery management. References are given to supplementary sources of information. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 296 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710323-3
£25.00
Stock code:FCBU111
Bulletin
John Rodwell, Gordon Patterson
1994
This Bulletin combines expertise in woodland ecology and up-to-date silvicultural knowledge. It encourages the selection of the appropriate type of new native woodland for any particular site and gives guidance on the species composition, design and silvicultural methods which should be used in order to secure the development of the woodland ecosystem as a whole. The wide range of possible benefits from these new woods, including wood production, is recognised and the practical advice is tailored accordingly. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 100 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710320-9
£9.95
Stock code:FCBU112
Bulletin
Andy Moffat, John McNeill
1994
This Bulletin has been written to give up-to-date practical advice to people involved in the reclamation of disturbed land who wish to plant trees on the restored site. The Bulletin provides a comprehensive guide both to mineral companies, in preparing planning applications which involve proposals for forestry, and to mineral planning authorities, in considering such applications. It is also a comprehensive basis on which to plan the reclamation of derelict and other disturbed sites for tree planting. The Bulletin will facilitate the statutory consultations between mineral planning authorities and the Forestry Authority, and help people applying for support under the Forestry Commission Woodland Grant Scheme for tree planting on disturbed land.
190 x 250mm | 128 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710319-5
£12.95
Stock code:FCBU110
Bulletin
Robert Moss, Nicholas Picozzi
1994
The aim of this Bulletin is to summarise the best current information about the birds’ requirements and to provide guidelines for forest management which will benefit capercaillie. As far as possible, we base our recommendations on well-documented facts. Where hard data are not available, we make informed guesses based on anecdotal natural history and casual observations. Some of these guesses may be wrong; when we know more, we shall be able to improve upon them. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 48 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710329-9
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU113
Field Book
Forestry Commission
1993
These recommendations are agreed by Forest Enterprise, the British Timber Merchants' Association, and the UK Softwood Sawmillers Association. The normal practice of the Forestry Commission will be to classify parcels of sawlogs offered for sale into four categories: green, red, short green, and log pole, for which descriptions are given. The FC aims to maximise the proportion of green category logs, subject to appropriate stand conditions and market requirements. This publication is still available in hard copy.
100 x 205mm | 16 pages | black & white
0-11-710322-5
£2.00
Stock code:FCFB009
Field Book
G.S Patterson, B.R.S. Morrison
1993
Studies in the UK and elsewhere have shown that acid freshwater habitats have different floras and faunas and fewer species in most taxonomic groups, when compared with near-neutral waters. The presence or absence of certain common species that are sensitive to acid waters can be used to assess the prevailing chemistry of a water body. The method described in this Field Book enables managers to do this for forest streams in upland areas using a limited number of readily recognised invertebrate animals. It may also be used for streams outside woodland. The method is suitable for qualitative monitoring over a number of years to show trends in the ecological status of selected streams. This publication is still available in hard copy.
99 x 205mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-11-710317-9
£11.95
Stock code:FCFB013
Bulletin
Gordon S. Patterson
1993
Broadleaved trees and shrubs are frequently scarce in upland forests in Britain, and national policy is to increase the proportion of broadleaves because of their value as wildlife habitat. Birches (Betula pubescens Ehrh. and Betula pendula Roth.) are between them adapted to succeed on a wide range of soils and are the commonest native trees of infertile regions. The value of birches for wildlife is high for most taxonomic groups. Birch woodland is capable of increasing the fertility of some mineral soils; it supports a large number of specialist and generalist phytophagous insects and a wide variety of woodland plants, birds and mammals. When mixed into conifer stands, birch is likely to increase their diversity considerably, especially for insects and birds.
190 x 250 mm | 48 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710316-0
£5.95
Stock code:FCBU109
Bulletin
A.G. Gordon (Ed)
1992
This Bulletin comprises a series of chapters covering all phases of seed usage of commercial forestry species from source selection, through collection, processing, storage and legislation, to seed sowing; each chapter is written by individual specialists in their field. The Bulletin is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 144 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710271-7
£10.95
Stock code:FCBU083
Bulletin
D.A. Rook
1992
This Bulletin presents the information from a meeting in 1990 which was focused on Sitka spruce in Britain. The keynote speaker discussed the use of cuttings in spruce plantations throughout the world. A series of speakers then dealt with the following aspects, all of which are provided in this Bulletin: breeding strategy and levels of genetic improvement available; vegetative propagation methods; silvicultural practices for plantations of cuttings; relationship between growth and timber quality; increases in volume and revenue from the use of cuttings.
190 x 250mm | 100 pages | colour images
0-11-710305-5
£7.95
Stock code:FCBU103
Bulletin
H.W. Pepper
1992
Fencing is a necessary but expensive forest management operation. While it is possible to erect a fence that is completely effective against any animal, this is usually too costly. Any forest fence is a compromise between expense and effectiveness. The introduction of spring steel wire by the Forestry Commission into the construction of forest fences in 1969 substantially reduced costs compared with traditional forms of fencing using mild steel wire. The main advantage of spring steel wire is that once it is strained it will remain taut. This allows stakes and straining posts to be widely spaced, so requiring less material and labour without reducing the effectiveness of the fence. Small economies have been made by using spring steel wire for multi-strand and dropper fences but the most suitable application and the greatest economies are in the use of this wire to support wire netting. Further savings have been made by introducing improved methods of working and labour-saving tools. Improvements to the design and construction of fences are constantly under review. In the 23 years since 1969 new and improved materials, tools and working practices have been introduced. Any savings obtained can be wasted if the initial planning of the fence has not been thorough. The specification of the materials to be used must be consistent with the period and the purpose for which the fence is required. The amount of material required can be reduced and the problems of negotiating natural obstacles can be avoided by careful siting.
190 x 250mm | 56 pages | black and white
0-11-710304-7
£5.00
Stock code:FCBU102
Bulletin
J.F. Benson, K.G. Willis
1992
The Bulletin estimates the consumer surplus (or net monetary benefit) from informal recreation on the Forestry Commission estate. The Forestry Commission’s estate of more than 1 million hectares is managed for mutiple-use and multiple benefits. Calculations of the costs and benefits of timber production are made in financial terms using discounted cash flow models. Most of the other uses and benefits, whether informal recreation, wildlife and landscape conservation, carbon fixing or job creation in rural areas, cannot easily be evaluated in this way, either because no markets exist or because many of the benefits are ‘public’ goods. However, techniques do exist for estimating the benefits of such uses and resources in monetary terms, and these are described. A cluster analysis was used to select a representative sample of 14 Forest Districts in which recreational visitor surveys were made. Calculations of consumer surplus were based on a travel cost method of valuation. The average consumer surplus per visit is £2 at 1988 prices. The sensitivity of this result to different assumptions is examined and compared with the limited number of previous studies in Great Britain. Various estimates of visitor numbers, by Forest District and in total, are reviewed. The figures are combined to estimate a total value of £53 million per year (1988 prices) for non-priced informal recreation on the Forestry Commission estate in Great Britain. The average is £47 per hectare but with a very wide variation between the extremes £1 per hectare in remote areas to over £400 per hectare in exceptional cases such as the New Forest, related to accessibility and other factors. The total benefit exceeds the estimate of £10 million quoted by the National Audit Office in 1986.
190 x 250mm | 56 pages | colour images
0-11-710308-X
£7.50
Stock code:FCBU104
Bulletin
P.A. Robertson
1992
This Bulletin summarises the findings of a 3-year study sponsored by the Forestry Commission and carried out by the Game Conservancy. The study undertook to quantify habitat requirements of pheasants, to assess the benefits or disadvantages to pheasants of different forms of woodland management and to investigate the effects of managing woods for pheasants on other wildlife. The Bulletin aims to present management guidelines that will benefit not just winter populations, but also increase natural breeding densities of wild pheasants.
190 x 250mm | 28 pages | black and white
0-11-710315-2
£3.75
Stock code:FCBU106
Bulletin
R. Wolstenholme, J. Dutch, A.J. Moffat, C.D. Bayes, C.M.A. Taylor
1992
Sewage sludge, a mixture of solids and water produced during the treatment of waste water, can be used as a valuable fertiliser and is currently widely used as such in agriculture. Since 1981 a joint Forestry Commission/WRc research programme has evaluated the growth responses and environmental implications of sewage sludge applications to forests (Bayes et al., 1991). This programme has shown that tree growth can be significantly enhanced following sludge application (Wolstenholme et al., 1991; Dutch and Wolstenholme, in press). The experience gained from the various pilot trials and experiments has been used to develop the following guidelines for the use of sewage sludge in forestry. Research is continuing and future findings will be used to update the guidelines. Part I of the manual addresses the subject of the silvicultural value of sewage sludge as a forest fertiliser. This will assist the forest manager in selecting suitable sites where a growth response can be expected. Part II of the manual, the Code of Good Practice, deals with the practicalities of suitable application procedures and is aimed at those actively involved in these procedures, including forest managers and water industry staff.
290 x 250mm | 40 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710312-8
£5.30
Stock code:FCBU107
Bulletin
P.R. Ratcliffe, B.A. Mayle
1992
Roe deer are distributed widely in Great Britain and are managed for a number of reasons including the reduction of impact on trees and vegetation and their exploitation as a game species. Population data, especially on survivorship, on which to base management plans, are difficult to obtain and have previously been unavailable. This Bulletin gives a brief account of roe deer biology, insofar as this affects their management. It proposes a management strategy and methodology, based on deer numbers, population dynamics and habitat changes, and measurement of their impact on trees and other vegetation. Examples of population models are presented to illustrate the considerable regulatory effect of juvenile mortality on roe deer populations. The high levels of juvenile mortality appear to have been under-estimated previously, and consequently culling levels aimed at preventing population increases have been over-estimated. It appears that culls of the order of 15-25% will prevent many British roe deer populations increasing in size.
190 x 250mm | 44 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710310-1
£5.50
Stock code:FCBU105
Bulletin
R. Ferris-Kaan, G.S. Patterson
1992
Monitoring should be an integral part of conservation management in forests. It provides managers with information on the status and trend of species or habitats, and indicates whether specific goals have been achieved. Vegetation assessments can be used to monitor habitat quality as well as plant and species composition. Plants can be more easily monitored than many animals. This Bulletin provides advice on setting objectives and selecting appropriate parameters for measurement when monitoring vegetation. The need for sufficiently rigorous sampling is discussed, and measurement methods are outlined. Techniques for data interpretation are given and approaches to monitoring in different situations are described. This publication is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 44 pages | black and white
0-11-710313-6
£3.50
Stock code:FCBU108
Bulletin
S.K. Hull, J.N. Gibbs
1991
During the summer of 1987 a survey of dieback in non-woodland ash trees was undertaken in Great Britain. After excluding certain areas due to their known low ash population, two hundred 10 km squares were visited and detailed data collected on the condition of ash in a plot selected within each square. Information was obtained on 4454 ash trees, and also on 1022 oak trees which were encountered in the plots. The overall incidence of dieback was 19% in the sample of ash and 18% in the sample of oak. In ash, the condition was found to occur mainly in the east of the country, with areas of greatest damage, both in terms of proportion of trees affected and degree of crown loss, being found in the south-east Midlands. The healthiest trees were found in the west of the country, in particular in Wales. Large ash trees were found to be suffering more from dieback than small trees and single trees more than trees in groups. The condition was found to be more common on rendzina and gley soils than on brown earths, podzols and ‘unclassified’ soils. Trees in the countryside had a much higher incidence of dieback than did urban trees (20% compared with 11% respectively). Among rural trees, associations were found with various kinds of current agricultural practice. Thus the incidence of damage in trees surrounded by arable land was 38% compared with 10% for trees surrounded by grassland. There was also a greater incidence of damage in trees near to roads (23%) than in trees away from roads (12%). Finally, where there was an adjacent ditch, the likelihood of dieback was substantially increased. The data for oak followed a similar pattern to ash except that no effect of the presence of a ditch could be detected. Correlations of damage with rainfall and pollution variables were calculated. Ash dieback was negatively correlated with rainfall and several relationships emerged with pollution variables; the strongest being positive relationships for ‘arable only’ trees. With oak some negative correlations were found with rainfall and pollution.
190 x 250mm | 44 pages | colour figures and images
0-11-710289-X
£4.80
Stock code:FCBU093
Bulletin
S.J. Hodge (Ed)
1991
This Bulletin records the proceedings of a seminar held at York University in April 1990, organised jointly by the Arboricultural Association and the Forestry Commission. The seminar was the third of its kind, held every 5 years, since 1980, updating the arboriculture industry on current arboriculture research in the United Kingdom. Twenty-six papers are presented under the section headings: setting the scene, amenity tree establishment, trees in towns, tree stability, tree health, disorders of amenity trees, arboriculture safety, and concluding remarks.
190 x 250mm | 236 pages | colour images
0-11-710297-0
£17.50
Stock code:FCBU097
Bulletin
J.N. Smithies
1991
The dimensional accuracy with which timber is sawn is important both for its marketability and for its economic production. This Bulletin describes quality control techniques that can be used for sampling and measuring sawn timber taken from the production line in softwood sawmills. The dimensions obtained from the measuring process can be used to quantify and analyse the accuracy with which timber is being produced in the sawmill. The results obtained from the analysis of the measurements can then be used to give pointers as to which part of the production line should be examined to improve or optimise the sawing accuracy.
190 x 250mm | 32 pages | colour images
0-11-710295-4
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU096
Bulletin
J.L. Innes, R.C. Boswell
1991
The results of the 1990 forest condition monitoring programme are presented. A total of 7644 trees were assessed in the main Forestry Commission monitoring programme in 1990. Five species were examined: Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), Norway spruce (P. abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), oak (Quercus spp.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica), distributed over 319 sites. This represents an increase on 1989, and was attributable to an increase in the number of oak plots assessed. Data completeness was high, exceeding 97% in each species. There was a lack of consistency in the way in which individual observers assessed some of the indices. This limited the manner in which the data could be analysed. For example, differences between observers meant that it was not possible to produce reliable maps of specific indices of forest condition. However, assessments of one of the most important of the indices, crown density, were considerably more consistent between surveyors than in previous years.
190 x 250mm | 68 pages | colour images
0-11-710298-9
£7.50
Stock code:FCBU098
Bulletin
S.J. Hodge
1991
Little information is available on the growth rates of urban trees. Trees that survive the establishment phase often put on so little growth that they appear moribund. Conversely, problems occur when a fast growing or large species is successfully established and ‘outgrows’ its living space. There is a need to build up a database of information on the structure and health of the urban tree population in order to determine recommendations that will improve the planning and design of urban tree planting and the performance of trees once planted. Funding from the Department of the Environment enabled a survey to be undertaken in 1989 by Forestry Commission Research Division staff. This survey encompassed 3600 trees, made up of 120 trees in each of 30 randomly selected towns and cities throughout England.
190 x 250mm | 36 pages | colour images
0-11-710299-7
£3.50
Stock code:FCBU099
Bulletin
C.M.A. Taylor
1991
In Britain the use of fertilisers has greatly increased the productivity of forests growing on nutrient-poor soils. In fact, many sites could not otherwise have been successfully afforested. From the early pioneering work of Stirling-Maxwell to the present day, the Forestry Commission has continually tested rates and types of fertiliser and methods of application. A pattern has gradually emerged from these empirical experiments indicating the fertiliser requirements of the main tree species planted. This has been aided by complementary basic research on forest nutrition, particularly at the Macaulay Institute, Edinburgh University and the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology. This Bulletin attempts to condense this research into practical guidance for the forest manager. The Bulletin is intended to supplement field experience and to aid rational decision-making. It is designed to present current knowledge in a structured fashion to assist programme planning at both regional and local level. It can also be used for indicating nutrient requirements on specific sites, although interpretation will require greater care and field verification will be essential.
190 x 250mm | 60 pages | colour images
0-11-710294-6
£5.75
Stock code:FCBU095
Bulletin
B.J.W.Greig, S.C. Gregory, R.G. Strouts
1991
Honey fungus is one of the commonest root diseases of trees and shrubs in the world. It can kill an enormous range of plants and also causes decay in standing trees. It is rarely a major problem in woodland although it sometimes kills large groups of conifers in young plantations. The disease is more serious in parks, gardens, orchards and arboreta.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-11-710301-2
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU100
Bulletin
M.C. Dobson
1991
The damage caused by de-icing salt is a serious, but often underestimated, problem which affects substantial numbers of roadside trees and shrubs both in Britain and abroad. This Bulletin has resulted from an extensive review of the world literature on the subject; the findings fall into four distinct categories which comprise its four chapters. Chapter 1 describes the early investigations that led to the recognition of salt as a cause of street tree death, and outlines the current situation in Britain. In Chapter 2 the methods used for evaluating salt tolerance are described and the mechanisms of salt tolerance are outlined. The mechanisms of salt toxicity are described in Chapter 3, and the relative importance of osmotic and specific ion effects in the development of injury symptoms are discussed. The methods that are being used, or could be used, to reduce de-icing salt damage to trees are evaluated in Chapter 4. This Bulletin is available to buy in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 76 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710302-0
£6.75
Stock code:FCBU101
Field Book
Forestry Commission
1990
These recommendations are agreed by Forest Enterprise, the British Timber Merchants' Association, and the UK Softwood Sawmillers Association. The normal practice of the Forestry Commission will be to classify parcels of sawlogs offered for sale into four categories: green, red, short green, and log pole, for which descriptions are given. The FC aims to maximise the proportion of green category logs, subject to appropriate stand conditions and market requirements. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
100 x 205mm | 16 pages | black & white
0-11-710280-6
£2.00
Stock code:FCFB009
Field Book
A.F. Mitchell, V.E. Hallett, J.E.J. White
1990
This listing includes species down to a considerable degree of rarity and only the very rarest, which have too few known specimens to compete effectively as tallest and stoutest are excluded; but where one specimen is clearly of outstanding size it is included even where very few are known. The more important cultivars are included. The total numbers listed are 548 species (188 conifers and 360 broadleaves) with 169 cultivars and varieties. The total number of entries is 1169. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
148 x 210mm | 33 pages | black & white
0-11-710286-5
£3.80
Stock code:FCFB010
Field Book
Forestry Commission
1990
This Field Book provides tables for estimating the volume of logs using the traditional mid diameter method. Although it is a very accurate method, it becomes less accurate as the length increases. The volume is derived from the product of the length of the log and its mean cross-sectional area. In practice it is the diameter at the mid point which is actually measured. This publication is no longer available to order in hard copy.
99 x 205mm | 84 pages | Black and White
0-11-710287-3
£3.65
Stock code:FCFB011
Field Book
J.L. Innes
1990
Forest condition is now assessed annually in most European countries. This Field Book provides details of assessment procedures used by the Forestry Commission in their main monitoring programme. Although this programme is restricted to Sitka spruce, Norway spruce, Scots pine, oak and beech, the techniques that are described are applicable with little or no modification to most other tree species. Crown density indices for the main conifers and broadleaves grown in Britain’s forests are illustrated in a sequence of colour photographs (five photographs for each species). While emphasis has been placed on the assessment of crown density, a variety of other indices are also used. These are described and an assessment system is provided for each parameter. The additional indices enable a full description to be made of the condition of a tree. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
150 x 210mm | 96 pages | colour images
0-11-710283-0
£15.00
Stock code:FCFB012
Bulletin
T.R. Nisbet
1990
This Bulletin reviews the evidence for a suggested forest effect in the acidification of surface waters in Great Britain. Acid deposition from the atmosphere within susceptible areas of Britain has affected fresh water flora and fauna, causing the decline and in some instances the complete loss of fish populations. Currently there is a debate about whether the presence of forests has increased the acidity of surface waters and contributed to the observed decline. The evidence for the significance and scale of such a forest effect is by no means clear and only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies undertaken so far. Long-term monitoring of streamwater chemistry within individual catchments is being undertaken. In due course the results of these studies will allow researchers to come to firm conclusions regarding the extent of any forest acidification effect.
190 x 250mm | 20 pages | black and white
0-11-710279-2
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU086
Bulletin
G. Shaw, A. Dowell
1990
Barn owl numbers have declined over much of the British Isles. However, in northern Britain afforestation has resulted in some local increases. Young plantations with rank grassy vegetation contain large numbers of field voles which are the main food of barn owls. Abandoned farm buildings provide nest sites for the owls, but these deteriorate and are unavailable for nesting by the time the forest is felled and foraging conditions are again suitable for bam owls. Even in afforested areas, the low density of buildings may limit the population of bam owls. This Bulletin presents a summary of the work in forests of south-west Scotland where surplus nestboxes were provided to see if the density of barn owls could be increased. During three years when field vole populations were increasing, the barn owl population in the nestboxes increased from 0 to 31 pairs, demonstrating that the bam owl population had previously been limited by a lack of nest sites. Barn owls were abundant on the farmland area adjacent to the forest, and chicks produced from these traditional sites colonised the forest sites. Recommendations are also given on how the results from this study may be applied in other forests.
190 x 250mm | 20 pages | colour figures and images
0-11-710291-1
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU090
Bulletin
C.M.A Taylor, P.M. Tabbush
1990
On moorland and heathland soils in Great Britain nitrogen deficiency can severely restrict the growth of certain conifer species, including Sitka spruce, the main commercial species. Until the 1970s this was thought to be due solely to competition from heather and was commonly known as 'heather check’. However, increased planting of Sitka spruce on very nutrient-poor soils revealed that, even after removal of heather by herbicide treatment, growth was still limited by low availability of nitrogen. This can be caused by limited soil nitrogen capital and/or slow rate of nitrogen mineralisation. Application of nitrogen fertiliser can overcome this deficiency although several applications may be required to achieve full canopy closure. Once this stage is reached demand for nutrients is reduced due to shading of competing vegetation, improved nutrient cycling and capture of atmospheric nutrients and further inputs of nitrogen should not be required. The major difficulty facing forest managers in determining the treatment of a nitrogen deficient stand is deciding whether heather control, application of nitrogen fertiliser, or a combination of both, will yield the most cost-effective response on any given site. This Bulletin explains the background to the problem, categorises the range of site types involved, and advises on the treatment available. This Bulletin is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 36 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710290-3
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU089
Bulletin
J.D. Brazier
1990
Farmers are being encouraged to grow trees on surplus agricultural land as part of government policy effected through the Farm Woodland Scheme. The efficient production of timber is profitable, providing raw material for industry, yet it does not preclude other important objectives such as landscape design, amenity considerations, game management and wildlife conservation. The production of high quality timber is paramount if investment in woodlands is to be realised. This Bulletin describes the characteristics and uses of 15 hardwood and 8 softwood timbers of trees suitable for farm woodland planting. This Bulletin is still available in hardcopy.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710284-9
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU091
Bulletin
J.L. Innes, R.C. Boswell
1990
The results of the 1989 forest condition monitoring programme are presented. A total of 7436 trees were assessed, with the species being restricted to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), Norway spruce (P. abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), oak (Quercus spp.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica). Crown condition is now assessed on the basis of a variety of indices rather than crown density alone. This enables a full evaluation of the health of individual trees to be made. However, as many of the indices have not been assessed previously, it is not possible to determine whether the figures depict a departure from the normal pattern of tree health that might be expected in pristine environmental conditions.
190 x 250mm | 72 pages | some colour figures
0-11-710293-8
£8.50
Stock code:FCBU094
Bulletin
J. Jobling
1990
The eleven chapters comprising this Bulletin cover the botany, cultivation, performances and utilisation of poplars and poplar timber. The genus Populus comprises some 32 species classified according to their botanical characters into five sections and one sub-section. Of these, the sections Aigeiros (the black poplars) and Tacamahaca (the balsam poplars) are of commercial significance to poplar growers in Britain and Europe. The species are described in Chapter 2 together with all the hybrids and cultivars thought to have been or to be noteworthy in Britain. The species are described first within their respective sections followed by their specific cultivars and then by the hybrids within and between sections. In Chapter 3 a key attempts to assist the field recognition of most of the commercially important poplars grown in Britain based on morphological characters and crown form. In Chapter 4 the choice of sites suitable for poplar cultivation is explained, with advice on the field recognition of both suitable and unsuitable sites. Plant production is covered in Chapter 5 which describes the main methods and vegetative and seedling reproduction and nursery practice. The next two chapters cover the silviculture of poplars including establishment and tending practices in Britain and Europe and, in Chapter 7, recommendations on spacing, thinning and pruning to meet various objectives. Rates of growth of poplars under various conditions are discussed in Chapter 8 with examples of some outstanding cultivars and with summaries of research data currently available on yields for biomass and timber. In Chapter 9 the use of poplars in association with farming is described with particular reference to the development of agroforestry practice in Britain during the 1960s and 70s. The characteristics and properties of poplar timber and its uses are then described. The final chapter provides a general description of the more important insect pests, fungal and bacterial diseases of poplar. The Bulletin concludes with a short reference list, appendices and indexes.
190 x 250mm | 100 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710285-7
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU092
Field Book
D.R. Williamson, P.B. Lane
1989
The Book contains recommendations for the use of herbicides in the forest. In this context, forestry includes the establishment of trees in new plantations, restocking of forests and woodlands, shelterbelts and ride side edges. Control of weeds around trees in parks and gardens is not covered by these recommendations. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

136 x 234mm | 151 pages | black and white
0-11-710270-9
£4.00
Stock code:FCFB008
Field Book
F.T. Dry, J.A. Hipkin
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-228-7
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB007
Field Book
J.H. Gauld, J.S. Bell, A.J. Nolan, A. Lilley
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-226-0
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB005
Field Book
D.J. Henderson, G. Hudson
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | black and white with colour images
0-85538-225-2
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB004
Field Book
G. Hudson, C.J. Bown
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | colour images
0-85538-227-9
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB006
Field Book
W.Towers, D.W. Futty
1989
The land capability classification for forestry is based on an assessment of the degree of limitation imposed by the physical factors of soil, topography and climate on the growth of trees and on silvicultural practices. The principal tree species considered are those broadleaves and conifers commonly grown in Britain, and the classification assumes a skilled management level that will include cultivation, drainage, fertiliser application and weed control where these are necessary. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
149 x 209mm | 24 pages | black and white with colour section
0-85538-224-4
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB003
Bulletin
S.J. Petty
1989
The goshawk is a large bird of prey which was re-introduced into Britain in the 1960s and 1970s. Populations are now beginning to expand, particularly in areas with large forests, and where human persecution is not a limiting factor. It is predicted that goshawks will become relatively common in some parts of Britain by the early 1990s. They are generally considered a spectacular and welcome addition to forest wildlife. Goshawks are vulnerable to both accidental and wilful human disturbance when they are breeding. Recommendations are given for the management of nesting areas, together with a background of the history of goshawks in B ritain, their requirem ents, population density and the legislation which gives them full protection.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710269-5
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU081
Bulletin
M.A. Pritchard (Ed)
1989
Computer-based systems are now commonplace in most forestry operating environments. One of the inherent features of forestry everywhere is the amount of data collected over long periods of time. Information technology has made the storage and analysis of these data a cost effective reality. Never before has the forest manager been better placed to call upon these data, analyse them and turn them into meaningful information. Furthermore, the opportunities for testing the likely effects of different courses of action are now extensive. This analysis and interpretation, coupled with an understanding of past events, is an essential prerequisite of good forest planning. As the major body linking forest scientists, IUFRO provides the ideal forum for exchanging information and stimulating new ideas and concepts. This Bulletin is a record of the exchanges shared by forest scientists within IUFRO at the symposium held in Edinburgh in July 1988.
190 x 250mm | 168 pages | black and white
0-11-710272-5
£12.00
Stock code:FCBU082
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1989
This Bulletin explains the taxation of woodlands for the benefit of woodland occupiers (and their advisers). Part 1 deals with income tax and corporation tax following the major changes to the taxation of commercial woodlands made by the Finance Act 1988. Part 2 deals with the application of capital gains tax to disposals of woodlands. Part 3 deals with liability to inheritance tax (and capital transfer tax which it replaced) for lifetime gifts made after 26 March 1974 and for deaths after 12 March 1975. Part 4 deals with liability to estate duty for deaths before 13 March 1975. Any enquiry about income tax, corporation tax and capital gains tax should be addressed to the Inspector of Taxes to whom the woodland occupier normally makes his tax returns. Any enquiry about inheritance tax, capital transfer tax, or estate duty should be sent to the appropriate Capital Taxes Office.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | black and white
0-11-710274-1
£2.50
Stock code:FCBU084
Bulletin
C.J. King, N.J. Fielding
1989
The great European spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus micans) was first identified as a breeding species in Britain in 1982. This insect’s distribution, pest status, biology, life cycle and control methods are described. Although its present population is limited to Wales, the English West Midlands and Lancashire, it is well established. Infestations are characterised by scattered groups of attacked trees which display symptoms of resin bleeding and resin tubes upon their trunks.
190 x 250mm | 28 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710276-8
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU085
Bulletin
J.L. Innes, R.C. Boswell
1989
The condition of forests in the United Kingdom is monitored through two projects undertaken by the Forestry Commission. The first, referred to throughout this publication as the long-term monitoring project, was started in 1984. It was developed in response to a growing concern that air pollution might be affecting the condition of trees in Britain. The second project, referred to as the European Community (EC) forest health inventory, was started in 1987 as a direct result of European Community legislation (Commission Regulation (EEC) No. 1696/87). The results of both projects are presented separately in this Bulletin. The majority of the Bulletin is concerned with the longterm monitoring project; results from the EC forest health inventory are summarised towards the end.
190 x 250mm | 84 pages | colour figures
0-11-710277-6
£8.80
Stock code:FCBU088
Bulletin
A.J. Grayson (Ed)
1989
The storm which struck south-east England on the night of 15/16 October 1987 was the worst in the region since 1703: it caused more damage to woodlands and trees than any other recorded gale in Britain. Some 4 million cubic metres of timber were blown, equivalent to about 5 years’ cut in the seven worst affected counties. Broadleaved trees predominated and 72% of the damage occurred to privately owned woodlands and trees. The Forestry Commission set up a Forest Windblow Action Committee shortly after the storm for the purpose of assessing the damage, advising on the clearance and marketing of timber and recommending any action considered appropriate. A major concern was the potential degrade of logs left unharvested. Losses in value from this cause have not been as high as originally feared. Supplies of wood in other parts of the country were held back and many contractors moved teams into the affected region. Clearance of some 65% of the blown volume had been achieved by June 1989. However, some trees of lower value species or smaller sizes and in inaccessible sites are likely never to be cleared. Supplements to the Forestry Commission’s normal planting grants were made available for replanting blown woodlands. In addition, £9 millions were provided for restoration of non-woodland trees over 3 years. Useful lessons were learnt on the way to deal with such emergencies, including the value of a focal point for information and advice. In the south-east, it is clear that a wider range of tree ages in the growing stock would have reduced the scale of the catastrophe.
190 x 250mm | 64 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710278-4
£4.00
Stock code:FCBU087
Field Book
Tim Rollinson
1988
This Field Book provides a simple guide to the control of volume to be removed when marking a thinning. There are three sections. The first section describes the Yield Class system and the assessment of yield class in a stand. The second section covers thinning practice, that is, the type, intensity and cycle of thinning, how to calculate the thinning yield, the timing of thinning, and how the thinning is controlled. The final section describes the field procedures for estimation of top height, basal area and volume marked, and how to calculate mean diameter. A checklist of the office and field procedures to be followed when marking a thinning is printed on page 56 inside the back cover. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
100 x 200mm | 56 pages | black and white with colour curves
0-11-710256-3
£3.95
Stock code:FCFB002
Bulletin
J.L. Innes, R.C. Boswell
1988
The aim of this part of the report is to interpret, as far as possible, the results of the 1987 survey of forest health (Bulletin 74) by attempting to establish the cause(s) of the low crown densities and the crown discoloration observed in five of our most important tree species: Sitka spruce, Norway spruce, Scots pine, beech and oak.
190 x 250mm | 56 pages | some colour figures
0-11-710264-4
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU079
Bulletin
S.N. Pryor
1988
The silvicultural characteristics of Prunus avium are described, based on a study in which over 40 stands throughout Britain were visited.
190 x 250mm | 28 pages | black and white
0-11-710260-1
£2.30
Stock code:FCBU075
Bulletin
T. Harding
1988
This Bulletin provides the information for specifiers and users to make maximum use of the increasing British resource of softwoods. Its main purpose is to establish the link between requirements for current and potential end-uses and the properties and performance of these commercially important timbers. A guide to the properties of the individual species is also given for those readers whose main interest is in the timber itself, or in comparisons between species, rather than in specific uses.
190 x 250mm | 46 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710262-8
£5.50
Stock code:FCBU077
Bulletin
H. Insley (Ed)
1988
This Bulletin is intended to provide farmers and farm advisers who are planning to enter farm woodland planting and management with the management information required to plan and budget the operation. It seeks to achieve this by providing the facts farmers need to gear up their businesses in terms of planning, financial and operational aspects of woodland management, tailored to suit their individual circumstances.
190 x 250mm | 152 pages | black and white
0-11-710266-0
£6.95
Stock code:FCBU080
Bulletin
P.M. Tabbush
1988
Current upland restocking practice was reviewed in Forestry Commission Leaflet 84 Guide to upland restocking practice. Recent research, both in the UK and overseas, has led to a greater understanding of the establishment process, and the intention here is to draw this body of knowledge together as a basis for the design of improved systems for upland restocking.
190 x 250mm | 28 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710261-X
£3.50
Stock code:FCBU076
Bulletin
J. Evans
1988
Natural regeneration can broadly be defined as raising a forest crop without resorting to planting, direct sowing or coppicing. It is the random nature of exactly where young trees spring up on a site and sometimes of the species which grow that marks out natural regeneration, not freedom from man’s influence. Indeed, many naturally regenerated stands are highly artificial, being the result of frequent intervention before, during and after the regeneration phase to achieve specific well-defined ends. The bulk of natural regeneration concerns raising high forest from seed directly from parent trees. Occasionally stems arising from sucker growth or recruited by singling and storing coppice shoots are a useful supplement to growth from seed or an appropriate system in their own right. They are mentioned briefly.
190 x 250mm | 50 pages | black and white
0-11-710263-6
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU078
Field Book
Forestry Commission
1987
This Field Book describes the top diameter method for estimating the volume of logs which is usually confined to softwood sawlogs. This method is less time consuming and so cheaper than the more traditional mid diameter method and is best suited to batches of uniform length logs. The description of logs in terms of top diameter and length provides a useful basis for size classification. This publication is no longer available in hard copy.
100 x 200mm | 25 pages | black and white
0-85538-402-6
£2.50
Stock code:FCFB001
Bulletin
S.R. Leather, J.T. Stoakley, H.F. Evans
1987
This Bulletin presents the papers which were given at a workshop held at the end of 1984 to bring together a wide range of researchers, within and outwith the Forestry Commission, working on problems presented by the new and sudden occurrence in the late 1970s of large scale and severe outbreaks of the Pine beauty moth (Panolis flammea) in Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) plantations in Scotland.
190 x 250mm | 96 pages | black and white
0-11-710205-9
£5.60
Stock code:FCBU067
Bulletin
D. Patch (Ed)
1987
This Bulletin presents the proceedings of a seminar held at the University of York, 10-12 April 1985, by the Forestry Commission and the Arboricultural Association.
190 x 250mm | 200 pages | black and white
0-11-710203-2
£8.50
Stock code:FCBU065
Bulletin
R. Lines
1987
Choice of seed origin can be a very critical stage in forest management, in some cases resulting either in flourishing plantations or else in complete failure. This Bulletin is directed at both manager and researchers. The former are succinctly guided to appropriate seed origins for their site conditions and objectives, and equally importantly warned off unsuitable sources. It is very much in the grower’s interest that he should be sufficiently knowledgeable to specify his preferred, acceptable or unacceptable seed origins. Researchers, who may wish to investigate seed origin variation in greater detail, are led into the extensive literature which supports this neccessarily condensed publication.
190 x 250mm | 72 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710204-0
£5.20
Stock code:FCBU066
Bulletin
G.M.L. Locke
1987
This Bulletin describes the survey methods adopted for the census of woodlands and trees carried out between 1979 and 1982, discusses the main results of the investigation, and compares them with those of past surveys. It supplements the area and volume results which have already been published for counties and Conservancies in England and Wales, for Regions and Conservancies in Scotland, for the three countries, and for Great Britain as a whole.
190 x 250mm | 144 pages | black and white
0-11-710202-4
£8.50
Stock code:FCBU063
Bulletin
T.J.D. Rollinson, J.Evans
1987
This Bulletin reports on coppice growth and yield in relation to site and various stand characteristics and shows how volume or weight per hectare may be predicted from very simple measurements.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | blakc and white
0-11-710131-1
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU064
Bulletin
D. Lonsdale, D. Wainhouse
1987
Beech bark disease is considered to be the most serious disease affecting British beech, although its severity varies geographically and temporally. Early records indicate that the disease was first observed at least 150 years ago, but must certainly have been affecting trees from a much earlier date. The insect and fungus both occur over much of the European range of Fagus sylvatica and the disease occurs in many forests within this area. The disease has also occurred since the early years of this century on American beech, Fagus grandifolia, in north-eastern USA and south-eastern Canada following the accidental introduction of C. fagisuga to Nova Scotia around 1890 and its subsequent spread to areas further west and south-west. The disease can be most simply described as the result of sequential attack by insect and fungus. This Bulletin considers this model first and then discusses the more complex aspects of disease development.
190 x 250mm | 24 pages | some colour photographs
0-11-710207-5
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU069
Bulletin
D.C. Mitlin
1987
This Bulletin describes the development of the long-term price assumptions used by the Forestry Commission for estimating future timber revenues.
190 x 250mm | 20 pages | black and white
0-11-710206-7
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU068
Bulletin
P.M. Tabbush, D.R. Williamson
1987
Rhododendron ponticum is an evergreen shrub which forms dense thickets up to 5 metres in height. The large purple blooms appear in spring and are an attractive sight which has become commonplace especially on forested slopes in the west of the British Isles. Foresters are familiar with it as a most intractable weed, indeed control may be so costly that it cannot be justified purely in terms of benefits to wood production. Because of its dense shade, acid litter and toxic foliage, invasion is accompanied by severe impoverishment of the native flora and fauna.
190 x 250mm | 16 pages | black and white
0-11-710254-7
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU073
Bulletin
P.R. Ratcliffe
1987
This Bulletin is primarily concerned with the management of resident populations of red deer in commercial forests, and gives practical prescriptions for deer management based upon sound data collection and scientific method. All such prescriptions must be aimed at particular, well-defined deer populations occupying discrete ranges. There is an important emphasis throughout upon predictive management, rather than a retrospective ‘shutting the stable door’ response to unacceptable conditions. The assessment of population size and birth and death rates is explained together with their use as a basis for setting cull levels.
190 x 250mm | 32 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710210-5
£2.35
Stock code:FCBU071
Bulletin
J.L. Innes
1987
The aim of this Bulletin is to summarise the current information available on the interactions between air pollution and forests. While it is primarily concerned with Great Britain, air pollution is an international problem, so information from other countries has been included. Pollution from point sources, such as aluminium smelters and brickworks, has not been included, and this paper deals mainly with long-range pollution and its possible regional-scale effects. A technical account of the formation of atmospheric pollutants is given. This is followed by a more general discussion of acidification and its effects on the environment. The symptoms shown by trees involved in the forest decline seen on the continent are described together with data from various national surveys; a major part of the report is concerned with the possible causes of this decline and its economic implications. Finally, research being undertaken by the Forestry Commission into the possible effects of air pollution on trees is described.
190 x 250mm | 44 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710209-1
£2.60
Stock code:FCBU070
Bulletin
R. Worrell
1987
The research described in this Bulletin integrates the main environmental factors influencing the growth of Sitka spruce at high elevations in order to estimate future yield class.
190 x 250mm | 20 pages | black and white
0-11-710253-9
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU072
Bulletin
J.L. Innes, R.C. Boswell
1987
An annual forest health survey has been conducted in Great Britain since 1984 (Binns et al., 1985, 1986; Innes el al., 1986). From the outset, the survey has been designed to determine both the extent of any deterioration in crown condition and, if possible, its causes. Over the years a number of changes have been made in the survey as more information has become available on the extent and nature of forest decline in central Europe and on possible causal factors. This year sees the most substantial changes yet.
190 x 250mm | 28 pages | black and white
0-11-710259-8
£2.00
Stock code:FCBU074
Bulletin
B. G. Hibberd
1986
A summary of methods of establishing, maintaining and harvesting forest crops with advice on planning and other management considerations for owners, agents and foresters.
190 x 250mm | 116 pages | black and white | 10th edition
0-11-710156-7
£5.25
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
J. Evans
1984
The object of this Bulletin is to assist all who are concerned with the management or cultivation of broadleaves. Much practical silvicultural advice is included and many recommendations are made with the main emphasis on the silvicultural techniques used to grow good quality timber. But broadleaved woodlands are important for much more than timber production and the silvicultural requirements to serve other objectives such as landscape, conservation and sporting, are also covered.
190 x 250mm | 244 pages | black and white
0-11-710154-0
£9.50
Stock code:FCBU062
Bulletin
G.H. Moeller (Ed), D.T. Seal (Ed)
1984
This Bulletin contains papers presented at the second Subject Group meeting held at Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, Scotland, 25 July-1 August 1983. The need for efficient transfer of new forestry knowledge is critical throughout all the various IUFRO Subject Groups. Group S6.08 serves as a clearing-house for ideas related to procedures, processes and methods for application of forestry research. Section I deals with approaches that have been used by various countries to encourage the transfer and application of new forestry information. Section II contains 10 papers that describe both successful and unsuccessful case examples of technology transfer efforts.
190 x 250mm | 128 pages | black and white
0-11-710155-9
£6.50
Stock code:FCB61
Bulletin
D.A. Burdekin (Ed)
1983
This Bulletin contains the proccedings of the European Economic Community Research Seminar, Guernsey, Channel Islands, 30th March — 1st April 1982. The papers summarise the results of recent research undertaken by scientists from six members of the European Community.
190 x 250mm | 126 pages | black and white
0-11-710153-2
£6.00
Stock code:FCBU060
Bulletin
C.I. Carter, N.R. Maslen
1982
This Bulletin contains Field keys and morphological keys with descriptions and illustrations for the identifications of the 27 aphids of the family Lachnidae known to occur on conifers in Britain. The strong influence of their host plant upon these insects and the impact some of them have on the growth of forest trees and amenity plantations throughout the world is discussed. The importance of conifer aphid honeydew from various species in the production of forest honey is reviewed. Accounts of each species include recent synonymy, descriptions of morphs, type of life cycle, host plants, distribution and economic importance.
185 x 250mm | 84 pages | black and white
0-11-710151-6
£3.50
Stock code:FCBU058
Bulletin
A.G. Gordon, D.C.F. Rowe
1982
The aims of this manual are two-fold. Firstly it presents the practical plant propagator with all the relevant information he needs to ensure reliable production from seed of the more commonly grown ornamental broadleaved species. It includes the latest results of the Forestry Commission’s own work and summarises existing in formation gleaned from experienced nurserymen and the literature.The second aim of this manual is to provide the student and interested amateur with a complete scientific background to the subject of raising trees and shrubs from seed, and to act as a reference volume should they wish to pursue their interest more deeply. It will also act as a handbook for anyone involved in seed collection, seed testing and storage.
185 x 250mm | 144 pages | black and white
0-11-710152-4
£5.00
Stock code:FCBU059
Bulletin
O. N. Blatchford
1978
A summary of methods of establishing, maintaining and harvesting forest crops with advice on planning and other management considerations for owners, agents and foresters.
190 x 250mm | 172 pages | black and white | 9th edition
0-11-710150-8
Free
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
D.J. Turner
1977
This Bulletin contains information on the properties, manufacture and uses of 2, 4-D and 2, 4. 5-T as well as the possible side effects of these herbicides which are reviewed in detail.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

185 x 250mm | 60 pages | black and white
0-11-710149-4
£1.20
Stock code:FCBU057
Bulletin
A.J. Grayson (Ed)
1976
At the Fifteenth Congress of the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (I.U.F.R.O.) held at Gainesville, Florida in March 1970, a Working Party was set up to consider methods of evaluating the contribution of Forestry to economic development. This Bulletin contains the papers presented at the meeting of this Working Party together with a report of the discussions held in the Headquarters of the Forestry Commission in Edinburgh in the autumn of 1975.
185 x 250mm | 128 pages | black and white
0-11-710148-6
£3.00
Stock code:FCBU056
Bulletin
G.J. Hamilton (Ed)
1976
This Bulletin contains the papers presented at a meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (IUFRO) Project Group P4.02 'Economics and Harvesting of Thinnings', held in Edinburgh from 30 September until 2 October 1974.Papers were invited on various aspects of thinning. The first session (Papers 1-7) mainly concerned the yield aspects of thinning. The second session (Papers 8-10) was devoted principally to the damage caused to sites and stands by harvesting operations. The third session (Papers 11-15), covered, in the main, the harvesting operation. The papers are given more or less in the order in which they were presented, and a much shortened edited version of the discussion attending each paper is given immediately following the paper.
185 x 250mm | 148 pages | black and white
0-11-710147-8
£2.50
Stock code:FCBU055
Bulletin
Roy Faulkner (Ed)
1975
This Bulletin provides detailed information about all aspects of seed orchards, seed management and tree breeding. Spilt over 14 chapters, each written by separate specialists, the information presented is intended to provide a useful source of reference for practising orchardists and as a general textbook for university forestry courses which include tree breeding as a subject in their curriculum.
185 x 250mm | 180 pages | black and white
0-11-710146-X
£2.30
Stock code:FCBU054
Bulletin
Alan J. Low
1975
The production and use of tubed conifer seedlings in Britain have been studied between 1968 and 1973 in an extensive research and development programme based initially on Canadian practice. Results from the many nursery and forest experiments are described and form the basis for practical recommendations (see Chapter 6) on raising and planting tubed seedlings.
185 x 250mm | 78 pages | black and white
0-11-710145-1
£1.00
Stock code:FCBU053
Bulletin
J.R. Aldhous, A.J. Low
1974
This report is the result of the work of staff from many sections within the Forestry Commission and of the Princes Risborough Laboratory of the Building Research Establishment, Department of the Environment. In 1967 it was decided to undertake a comprehensive evaluation of the status and potential of the four most important “minor species” in British forestry, Western hemlock, Western red cedar, Grand fir and Noble fir. This report is based on the results of detailed assessments in stands selected to represent different sites and growth rates over the country as a whole, as far as this was possible from the limited range of stands of some minor species. These data have been combined with results from over 150 silvicultural experiments. Information on timber properties has also been summarised, using reports from Princes Risborough Laboratory (formerly Forest Products Research Laboratory) as an important source.
185 x 250mm | 132 pages | black and white
0-11-710141-9
£1.50
Stock code:FCBU049
Bulletin
R.F. Wood
1974
This is an account of research work undertaken or supported by the Forestry Commission during the first fifty years of its life.
185 x 250mm | 190 pages | black and white
0
£1.75
Stock code:FCBU050
Bulletin
G.J. Hamilton, J.M. Christie
1974
The analysis described in this paper was designed to provide quantitative information on the effects of spacing on yield and the components of yieid. It is preceded by a brief review of the more important features of the history of these spacing experiments.
185 x 250mm | 100 pages | black and white
0-11-710144-3
£0.80
Stock code:FCBU052
Bulletin
W.O. Wittering
1974
ln 1959, when the Forestry Commission’s annual expenditure on weeding in the forest exceeded £1 million for the first time, the Work Study Branch was instructed to study the problem in all its aspects. Work was initially concentrated on hand weeding and the tools associated with it. Later studies of chemical and mechanical methods have resulted in the Commission adopting techniques which have given very substantial savings in costs. At the end of eleven years of intensive effort, i.e. in 1970, the weeding account stood at £0.7 million. In real terms, allowing for the decreasing value of money resulting from inflation, a true saving of 44% overall (7-2% com pound per annum ) had been achieved. Costs of the various methods of weeding are given together with advice on how to select the most suitable method. Protection of the worker is dealt with in detail. New methods, such as ultra low volume spraying, which are being studied at present, are discussed.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

185 x 250mm | 232 pages | black and white
0-11-710140-0
£2.10
Stock code:FCBU048
Bulletin
B.G. Jackson
1974
The study represents the boldest attempt so far made in Britain to create a model of the two activities of wood-producing and primary processing of wood. On the basis of specified assumptions about future costs, interest rates, prices and demands for forest products, the author presents the results of linear programming solutions specifying rates of cut, industrial investment, production and imports which together provide the highest value of net discounted benefit. The analysis extends over seven future periods up to 60 years from the present. The study thus provides a valuable demonstration of a planning technique which deserves careful consideration.
185 x 250mm | 136 pages | black and white
0-11-710143-5
£1.35
Stock code:FCBU051
Bulletin
Robert J. Colenutt, Roger M. Sidaway
1973
This report is a description and assessment of research into the use of the Forest of D ean by day visitors.The central theme of the study is the prediction of recreational use. Dr R.J. Colenutt and local Forestry Commission staff carried out a survey of day visitors to the Forest of Dean during the summer of 1968, and this work formed the basis of Dr Colenutt’s doctoral thesis submitted to the University of Bristol in 1970. This work is a valuable contribution to the study of demand prediction and should assist others contemplating similar investigations. The second part of the report considers the planning implications of the study.
185 x 250mm | 72 pages | black and white
0-11-710138-9
£0.60
Stock code:FCBU046
Bulletin
W.O. Wittering (Ed)
1973
This Bulletin presents the papers produced for an international course on work study in forestry organised by the Forestry Commission for the joint FAO/ECE/ILO Committee on Forest Working Techniques and Training of Forest Workers held at Wymondham College, Norfolk, and Newton Rigg College of Agriculture and Forestry, Cumberland, in July 1971.
185 x 250mm | 120 pages | black and white
0-11-710139-7
£1.00
Stock code:FCBU047
Bulletin
J.R.Aldhous
1972
This Bulletin summarises results gained from the extensive programme of experiments and enquiries carried out by the Forestry Commission’s Research Division, from its inception in 1919 until the year 1970, together with the practical experience obtained in the large-scale raising of planting stocks for the national afforestation programme.
185 x 250mm | 224 pages | black and white
0-11-710136-2
£2.30
Stock code:FCBU043
Bulletin
C.I. Carter
1971
This investigation has been mainly confined to providing descriptions for the identification of the various winged morphs of the adelgid species occurring in Britain. Morphological keys and descriptions, together with 32 figures, are given for the determination of the 14 winged morphs of the 9 species having alatae. In addition, a key to the adult apterae of the genus Pineus is included so as to enable identification to be made of those species which do not have a winged form. Only in the cases of Adelges viridis and A. abietis gallicolae, and Pineus orientalis and P. pini sexuparae, is it still necessary to depend upon life cycle information for separation down to species. Three of the species described, A. viridana, P. pineoides and P. orientalis, have not previously been recognised in Britain. Details are given of transfer experiments carried out to check host alternation pattern in the alatae of certain species. A world check list of adelgids, their common hosts and distribution is appended.
85 x 250mm | 76 pages | black and white
0-11-710134-6
£0.75
Stock code:FCBU042
Bulletin
B.W. Holtham (Ed)
1971
A very severe westerly gale blew across central Scotland in the early hours of 15 January 1968. This report describes damage it did to forests and tells how representatives of the private woodland owners, the home timber trade and the Forestry Commission, appointed to an advisory committee called the Windblow Action Group, appraised and advised effectively on the measures necessary for surveying the damage, harvesting and marketing the windthrown timber, safeguarding forest hygiene, and restocking the forests with trees.
185 x 250mm | 72 pages | mostly black and white
0-11-880153-8
£0.45
Stock code:FCBU045
Bulletin
P.A. Wardle (Ed)
1971
At the Fourteenth Congress of the International Union of Forest Research Organisations held in Munich in September, 1967 a Working Group was set up in the Economics Section, Section 31, to consider the contribution of operational research to studies in the field of the managerial economics of forestry. In September, 1970, members of this working group met at the Research Station of the Forestry Commission, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey, England. This Bulletin contains the papers presented at that meeting and a record of the discussion.
185 x 250mm | 172 pages | black and white
0+11-710135-4
£1.55
Stock code:FCBU044
Bulletin
D.C. Nicholls
1969
This Bulletin presents the results of an enquiry by Dr. D. C. Nicholls into the factors that influence the use of land for forestry on private estates in England and Wales.
185 x 250mm | 88 pages | black and white
0-11-710133-8
Free
Stock code:FCBU039
Bulletin
A.I. Fraser, J.B.H. Gardiner
1967
The primary object of the investigations presented in this Bulletin has been to compare the tree’s ability to withstand wind forces when grown under various conditions. The only part of the root system measured is the portion which comes out of the ground when the tree is pulled over.
185 x 250mm | 56 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU040
Bulletin
B.W. Holtam, E.S.B. Chapman, R.B. Ross, M.G. Harker
1967
This Bulletin presents the findings of a team of Forestry Commission Officers who visited Sweden and Norway in 1965. The main object of the visit was to study managerial, organisational and technical practices which seemed likely to assist in promoting greater efficiency in the creation and maintenance of state and private woodlands at home and in the harvesting and transportation of wood to consumer industries.
185 x 250mm | 124 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU041
Bulletin
J.M.B. Brown, D. Bevan
1966
The insect Dendroctonus micans, a bark beetle that is found in North West Europe, has for long been held, by forest entomologists, to constitute a potential threat to coniferous plantations in Great Britain, although it is not yet established here. Accordingly, in June 1964, Mr D. Bevan, the Commission’s senior forest entomologist, and Mr J.M.B. Brown, the Commission’s forest ecologist, carried out a tour through Denmark and parts of Germany and Holland, in order to assess the degree of risk. The purpose of their tour may be expressed in the form of five questions which they had constantly before them: (A) What is the present status of Dendroctonus micans in the regions visited? (B) What environmental conditions (climatic, edaphic, biotic) are of particular significance in relation to the surge of Dendroctonus breeding in Denmark, Holland and Schleswig-Holstein in the last twenty-five years ? (C) Is there a likelihood of Dendroctonus gaining a footing in Britain ? (D) Where in Britain would it find suitable habitats, should it ever gain entry? (E) What precautions can and should be taken to lessen the probability of introduction? This Bulletin presents the results of their investigations.
185 x 250mm | 88 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU038
Bulletin
Blanche Benzian
1965
This Bulletin is an account of the nursery experimental work on nutrition carried out between 1945 and 1962 by a joint research effort between staff of the Rothamsted Experimental Station and the Research Branch of the Forestry Commission.
185 x 250mm | 284 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU037
Bulletin
Blanche Benzian
1965
This second volume of information related to experiments on nursery nutrition contains a full statement of the detailed results for each individual experiment discussed in volume 1. The detailed tabular statements are grouped into several parts: A. General, B. Seedbeds, C. Transplants, Appendix and Supplementary Tables.
185 x 250mm | 276 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU037
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1964
A summary of methods of establishing forest nurseries and plantations with advice on other forestry questions for owners, agents and foresters.
190 x 250mm | 116 pages | black and white | 8th edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
D.W. Henman
1963
Experimental pruning of conifer crops was begun by the Forestry Commission in 1931 and the results of the experiments have been assessed up to date, but the final assessment, that of the pruned timber, still lies in the future. The main purpose of this Bulletin is to indicate the extent of the experimental work done so far and to present its results; but in view of the practical interest at present being shown in the subject in Britain an appraisal is included of the aims of pruning, and the experimental results are used, as far as possible, to make provisional recommendations for forest practice. The foreign literature has been surveyed, but as it is often difficult to relate to British conditions it has been drawn on in making the recommendations only when information from home sources is inadequate. Where the British results disagree markedly with Continental experience, this is indicated.
185 x 250mm | 78 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU035
Bulletin
W.R.C. Handley
1963
Ever since its establishment in 1919, the Forestry Commission has taken an active interest in the afforestation of heathlands dominated by the common heather, Calluna vulgaris. These heaths hold a large reserve of plantable land, but are difficult areas for the good growth of most timber trees. Much research work has therefore been carried out on their problems, from several angles of approach. This bulletin presents the results of enquiries into those heathland mycorrhizal associations—that is the inter-relationships between trees, plants, and fungi, which appear to be important to the practising Forester. It summarises work done at intervals over the past sixteen years, mainly at Oxford but also at several of the Commission’s heathland forests, notably Allerston in Yorkshire and Wareham in Dorset.
185 x 250mm | 80 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU036
Bulletin
R.F. Wood, M. Nimmo
1962
In 1961 the Forestry Commission had over 30 forests situated wholly or partly on chalk formations, scattered over the southern and eastern counties from Dorset to Kent and north to Yorkshire, while private estate owners are also engaged in the planting and management of extensive stretches of chalk down woodland. In 1927 the Commission began a series of experiments into the best methods to use, and the most suitable kinds of trees to plant, on chalk downs and wolds undergoing afforestation for the first time. These trials, most of which are centred on Friston Forest, near Eastbourne in Sussex, and Queen Elizabeth Forest near Petersfield in Hampshire, have been continued ever since, and the main purpose of this Bulletin is to present the findings to date. It also includes an account of the characteristics of the chalk country, a historical review of planting practice since 1808, and a discussion of the future prospects.
185 x 250mm | 80 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU034
Bulletin
J.W.L. Zehetmayer
1960
The upland heaths considered in this Bulletin comprise wide stretches of heather-clad land among the hills along the eastern side of Scotland and Northern England.This Bulletin reviews all the experimental work carried out over a period of thirty-six years, from 1921 to 1957. Many methods tried out in the early years have long since been discarded, while others have become general practice. The object of this work is to present a complete record of all that was attempted, with an assessment of the results so far achieved.
185 x 250mm | 188 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU032
Bulletin
T.R. Peace
1960
The discovery of the disease in Britain in 1927, and its persistence here until 1959, have provided certain unique opportunities for its study. The results of this study, with certain necessary references to European and American work, are presented here.
185 x 250mm | 72 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU033
Bulletin
F.C. Hummel, G.M.L. Locke, J.N.R.Jeffers, J.M. Christie
1959
The systematic measurement of sample plots in stands of growing timber provides the data for the compilation of yield tables and other estimates of increment which are essential to the economic management of woodlands. In order that such measurements shall be strictly comparable, both as between one sample plot and another, and within the same plot as measured on different occasions, a precise method must always be followed. This bulletin sets out in detail the procedure that has been developed by the Forestry Commission’s research officers since such measurements were begun in Britain, under the Board of Agriculture, forty-five years ago. Though intended primarily for the staff engaged on such work, it is believed that it contains much information of value to all who are concerned with the raising and accurate measurement of timber trees, both at home and abroad.
185 x 250mm | 124 pages | blakc and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU031
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1958
Tree willows may be divided into two groups, according to the purpose for which the wood is to be utilised. One group contains trees which are pollarded with a view to the production of poles used principally for hurdles and rough fencing. The other group contains timber of larger size and under this category the most important manufactured product is the cricket bat. The cultivation of the willow is not actually difficult, but close attention to detail is necessary, especially during its early life. Many growers fail to realise sufficiently the requirements of the tree, and are accordingly disappointed in the product obtained. The large amount of timber of poor quality now produced is partly the result of lack of attention. This Bulletin provides detailed information and discussion on the cultivation and use of willow.
155 x 250mm | 60 pages | blak and white | 2nd edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU017
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1958
A summary of methods of establishing forest nurseries and plantations with advice on other forestry questions for owners, agents and foresters.
190 x 250mm | 104 pages | black and white | 7th edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
W.R. Day
1957
In the spring and summer of 1952 Mr W.R. Day, Lecturer in Forest Pathology at the Imperial Forestry Institute, Oxford, visited British Columbia. His object was to examine the forest relationships of the Sitka spruce in its natural homeland. The main purpose was to study Sitka spruce as an element in the mixed forests in which it naturally occurs, in relation to soil and topographical situation, and if possible in somewhat contrasting climatic regions.
185 x 250mm | 152 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU028
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1957
This Bulletin is the response of Great Britain to the request of the Commonwealth Conference to produce a report on exotic trees in the British Isles.
185 x 250mm | 198 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU030
Bulletin
J.M. Caborn
1957
This bulletin discusses the effects which shelterbelts of trees exert on the microclimates of their adjacent regions. Part one consists of a review of available scientific evidence concerning such effects and their influence on agricultural yields and forestry practice. Part two deals with a critical survey of research procedure in connexion with microclimatological investigations of shelterbelt effects. Experimental work undertaken is described in part three and discussed in relation to its practical application to shelterbelt requirements in Great Britain.
185 x 250mm | 164 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU029
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1956
This bulletin presents the results of studies carried out on the rate of growth and yield of coppices of the common hazel, and on the utilisation of hazel poles both by traditional means and by modem technical processes. As hazel occupies over 160,000 acres of woodlands in Great Britain, its proper utilisation, where this is economically feasible, is a matter of concern to owners of woodlands.
185 x 250mm | 68 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU027
Bulletin
Issac William Varty
1956
Insects of the genus Adelges have long been recognised as economically important pests of the valuable timber-producing silver fir trees that comprise the genus Abies. In fact the planting of the common European silver fir, Abies alba, has had to be greatly restricted in Britain because of the depredations of these insects. This Bulletin gives the results of Dr. Varty’s intensive studies of the Adelges insects in relation to forestry, which were carried out in Scotland under the auspices of the Department of Forestry of Aberdeen University. It replaces Bulletin No. 7 - The Silver Fir Chermes.
185 x 250mm | 104 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU026
Bulletin
C.W. Yeatman
1955
The investigation was initiated by the Forestry Commission as part of the programme of research into the afforestation of heathlands. The object of the investigation was to study the root development of coniferous forest crops on upland heaths to determine: (i) The relationships existing between the development of the root systems, the soils, and the types and intensities of cultivation prior to planting. (ii) The effects of the application of fertilisers on the vigour of the root systems. (iii) Differences occurring in the root systems of the species studied. (iv) The comparative ability of the root systems of these species to exploit the soils, both in their natural state and when cultivated. In the light of this information, and with reference to relevant studies and practice in Britain and elsewhere, desirable methods of cultivation and the selection of species for the afforestation of upland heaths are considered.
185 x 250mm | 104 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU021
Bulletin
F.C. Hummel
1955
This bulletin is a study in forest mensuration which has arisen out of investigations into the timber content of British woodlands. It deals primarily with the relationship that exists between the volume of a tree and its sectional area at breast height; a relationship here called, for convenience, the volume-basal area line. Studies of this relationship have made possible the production of general volume tables and general tariff tables, which facilitate the rapid and accurate estimation of the timber content of certain types of plantations, and are therefore of considerable practical importance to foresters working in the field.
185 x 250mm | 92 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU024
Bulletin
R.F. Wood
1955
During 1952 and 1953, Mr. R. F. Wood, one of the Commission’s forest officers, who had been awarded a Travelling Fellowship by the Nuffield Foundation, visited the forests of British Columbia and the neighbouring territories, to carry out field studies. This region is the home of several trees, such as the Sitka spruce and the Douglas fir, which have become important in British silviculture, but few comparative studies of the two environments, in relation to tree growth, had hitherto been made. The purpose of this Bulletin is to examine and discuss the growth of these timber trees, as observed in North-West America, with particular reference to its implications for forestry practice in the British Isles.
185 x 250mm | 76 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU025
Bulletin
W.R.C. Handley
1954
This bulletin presents the results of researches carried out at the Imperial Forestry Institute, Oxford, between 1948 and 1953. It deals with the processes that go on when organic material decays in the soil.
185 x 250mm | 132 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU023
Bulletin
J.W.L. Zehetmayr
1954
This Bulletin summarises the results of numerous experiments carried out in various parts of the country, experiments which have dealt, mainly, with methods of establishing crops of trees on peat.
185 x 250mm | 134 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU022
Bulletin
J. M. B. Brown
1953
This bulletin presents the results of a comprehensive survey of British beechwoods carried out by Mr J.M.B. Brown, B.Sc., during the years 1948 to 1950. The importance of the beech in our woodlands is generally realised, and it is hoped that these studies will prove of value to all concerned with its silviculture.
185 x 250mm | 136 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU020
Bulletin
T. R. Peace
1952
This Bulletin endevours to fill in the gaps in our knowledge of poplar cultivation. The choice of varieties is bewildering, and is becoming rapidly more so as new hybrids are produced. The selection of site requires considerable care, and a large number of variations on the basically simple methods of propagation and tending are practised in various countries. As well as those areas, this Bulletin also fills in the gaps and elaborates the basic information given in Forestry Commission Leaflet No. 27, Poplar Planting (Forestry Commission 1948). It may also be said to replace the previous edition of Forestry Commission Bulletin No. 5 entitled Poplars, which has long been out of date.
185 x 250mm | 82 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU019
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1946
A summary of methods of establishing forest nurseries and plantations with advice on other forestry questions for owners, agents and foresters.
190 x 250mm | 102 pages | black and white | 4th edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1946
This Bulletin provides an update to the original bulletin from 1937. Spring frosts add considerably to the difficulties of establishing young plantations. Investigations which the Imperial Forestry Institute had been carrying out for the Forestry Commission since 1929 were already yielding interesting results when the great May frosts of 1935 occurred. These frosts were so widespread and did so much damage that it was decided to study the whole subject in detail. This Bulletin deals with the problems of how to recognise frosty areas in advance of planting, and how to assess the frost-hardiness of different species of trees. Detailed attention is given to the climate of the ground air zone within which trees live and to susceptibility of forest trees to damage by spring frost. The main concern is with trees of economic importance but the lists indicating the relative frost-hardiness of numerous ornamental trees and shrubs will perhaps also be useful to gardeners and others who plant for amenity.
155 x 250mm | 130 pages | black and white | 2nd edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU018
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1937
Spring frosts add considerably to the difficulties of establishing young plantations. Investigations which the Imperial Forestry Institute had been carrying out for the Forestry Commission since 1929 were already yielding interesting results when the great May frosts of 1935 occurred. These frosts were so widespread and did so much damage that it was decided to study the whole subject in detail. This Bulletin deals with the problems of how to recognise frosty areas in advance of planting, and how to assess the frost-hardiness of different species of trees. Detailed attention is given to the climate of the ground air zone within which trees live and to susceptibility of forest trees to damage by spring frost. The main concern is with trees of economic importance but the lists indicating the relative frost-hardiness of numerous ornamental trees and shrubs will perhaps also be useful to gardeners and others who plant for amenity.
155 x 250mm | 150 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU018
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1936
Tree willows may be divided into two groups, according to the purpose for which the wood is to be utilised. One group contains trees which are pollarded with a view to the production of poles used principally for hurdles and rough fencing. The other group contains timber of larger size and under this category the most important manufactured product is the cricket bat. The cultivation of the willow is not actually difficult, but close attention to detail is necessary, especially during its early life. Many growers fail to realise sufficiently the requirements of the tree, and are accordingly disappointed in the product obtained. The large amount of timber of poor quality now produced is partly the result of lack of attention. This Bulletin provides detailed information and discussion on the cultivation and use of willow.
155 x 250mm | 72 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU017
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1936
Part 1 of this Bulletin to brings together all the manuscripts dealing with studies on the biology and forest relations of the pine shoot moth, Evetria buoliana Schiff. Further data have been collected on the distribution of the moth in East Anglia and on the results of recent experimental control studies, which are given in Part 2.
155 x 240mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU016
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1933
A summary of methods of establishing forest nurseries and plantations with advice on other forestry questions for owners and agents.
155 x 250mm | 110 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU014
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1933
This bulletin is an account of investigations conducted during a number of years by Dr. G. K. Fraser, of the Department of Forestry, Aberdeen University, into the establishment of timber crops on peat soils in Scotland and particularly under west coast conditions as illustrated at Inverliever on Loch Awe. The investigations recorded in this bulletin are intended to assist the forester in recognising the different kinds of peat in the field and to assess their probable value for afforestation and at the same time to make clear the causes which have led to the unsatisfactory soil conditions in those peat areas which have, in the past, been regarded as unplantable. One object of these investigations has therefore been to obtain information likely to be useful in indicating how the less tractable peat areas may be rendered fit for afforestation.
155 x 250mm | 116 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU015
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1932
This bulletin contains an account of investigations on the roots of young trees carried out over a series of years for the Forestry Commission by Dr. E. V. Laing of the Department of Forestry, Aberdeen University. Special attention has been paid to the association of fungi (mycorrhiza) with roots and to the development and action of roots in peat soils. Both these questions are of great importance in afforestation operations in Great Britain.
155 x 250mm | 92 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU013
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1931
The five forest gardens which form the subject of this Bulletin are Cockle Park, near Morpeth, Northumberland; Cirencester, Gloucestershire; Abbotswood, Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire; Alice Holt, Hampshire; and Ceiriog, Denbighshire. Each garden consists of a series of experimental plots laid out for purposes of study and for the comparison of the rate of growth of the different species of trees. The areas vary in size from 3 acres at Alice Holt, where there are only five plots, to 50 acres at Ceiriog, with more than fifty plots and groups.
155 x 250mm | 150 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU012
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1928
This publication is a revision of Bulletin 3, 'Rate of Growth of Conifers in the British Isles'. In this revised work the original tables for European larch, Scots pine and Norway spruce have been retained unaltered, while complete yield tables for Douglas fir and Corsican pine have been added. Further, a revised preliminary yield table for Japanese larch and a new preliminary table for Sitka spruce are given.

The methods employed during the 1917 survey were laid down in Bulletin 1 (published in November, 1919), however, for the sake of convenience, much of the information has been reproduced in Chapter II of this publication, which also includes a description of the methods employed in measuring the permanent sample plots. The section in Bulletin 3 dealing with the methods of constructing the yield tables has been revised, and diagrams included to illustrate some of the more important stages of the work. Chapters IV to VIII of Bulletin 3, which discussed the relation of some of the factors of locality to the growth of the principal species, have been abridged, but there is now included a complete list of the sample plots with relative summary data and locality descriptions.
155 x 250mm | 211 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU010
Bulletin
H. M. Steven
1928
This Bulletin discusses the importance of nursery practice and the current methods employed. Only coniferous species are dealt with; broadleaved trees occupy a relatively small area in the new plantations. The bulletin shows that important improvements can be obtained by attention to tilth conditions (largely governed by the time of sowing), by treatment of the seed before sowing, and by careful regulation of the depth and density of sowing. Losses in the seedling stage are frequently numerous, but can be reduced by efficient methods of shelter in summer and winter, as well as by control of insect and fungus pests.
155 x 240mm | 188 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU011
Bulletin
J.W. Munro
1928
This Bulletin discusses beetles which attack timber. They belong to various families of the order Coleoptera of which four groups may be recognised - longicom beetles (Cerambycidae), pin-hole borers (Scolytidae and Platypodidae), powder-post beetles (Bostrychidae and Lyctidae) and furniture beetles (Anobiidae). The objective of this bulletin is to describe the insects and the damage done and to make suggestions regarding preventive and remedial measures.
155 x 313mm | 36 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU009
Bulletin
J.W. Munro
1926
This Bulletin deals with bark-beetles, a group of insects which is closely connected with forestry practice. It is the outcome of several years' work and of first-hand study of the beetles both in the laboratory and in the field. The purpose of the Bulletin is to give an account of those bark-beetles which occur in British woodlands and to show their relation to forestry practice.
155 x 240mm | 96 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU008
Bulletin
R. Neil Chrystal
1926
This Bulletin provides information on the life-cycle of the silver fir chermes in Britain, as well as information on the relationship between the insect and its host tree, the silver fir, to ascertain how far the chermes was responsible for the death of the tree. The Bulletin also presents certain information collected by the author during a visit to Denmark, made in June, 1924, for the purpose of studying the silver fir plantations there with reference to the chermes. These results are correlated here with an account of the silver firs in Britain, based upon information currently available.
155 x 250mm | 36 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU007
Bulletin
Malcolm Wilson
1925
The fungus phomopsis pseudotsugce, which has from time to time been known under different names, has a wide distribution in Britain and also occurs on the continent of Europe. It may attack both the green and the blue Douglas firs, the European and Japanese larches and abies grandis among the silver firs. It is possible that other conifers may be subject to the same disease. This Bulletin gives a detailed technical account of the disease.
155 x 250mm | 46 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU006
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1923
The procedure to be followed in cultivating poplars differs in some respects from that adopted in the case of other species, and necessarily varies somewhat according to local circumstances. In this bulletin an attempt is made to indicate which kinds of poplar it is advisable to cultivate and how they should be planted and treated with a view to the economic production of timber.
155 x 230mm | 63 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU005
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1922
This bulletin embodies the results of an investigation into the life history of Chermes (Gillettea) cooleyi Gillette, an American species of the family Chermesidae, which has made its appearance upon the Douglas fir in this country. The insect Chermes cooleyi lives partly on the Douglas fir and partly on the Sitka spruce. It is not altogether new to Great Britain, having been observed in the New Forest on Douglas fir in 1913, but reports received in 1919 showed that it was more widely distributed than had been suspected and was apparently spreading.
155 x 250mm | 58 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU004
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1920
A survey for the collection of statistics as to the rate of growth and production of timber was begun in the summer of 1917, at a time when the large demands for timber required for military purposes and the mining industry were being met mainly from British woods. Extensive fellings were in progress in all parts of the country, and negotiations were proceeding on all sides for the sale of standing timber. These abnormal conditions offered a unique opportunity for the collection of forest statistics.

The first three Chapters of the bulletin deal with the general methods employed in the field and the working up of the collected data into Yield Tables for the principal species. In order to confine the bulletin within reasonable limits, the methods by which the Yield Tables were prepared have not been described in detail. In Chapters IV to VIII, the data are submitted to statistical analysis with a view to investigating the effect of locality upon the growth of Larch, Scots pine and Spruce. Finally, in Chapter IX, the evidence from the data as to the prevalence of canker in Larch, crown damage in Scots pine and heartrot in Larch, Scots pine, and Spruce is briefly discussed.
155 x 250mm | 102 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU003
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1920
A survey was started in May 1919, by the Interim Forest Authority, to ascertain the forest insect conditions in the British Isles, with special reference to felled areas and recently formed plantations. The main object of the survey was to determine the location, extent, and nature of the chief forest insect outbreaks and to decide what control measures were likely to prove most useful against them. The survey was concluded in September, 1919.
155 x 250mm | 40 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU002
Bulletin
Forestry Commission
1919
This Bulletin discusses the procedure to follow to undertake an assessment of the silvicultural possibilities of the woodlands and uncultivated lands in Britain. Two factors involved in any such assessment: (a) The quantity of timber, and (b) The quality of timber produced, under given conditions. This Bulletin deals chiefly with the quantity of timber produced.
155 x 250mm | 18 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBU001
Management handbook
R.W. Matthews, T.A.R. Jenkins, E.D. Mackie, E.C. Dick
2016
Yield models are one of the foundations of forest management. They provide information about the patterns of tree growth and potential productivity that can be expected in forest stands of different tree species, with varying growth rates, when managed in different ways. Yield models are in daily use by forest managers and practitioners when making decisions about the future management of a forest – whether it is an individual stand of trees or a whole estate. They are also applied when forecasting future levels of production, when making commitments to supply timber markets, and for planning and scheduling forest operations. The outputs of yield models support many other calculations and models relevant to the evaluation of forests and forestry. These include analyses of the development of forest structure at the stand and landscape scales, the modelling of timber and wood properties, the estimation of forest biomass and carbon stocks, the modelling of forest greenhouse gas balances and the economic evaluation of forest policies and forest management options. This handbook is designed for those who would like to know more about the theory underpinning yield modelling. It will be of use to forest and woodland managers and practitioners, researchers and students.

The Forest Yield software is available from: www.forestry.gov.uk/forestyield

A5 | 96 pages | colour
978-0-85538-942-0
£19.00
Stock code:FCBK048
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2016
Pine processionary moth is a serious pest of pine trees in southern Europe. The moth larvae (caterpillars) feed on pine needles and defoliate trees, which reduces tree growth and timber production. Large numbers of larvae can cause severe damage – weakening the trees sufficiently to make them vulnerable to other pests and diseases and, in some cases, leading to tree death. Since the 1990s the moth has been expanding its distribution in Europe and it can now be found breeding as far north as Paris in France. Although not present in the UK, the favourable climate and presence of suitable host trees in the south of Britain suggests that the pine processionary moth might be able to establish breeding populations in southern parts of England.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-939-0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PPM
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2016
Chestnut blight is a serious disease of chestnut trees caused by the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica. The fungus does little damage to host trees in its native range in Asia, but has devastated American chestnut when it was accidentally introduced to the USA more than 100 years ago via infected planting stock. The disease was introduced into Europe in the 1930s where it affects species such as the European or ‘sweet’ chestnut. It has since spread to most parts of the continent, causing serious damage in orchards and forests. Chestnut blight was detected for the first time in Britain in 2011 on planted imported trees, but is now considered eradicated. However, annual surveys and vigilence are needed to ensure that the UK remains free of the disease.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-943-7
Free
Stock code:FCPH-CB
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Plant Health controls apply to a wide range of wood products, including woodchip. These controls are in place to prevent the spread of pests and pathogens that would be ecologically and economically damaging if introduced to Great Britain (GB). Import regulations are tree species specific, and may vary according to the country of origin and by the type of wood or wood product imported. This note explains the current rules for regulated woodchip entering GB and covers imports from countries outside the European Union (EU), as well as consignments originating in other EU member States.
A4 | colour | 6 pages | online only
978-0-85538-937-6
Free
Stock code:FCPH006
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Plant Health controls apply to a wide range of wood products, including firewood. These controls are in place to prevent the spread of pests and pathogens that would be ecologically and economically damaging if introduced to Great Britain (GB). Import controls are tree species specific, and may vary according to the country of origin and by the type of wood or wood product imported. This note explains the current rules for regulated firewood (including kindling) entering GB, and covers imports from countries outside the European Union (EU), as well as consignments originating in other EU member States.
A4 | colour | 7 pages | online only
978-0-85538-936-9
Free
Stock code:FCPH005
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Pests and diseases can be carried on plants and trees, seeds, wood and wood products including wooden packaging material and isolated bark. They may also be carried on vehicles and machinery where they have not been properly cleaned and are carrying soil or plant debris. If you intend to export such material out of Great Britain to countries outside the EU you must comply with the importing country’s plant health regulations. The controls may require physical action by the exporter, such as removing plant debris from used forestry or agricultural machinery, or official inspection and certification. The information contained in this Guide details the application for phytosanitary certification procedures operated by the Forestry Commission.
A4 | colour | 7 pages | online only
978-0-85538-935-2
Free
Stock code:FCPH003
Plant Health 007
Forestry Commission
2015
This revised Guide sets out the obligations which apply to port authorities and others responsible for the points of entry in Great Britain where controlled wood, wood products or other goods which are accompanied by wooden packaging are landed. The Guide gives advice on the facilities needed, not only to meet the requirements of the Order, but also those which are necessary to enable inspectors to perform their work. These facilities include ones which allow the appropriate action to be taken when consignments do not meet the landing requirements prescribed in the Order and steps to prevent the introduction or spread of pests become necessary.
A4 | colour | 3 pages | online only
978-0-85538-719-X
Free
Stock code:FCPH007
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Plane wilt, also known as canker stain disease, is a serious disorder of plane trees, which are important amenity trees in the parks and avenues of many European cities. The disease is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis platani, which is present in the USA and Europe, but considered to be indigenous only to North America. It is thought to have been introduced into Europe in the Naples area of southern Italy during World War II, possibly arriving in infected wood from the USA used to package military supplies. Since then plane wilt has gradually spread to other European countries. In 2014 the UK became a Protected Zone to provide extra safeguards against accidental introduction of this disease on imported trees or the wood of plane.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-934-5
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PW
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Xylella fastidiosa is a disease causing bacterium that affects a wide range of important woody plants and broadleaved trees. It invades the xylem vessels that transport water throughout plants and causes symptoms that range from leaf scorch to tree dieback and death. In the natural environment it is transmitted by xylem-fluid feeding insects such as leafhoppers. Until recently the bacterium was only known in the Americas and Taiwan, but an outbreak on olive trees in southern Italy was confirmed in 2013. Affected shrubs were also found in France in 2015. In Italy, the bacterium is apparently causing the rapid decline of olive trees over a large area and is under emergency measures. It has not yet been found in the UK and measures are in place to protect our trees.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-933-8
Free
Stock code:FCPH-XF
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2015
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission in England will increase the value of England’s woods and forests, now and for generations to come.
A4 | 32 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2015
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission will deliver its cross border functions.
A4 | 20 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Phytophthora austrocedrae is an aggressive, fungal-like pathogen that poses a serious threat to juniper trees in Britain. Juniper is an important native species and a significant proportion of the small area of juniper woodland in Britain is protected. Phytophthora austrocedrae was first reported in the UK in 2011 and infected trees have now been found at sites across Scotland and the north of England. The pathogen primarily attacks the roots of juniper trees, killing phloem and forming lesions which extend up into the lower stem. Eventually the tree will be killed by girdling of the main stem. Phytophthora austrocedrae is a
notifiable disease and all suspected cases should be reported to the plant health authorities.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-915-4
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PA
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2014
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission will deliver its cross border functions.
A4 | 20 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
2014
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission will rise to new challenges and seize fresh opportunities over the coming year in protecting, improving and expanding the nation’s woodlands.
A4 | 32 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Elm yellows is a disease of elm trees caused by a type of bacterium known as a phytoplasma. Symptoms of the disease can range from yellowing of leaves to dieback of foliage and branches. Elm yellows has been found affecting elm trees in North America and a few European countries, but in 2014 it was detected in the UK for the first time on imported material being propagated at a nursery in England. It is important that any further suspected cases of the disease are reported, so that infected saplings are not planted in the wider environment giving the phytoplasma the chance to spread. Elm yellows can affect healthy elm trees that are resistant to other serious conditions such as Dutch elm disease.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-906-2
Free
Stock code:FCPH-EY
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Phytophthora lateralis is an aggressive, fungallike pathogen of Lawson cypress trees. It mainly attacks the roots of trees and can spread up through the trunk resulting in the rapid decline and death of the tree. Thought to originate in Asia, the disease is the main cause of mortality in Lawson cypress in its native range in the west coast of North America, and outbreaks have now been recorded in France and the Netherlands. The pathogen was first reported in the UK in 2010, most likely having been imported from mainland Europe, and it has since been found on sites across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is important that suspected cases of the disease are reported.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-901-7
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PL
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission (England)
2013
A new woodland culture: trees for the good of our economy, people and the environment.
A4 | 28 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2013
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission will deliver its cross border functions.
A4 | 20 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2013
Ash dieback is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees and it may lead to tree death. This Pest Alert provides information on distribution, symptoms, how the disease spreads and what you can do to help, as well as some brief information on other disorders of ash trees.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-ADD
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2013
The Asian longhorn beetle, a native to China and southeast Asia, is an invasive pest of trees in Britain. The larvae of the beetle feed on the wood of a wide range of broadleaved trees, which causes damage and will ultimately kill affected trees. The beetle has caused extensive damage to trees where it has been accidentally introduced in recent years – for example in the USA and Italy. Until recently the only evidence of the beetle in Britain was within imported wood packaging intercepted by Plant Health inspectors. However, a breeding population was found in Kent in 2012 – most likely introduced via wooden crates containing imported stone. The beetle is subject to regulation and movement controls are in place; it is important that all suspected sightings are reported.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-882-9
Free
Stock code:FCPH-ALB

Biosecurity - good working practice for those involved in forestry

Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2012
The Forestry Commission has produced guidance on biosecurity measures and good working practice for the forestry sector. This guidance is for anyone who works for, or carries out official duties on behalf of, the Forestry Commission. The booklet details practical steps designed to minimise the risk of introducing or spreading pests and diseases. It includes a decision tree which can be used to plan the level of biosecurity needed in a particular situation, and a table which shows the biosecurity measures to use for low-risk and high-risk activities.

The guidance, and additional information, is available on our biosecurity web pages.

85 x 54mm fold-out (Zcard) | colour
978-0-85538-869-0
Free
Stock code:FCMS028
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2012
This Corporate Plan discusses how Forestry Commission England are protecting, improving and expanding England’s woodlands to increase their value to society, the environment and the economy.
A4 | 28 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2012
This Corporate Plan commits the Forestry Commission, through its GB work, to ensure that the nation’s trees and woodlands contribute to a sustainable green economy. In addition, the plan will support delivery of three of Defra’s Structural Reform priorities.
A4| 19 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2011
This leaflet sets out the obligations of manufacturers, repairers, recyclers and others involved in the wood packaging material sector under the United Kingdom Wood Packaging Material Marking Programme.
A4 | 12 pages | online only
978-0-85538-854-6
Free
Stock code:FCPH004
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2011
This booklet explains which imports of wood, wood products and bark are subject to chargeable import inspection, how much the fees are, and how they may be paid.

A credit application form for import business is available to download here as pdf file:
Credit application form
A4 | 11 pages | online only
978-0-85538-856-0
Free
Stock code:FCPH002
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission (England)
2011
A4 | 23 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2011
A4 | 16 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Management handbook
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
This guidance note provides an introduction to the restoration and management of ancient wood pastures in Scotland. It is aimed at land managers, their advisers and agency staff involved in land management and grant assessment. It has also been developed to help applicants to the Scottish Rural Development Programme
deliver the ‘Management of Ancient Wood Pasture’ Option.
PDF only
None
Free
Stock code:FCFC154

Managing Native Broadleaved Woodland

Management handbook
Ralph Harmer, Gary Kerr, Richard Thompson
2010

Native woodlands occupy an important place in both our countryside and cultural heritage. They are managed to provide timber and other wood products but nowadays are often equally valued as habitats for wildlife and areas for recreation. The aim of this handbook is to provide advice that will help owners and managers understand and manage native broadleaved woodlands. A wide variety of subjects are covered, from identifying woodland communities and management planning, to silvicultural techniques, nature conservation and vegetation management – including the use of grazing animals. The background and principles of each topic are explained and case studies are used throughout. Interactions between site characteristics and historic management are also considered in relation to future management options. The handbook also highlights the questions that managers should ask, when considering management options for their woodlands, that take account of location, site characteristics and objectives.

Please note this publication is only available to buy from TSO
T: +44 (0)870 600 5522
W: www.tsoshop.co.uk

B5 book | 510 pages | colour
978-0-11-497344-5
£30
Stock code:FCBK003
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2010
This Corporate Plan sets out how the Forestry Commission will improve how it works to ensure that it is an efficient, effective and sustainable organisation.
A4 | 31 pages | olour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2010
This Corporate Plan sets out clearly how Forestry Commission England will help to deliver a number of the Government’s public service agreements while also adapting to a new and challenging operating environment.
A4 | 44 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2009
The pine-tree lappet moth has caused severe defoliation of Scots pine trees on many occasions in Eastern Europe. An initial assessment of the potential impact of the moth in Britain is that it presents a significant threat to the pine forests of northeast Scotland – and further afield if allowed to spread. This Pest Alert provides information on the level of threat of the moth, status and controls and what to look for to identify it.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PTL
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2009
This Corporate Plan sets out the Forestry Commission’s programme of work for its activities across Great Britain and the strategic direction that the Forestry Commission will take up to 2012.
A4 | 30 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2009
This Corporate Plan sets out clearly how Forestry Commission England will help deliver a number of the Government’s public service agreements.
A4 | 53 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2008
This Corporate Plan sets out clearly how Forestry Commission England will help deliver the Government’s public service agreements on: mitigating dangerous climate change; securing a healthy natural environment; and improving quality of life.
A4 | 52 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Corporate Plan
Forestry Commission
2008
This Corporate Plan sets out the programme agreed with the Forestry Commission for those activities it carries out across Great Britain. It also describes the strategic direction that the Forestry Commission will take up to 2011, and how their activities
contribute to a number of Government agendas.
A4 | 25 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCCoP
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2006
This Note sets out the risks to forestry in Great Britain from imported pests and diseases which could be distributed through the use of wood dunnage retaining bark. It also sets out the obligations to minimise that risk which apply to port authorities and others in charge of terminals, defined for this purpose as any facility through which goods are imported and exported.
A4 | 2 pages | online only
0855387203
Free
Stock code:FCPH111

Forest mensuration: a handbook for practitioners

Management handbook
Forestry Commission
2006
Forest Mensuration is an essential, practice-based handbook designed to help all those working in the timber trade and forestry understand how to measure trees and timber. Written for practitioners, researchers and students, this new edition aims to cut through some of the complexities of forest mensuration by providing a logical format and additional advice to help readers find the information they need more easily. A key to measurement procedures at the start of the book guides readers towards selecting appropriate methods of measurement. The Handbook includes a comprehensive set of charts, tables and equations alongside step-by-step guidance to help readers in applying procedures which currently represent best practice in British forestry.
Book | 330 pages | 2-colour
0855386215
£24.00
Stock code:FCBK039

Managing the pinewoods of Scotland

Management handbook
W L Mason
2004
Our native pinewoods have long been treasured for their landscape and cultural values, as well as their contribution to the economy through timber production and recreational activities. Following decades of exploitation and degradation, recent management has concentrated primarily on the conservation of what remained of these ancient semi-natural woodlands. The aims of this handbook are to promote the maintenance and expansion of our existing native pinewoods, encourage the integration with plantations within the pinewood zone, and support the creation of new native pinewoods.
Book | 234 pages | full colour
0855386371
£25.00
Stock code:FCBK002

The silviculture and management of coppice woodlands

Management handbook
Ralph Harmer
2003
Coppice woodlands form an important part of our cultural heritage and are often valuable areas for conservation and biodiversity. The 20th century saw a marked decline in coppice but in recent years long neglected woodlands have been brought back into active management. This renewed interest has been mainly for wildlife benefits, but some well-managed crops, especially in-cycle coppice, can have commercial value. Although coppicing is a simple process the results achieved may be disappointing. This may be due to a variety of reasons such as the size and age of stool, management of overstorey trees and the damaging effects of browsing. The aim of this book is to give information and advice on the management of trees, stools and woodlands as coppice, which is necessary if coppice woodlands are to continue to produce marketable crops and the variety of conservation, amenity and landscape objectives in which managers are interested.
Book | 88 pages | full colour
085538591X
£12.00
Stock code:FCBK001
Journal
Forestry Commission
1968-69
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-sixth Journal includes information on: International course on construction and operation of cable cranes, Aeschi, Berne, Switzerland. 17 June—6 July, 1968; Tractor skidding course—Sonsterud Forest Worker’s Training School, Gjesasen, Norway; Some notes on Swedish forestry, July 1968; Report of visit to tree breeding establishments in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, June and July 1969; Microbiological activity in soils and its influence on the availability of major nutrients to plants; Progress of research in plant nutrition on peat; The future of forest nurseries in Northern Ireland; Fertilisers in forestry— the future; Jervaulx forest—Sitka spruce planting at 9 ft. x 9 ft. in 1943; Helicopter spraying to kill overhead cover at Lavenham forest; Paperpot technique for raising forest tree seedlings; Aerial fertilisation at Wark forest, Northumberland; Preparations for tree planting on peatland in Northern Ireland; A new approach to the fertilising of peat areas; Forestry and landscape design; The beginnings of provenance studies; The road ahead is sylvan-lined; Research conference—October 1967. Papers presented on the theme “Where are we going?”; Teaching note on the distribution of trees in Britain; Green spaces and air pollution; Snow storm in Delamere forest; Bird life of the border forests; Awards of the Balfour-Brown deer trophies for 1968 and 1969; Access and sport; Management for conservation; Shepherds on wheels; Grizedale forest handicrafts; Studies on light, frame-steering tractors; A cheap and useful timber scribe; Notes on terms used in the pulp, paper and board industries; Sales contracts for standing coniferous timber from Forestry Commission areas, March 1969; Some chips from the old block; Forest utilisation; Wood and the homemaker; A reminiscence from George B. Ryle; With nature in the month of May; The basic precautions for mountain safety; Centenary of the Cutty Sark; Mike Smites: Trips that pass out of sight; Orienteering; Poetry.

155 x 245mm | 248 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO036
Journal
Forestry Commission
1966-67
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-fifth Journal includes information on: Royal Forestry Society—summer meeting in North Wales, 8th-13th May, 1966; Royal Scottish Forestry Society 69th annual excursion to North East Scotland, 16th-20th May, 1966; Post-graduate studies and fellowship, Canada and the U.S.A. 1964-65; Expedition to the Guyana rainforest; Scots pine: Report of a technical discussion at annual excursion of the Society of Foresters of Great Britain, Inverness, Thursday 24th September, 1959; The native pinewoods and their management; The formation of Scots pine plantations with particular reference to seed provenance; Management of Scots pine plantations; The utilization of Scots pine; The story of the Christmas tree; The evolution of the theory and practice in the management of a forest nursery; Aerial fertilization at Kilmory forest; Development of chemical weeding on Ministry of Defence woodlands, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire; The cultivation of felled woodland; Microbiological activity in soils and its influence on the availability of major nutrients to plants; Problems of peatland afforestation in Ireland; Nutrient status of boglands and their microbiology with regard to afforestation; Tariffing of thinnings; Problems and rewards in processing and storing seed; A Mesolithic chipping-floor in the Rhondda forest; Historical account of the forests of Argyll; Historical account of the woodlands of Ross and Cromarty; Notes on the history of Blairadam forest, Fife; Savernake: History of the forest; Alice Holt Lodge; Guns, from the farm safety leaflet of the Ministry of Agriculture; Public recreation in Forestry Commission areas in North West England; Wildlife and the forester; Improvement of spawning streams for brown trout; Pine martens, notes from conservancies; The latest Elsan, a lavatory suitable for our forests; The management of woodland nature reserves; Hill sheep; The Strathoykel plan; Scottish pulp and paper mills, an achievement of historic importance; The success story of forestry, major role in Fort William project; Workington— Britain’s first fully integrated pulp and board mill; Home grown timbers: larch; A cheaply built drier; Average price for each country: coniferous timber sold standing; Some aspects of labour relations; Forest workers’ diet; Trees on tip will be a memorial; A ride with Ianto; The Loch Ness Monster; Poetry; Book reviews.

155 x 245mm | 224 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO035
Journal
Forestry Commission
1965
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-fourth Journal includes information on: A tour of Finnish forests; Notes on the Sixth F.A.O. Study Tour—Rumania. 6th—17th June, 1965; Report on four weeks’ visit to Hannoversch— Miinden Seed Testing Station, West Germany, 31st May to 25th June, 1965; The Czech Forestry and Game Management Research Institute;Tree pruning: International Labour Office course at Arnhem, Holland; A working visit to Germany;Society of Foresters’ annual excursion, Northern Ireland, September, 1965; Royal Forestry Society—Northern Ireland excursion. 9th to 14th May, 1965; Report on Royal Forestry Society’s tour of Northern Ireland, 9th to 14th May, 1965; Royal Scottish Forestry Society. 68th annual excursion to West Scotland, 1965 held from 10th May to 14th May; 68th annual meeting and excursion of the Royal Scottish Forestry Society; Conifers in Alaska; Soil reaction and tree seedling growth; Machine lining out. The super prefer transplanter; The Delamere wire netting roller; More notes on nursery undercutting; A technique for preparation of peat moss for planting; Soil preparation and tree growth on heathland soils: The rigg and furr system; Can glass and metal containers start forest fires?; Northern Ireland forest fire statistics for forest years 1962-65; Forest protection and wildlife conservation (mammals and birds); A big stag from Thetford; The Thetford high seat; Forestry, fishing and finance; Some problems on fishery improvement on small streams; Protection forest for fishery in Japan; Wildlife studies: Black grouse, ptarmigan, golden eagles and roe deer; Gone west with the rabbits; Sap sucking by the greater spotted woodpecker in the Forest of Dean; The Forestry Commission builds 200 miles of road a year; The Abreshwiller Forest tramway; When the balloon goes up; Markets for poplar timber and bark; The psychological image of wood; Plywood, fibreboard and wood chipboard; The preservation of western red cedar shingles; Rings per inch in conifers; Land use policy; Private woodlands and national forests in the eleven Forestry Commission Conservancies, 1965; Work study in forestry; Accidents in forestry work in the Netherlands; Acid peats and associated vegetation types; The origin of hill and dale; A salute to Dr. William Schlich, forestry pioneer; A history of Kentish Woodlands; History of forest officers in East England, 1921 to 1965;The oak tree in Dean Forest history; Oak in the Dean Forest, Gloucestershire: Records of growth from 1784 to 1884; Bog butter: another explanation; Public response to forest recreation in Northern Ireland; Abbott’s Wood pond; Poetry; Book reviews.

155 x 245mm | 00 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO034
Journal
Forestry Commission
1964
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-third Journal includes information on: Rumania visit 22nd Sept. to 30th Sept., 1964; Sweden. Diary of a week’s visit, 9th Aug. to 14th Aug.; In Norwegian forests; An assessment of the cultivation value of exotic conifers in Vestland and their place in the future forestry arrangements of the area; Two weeks in Alsace. A visit to the forests of the Vosges; A report on a visit to the Queen Charlotte Islands, March, 1931; Notes on the Sitka spruce and other conifers in the Queen Charlotte Islands; Sitka spruce, Alaska’s new state tree; Royal Scottish Forestry Society. 67th annual excursion to North Scotland, 18th May to 22nd May, 1964; The Royal Forestry Society of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Summer meeting at Exmouth, 4th May to 8th May, 1964; Practical hints on excursions; The evolution of forest management in Hertfordshire; The forestry exhibition; The Scottish Game Fair, 1964; A visit to the Scottish Game Fair, 1964; Why some trees grow faster in Aberystwyth; Tree breeding for timber quality; Undercutting as a nursery technique; Rhododendron clearance at Dark Wood, Garelochhead Forest, West Scotland; The distribution of wind-borne salt of marine origin in some western areas of Wales; Predators and forestry; The shooting match; Observations on the winter roosting of starlings at Slebech Forest, Pembrokeshire; Fishery development in our forests; Work study and management in the forest; Road and extraction planning; Some notes on setting out roads; A simple unloading ramp for pitwood lorries; A plough with a promise; The Norwegian planting spade; A serviceable fire beater stand; Forests attract tourists; A note on wooden ladders; Prevention of accidents in timber production, timber haulage and other forestry work in Austria; Prevention of accidents with machinery in Austria; Basic course on fire protection, Northerwood House; The Administrative Staff College, Henley-on-Thames; The Dean Forester Training School, 1904— 1964; Kielder County Primary School; Annual Report, Bentwood Forest; Our ambassador; Our man in Ruskich; Poem: Forest fire; But whit’s a muir?; Strings O’ hemp; A review of “Expedition Guide” (Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme); Poem: Forest symphony; Solution to last year’s forestry crossword; Two forestry crosswords.

155 x 245mm | 278 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO033
Journal
Forestry Commission
1963
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-second Journal includes information on: National forests and parks; Britain’s forests in 1970; F.A.O. Silvicultural Study Tour, 14th-23rd May, 1963; Royal Scottish Forestry Society: 66th annual excursion—The Borders; Tree planting on the Island of Lewis; Royal Forestry Society of England, Wales and Northern Ireland summer meeting at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, May, 1963; Forestry possibilities in Wales. (Reprinted from The Welsh Outlook, February, 1918 by W. Craven Llewelyn); The forests of Glamorgan; Impressions of forest management in Upper Bavaria; A forester’s first impressions of Denmark; The choice of species; Pinus contorta in Ireland; Lodgepole pine in Ulster; The use and misuse of Sitka spruce; Two kinds of copper beech (translated extract from Mitteilungen der Deutschen Dendrologischen Gesellschaft of a paper by G. Kriissman); A nursery bonus scheme; The use of hop manure in nurseries; The “Rose” six-drill seed sower; Planting in straight lines; Replanting felled conifer areas, including windblow; The season of planting; Planting methods for peat afforestation; Protection of poplar from deer in Wyre forest; A French approach to the improvement of woodlands by enrichment; Air pollution in forestry; Recovery from die-back in larch; Methods of counting roe deer; Mid-Galloway area fire plan; Safety and survival measures in forest fires; Accidentally done on purpose; Power saw safety rules in America; A guide to home-grown timbers; The Forest Products Research Laboratory/Forestry Commission, Home-Grown Timber Research Committee: a review of the first five years’ work; Built of wood; A home-grown timber house; The log cabin of Hendre D du; Reconstruction of Kielder Repair Depot; List of ships launched at Bucklers Hard 1745-1812; Why train delays?; “Pardon me but your slip is showing” or “Leaves from an auditor’s notebook”; Fisherman’s luck; The innocent in Paris; Forestry crossword puzzle; Poems: the aftermath; Y Goedwig W ladol (The state forest); To a worn-out R.L.R. plough discarded at Lightmoor in the Forest of Dean; The Cambio Debarker, a work study assesment; The Cambio Debarker, an engineer’s viewpoint; Cage trap for hares; Winter 1963 at Dartmoor Forest.

155 x 245mm | 242 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO032
Journal
Forestry Commission
1961
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirtieth Journal includes information on: A farewell note from Sir Arthur Gosling; The history of box in the county of Hertfordshire; My four chestnuts; Land use for forestry and agriculture; Royal Scottish Forestry Society: 64th Annual Excursion: Deeside, May 1961; Royal Forestry Society of England and Wales: Summer meeting at Keswick, May 1961; Forest mechanisation course of the Netherlands Land Development and Reclamation Society, Arnhem, July 1961; The wild pines of Kielder Forest— are they truly native?; Timber buildings for Britain; Rogate nursery; Plant supply and the nursery forester; Damage to young plantations by the bank vole at Bernwood Forest, 1958-1960; Marking trees: Comparison of methods; Helicopter lift of fencing material, Ennerdale Forest, October 1961; Metalling of forest roads at Lyminge Forest; One application of crown thinning in sitka spruce; Hardwood pulpwood production: An application of the general tariff tables; The Royal Engineer field level; Housing the forester in North Wales; Report on visit of extraction consultants from Norway and Sweden to Forestry Commission forests, May 8th-16th, 1961; Extraction tracks; The deer of the New Forest and their control.

155 x 245mm | 152 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO030
Journal
Forestry Commission
1960
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-nineth Journal includes information on: Tours on the West Coast of North America, Fifth World Forestry Congress; The lake states tour of the Fifth World Forestry Congress; F.A.O. Study tour in South-East England; The treatment of hardwood scrub; Treatment of degraded hardwood areas for shelterwood restocking; Forestry in the Dumfries District; Estate woodlands around Cheltenham; A day in north Holland; Overseas visitors; Temperatures at the soil surface; Sharp’s lining out plough; The cultivation of felled woodland and compacted chalk; Helicopter spraying to kill whins at Speymouth forest; Brashing cost; Planning the countryside; Operator training; Happy returns; So you want more money!; Some random recollections; The mystery of the wooden box; Legends of Savile Row; Life of a forester; A Breton sculptor; Notes from here and there.

155 x 245mm | 140 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO029
Journal
Forestry Commission
1959
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-eighth Journal includes information on: Cartoon: weight lifting or axemanship; Notes on a visit to Bulgarian forests; Royal Forestry Society: Swiss tour; Excursion to Switzerland and Southern Germany; Report on a tour to study effects of mechanisation on silviculture in Germany; Report on Royal Scottish Forestry Society excursion to Argyll; A visit to Glen Affric and Guisachan forests; A discussion on Scots pine; Our native Scots pine; A visit to a forest tree breeding station in East Germany; Electrical weed contro; One-man lining-out board; Afforestation on the chalk wolds of East Riding of Yorkshire; Afforestation of a former opencast coal site in Coed Morgannwg; Course on management and methods, Klagstorp, Sweden; Report on the international training course on mechanised forest operations held in Sweden; Report on a general course on rationalisation in forestry at Arnhem in Holland; The one-man power saw—use and maintenance; Extraction of forest produce by cableway in Italy and Switzerland; Home-grown timber and the building trade; A visit to the Olympia Building exhibition, 1959; The Thetford fire plan; Crow about railway fires; Oh forester! Where is thy bed?; Landslide damage to plantation at Moccas, Herefordshire; Scots pine defoliation on the West Coast; Damage to young beech by the common rat; The fascination of badger watching; A visit to Ordnance Survey record room and museum; Valuing young plantations; Notable Arboreta measured since 1950.

155 x 245mm | 282 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO028
Journal
Forestry Commission
1958
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-seventh Journal includes information on: Fire cartoon; A visit to Canada; Alice Holt Lodge and forest; Notes on new acquisitions: England: Miterdale, Cambs., Wolscy Park, Staffs. Scotland: Glen Etive and Barrs; Rannoch Barracks; Dali; The permanent seed identification code; The treatment of the less familiar broadleaved tree seeds; Undercutting of conifer seedlings; Afforestation of open-cast coal workings at Aberpergwm. Coed Morgannwg; Foel Fynyddau. A mountain sterilised by old copper works; The development of radio communications in the Forestry Commission; Water dams for fire fighting; Wild goats at Abergynolwyn, Dovey Forest; Observations on vole attacks at Challock and Lyminge Forests in East Kent; The training of badgers at Pershore Forest; The felling of thinnings; Report on the forest workers’ course at Laubau in Bavaria; Forest worker’s course at the Forest Labour School, Arnhem, Holland; Maintenance of Jo-bu saw chains; Book review: Sandvik forestry saws; A new quarter-girth tape; Short shaft axes; Long handled felling tongs; Log refreshment chalet at Symonds Yat Rock; A creosoted sliding gate; Dwelling house made from thinnings timber; Timber conversion; First aid in agriculture; Safety hints for circular saws; Home grown softwood in London Docks; Divider as a measuring device in the field in forestry; Economics in forestry; Working plan for Tentsmuir, Fife; Measurement of periodic increment of young conifer trees; Bibliography on Windblow; Bibliography of Effect of Sea Spray on Trees and Seaside Tree Planting; Telling the forestry story; Let us see it in print; List of finds from Staple Howe, Scardale Forest, sent to the British Museum; Fire tower at Emery Down, New Forest; Postscript to the Scottish Woodlands Census, 1947-49; Christmas tree cartoon.

155 x 245mm | 202 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO027
Journal
Forestry Commission
1957
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-sixth Journal includes information on: Forestry, agriculture, and marginal land; Notes on the Seventh British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, 1957; Australia and New Zealand; A tour of Tasmania and North Auckland; A year with American foresters; A visit to Russia; In the forests of the Caucasus; A Visit to German Forests; Gibraltar; Forestry in Great Britain: a review; Forestry in Ayrshire; Notes on Whittingehame; Crarae forest garden; The tree and garden books at Gravetye Manor; Tallest and largest specimens of common trees recorded since 1947; Newborough forest, Anglesey; Advice on choice and treatment of forest tree seed; A key to 21 sorts of conifer seed; A review of nursery research: 1952-56; The benefit of lath covers for protection against frost; A review of research branch trial plantations; Trials of a disc plough on upland heaths; Some principles of combustion and their significance in forest fire behaviour; An experiment to conserve water used by a Landrover fitted with a Langdon pump for fire fighting; Supply points for knapsack sprayers; A vision of F.Y.85, or fire protection fantasy; Vole damage, 1956-57; The natural and artificial control of vertebrate pests of agriculture; The wood-pigeon problem; Winter roosting of starlings at Halvana, Wilsey Down Forest; Mechanical engineering in forestry operations; Waterways for culverts in border forest areas; Impressions of forest work in Sweden; Norwegian ideas on forest working techniques; Report on Sonsterrud forest workers course, Norway; A discussion on tool maintenance instruction courses; Forest worker instruction; Some notes on timber felling; Heavy timber felling; Transport of pit props by sea; Grading of sawn British softwoods; New hardboard plant opened; Good fuel; The soil survey of Scotland; Forestry in relation to landscape; Forestry from the town planner’s angle; The woodlands of Sussex; British Bryological Society field excursion, Barnstaple; Excavations at Staple Howe, Scardale Forest; Book review: Timbers used in the musical instruments industry; Mathematika.

155 x 245mm | 302 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO026
Journal
Forestry Commission
1956
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-fifth Journal includes information on: A forestry visit to Russia; Bison in Poland, polish cultural institute; The care and use of cross-cut saws; The Mid-Wales survey; Planting forests in Wales The Chilterns project; History of Ratagan Forest; Historial notes on the forests of Alice Holt and Woolmer; Four Cornish forests; The Crarae forest garden; A working plan for policy woodlands; Lake Vyrnwy forest, Montgomeryshire; Reay Forest, Sutherland; Notes on the British Association meeting at Sheffield—September, 1956 Three new nature reserves; Sunbiggin tarn and moor; A visit to Coniston Old Man; The collection of cones from tall trees; Ledmore nursery; Notes on farm implements used in forest practice; Sowing trials of graded acorns at Willingham Nursery in 1953; Work on limestone soils at Dalton Forest, Westmorland— 1951-55; Afforestation of iron stone workings in Northamptonshire; Planting the hard lee flow; Tine ploughing at Speymouth; Japanese larch on an area of rank weed growth; The economic approach to weeding in the establishment of trees; A note on some mixed conifer plantations in Mid-Wales; Some notes on the management of natural ash crops; Cultivation of willows for basket making; Eucalyptus at Whittingehame Estate, East Lothian; Araucarias at Monreith Estate, Wigtownshire; Notes on some North American trees; Prevent forest fires; Fire on the hills; Introducing pyrology; A handy trailer for fire fighting; Notes on fire protection at Lyminge Forest, Kent; The control of deer in Commission forests, with particular reference to England; The roe dee; Fighting the pine beauty moth with the todd insecticidal fog applicator; Needle diseases of conifers; Forest engineering economics; British forestry development in the early twentieth century; Education for administration; Should we go back?; Discounts and decimals; A fish hatchery; Greenfinches and Lawson cypress; British timbers The Brandon Depot, Thetford Chase; The Ari Sawmill at Strachur; The Chipboard Factory at Annan; The preparation of wood wool at Mortimer Forest; What can there be in a ladder?; The use of wood in musical instruments; Charcoal burning in Sussex; Conifer barks as a source of tannins for the leather industry.

155 x 245mm | 260 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO025
Journal
Forestry Commission
1955
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-fourth Journal includes information on: The forests of Sicily; A tour of French forests; Fourth World Forestry Congress Dehra Dun, India — December 1954; A note on forestry in Northern Ireland; Alice Holt Forest: contributions to its history; The Benmore Forest Garden; Larch plantations at Atholl and Dunkeld; Collection of lodgepole pine seed from British Crops; Variation in branch form in the progeny of individual Japanese larch trees; Whence those hops?; Notes on ploughing equipment; Establishment of hardwoods in Scotland; Notes on planting periods and resultant percentage of failure; Treatment of felled broadleaved areas in the Midlands; Tree growth on acid soil; Planting Corsican pine in trenches ploughed in sand; Watten experimental area, Caithness; Lime-induced chlorosis of Corsican pine at Friston Forest, Sussex; Grey squirrel enquiry; Monetary return from thinning a thirteen-year old Japanese larch stand at Allerston Forest; Hints on the care and use of axes; Mobile accommodation units; Converting a motorcycle to carry two knapsack fire pumps; A handy staple extractor; A cone splitter for seed sampling; A vanishing craft, “aesculus”; The future of home grown softwoods; The thinnings house, timber development association; Notes on home grown timber and its use on the farm; The preservative treatment of timber; Newsprint production at Sittingbourne, Kent; District Officer home Forestry Commission: to be or not to be?; Preliminary working plan reports; Newcomers to Northumberland forest villages; Glenmore Lodge. Scottish council of physical recreation; The work of the nature conservancy; Bird notes from Lynford Hall; British Bryological Society field excursion, Arnside, Westmorland; A note on the ecology of the limestone pavement in Westmorland; Reflections; Book review: in the Western Highlands; Norwegian idyll; Seventeenth century forestry on a Hertfordshire estate; Ornamentals.

155 x 245mm | 204 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO024
Journal
Forestry Commission
1952-54
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-third Journal includes information on: Lord Robinson, O.B.E; Notes on the sixth British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, 1952, and forestry in Canada; A visit to Denmark and Sweden; Forest tree breeding in Sweden; Italian and Swiss research; Forest pathology in Eire; Pinus contorta in County Wicklow, Eire; Picea omorika; The British Association Meeting in Liverpool, 1953; Preserving Scots pine strains after the 1953 windblow in North-east Scotland; The Kinver nursery; A method of wWorking heavy nursery soils with a ridge plough; Seedbed root pruning machines; Raising hardwood planting stocks by undercutting; Eradication of rhododendrons; Natural regeneration at 1,200 feet above sea level at Glasfynydd Forest; A grazing experiment in Redesdale Forest; A hybrid larch stand at Staindale, Allerston Forest; A modern approach to thinning practice; Smallwood from conifer thinnings; Lightning and forest fires at Rosedale Forest; Lightning and forest fires at Langdale Forest; Thetford type static water tanks; Observations on windblow in young plantations at Allerston; Rabbit clearance in King’s Forest, 1947 to 1951; Vole damage to trees at ten feet from ground level; Dendroctonus micans, a continental pest of Sitka spruce; Fomes annosus in East Anglian pine sample plots; Forest bridges; The integration of Forest Officers duties in Commission forests and private woodlands; The balance sheet and supporting schedules; Natural history notes from the Highlands; Report of the Lynford School Bird Club; Raids on nest boxes by weasels; Natural vegetation of oakwoods in Alice Holt Forest; The marsh pennywort, hydrocotyle vulgaris, as a weed in Newborough Nursery.

155 x 245mm | 144 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO023
Journal
Forestry Commission
1951
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-second Journal includes information on: The European Commission for Forestry and Forest Products; The British Association meeting at Edinburgh, August, 1951; American commentary; A Tour of Danish forests; Denmark diary; Notes on a tour of south and central Sweden; Fertility in forest soils; Natural regeneration of old caledonian Scots pine at Rannoch; The dispersal of hardwood seeds by voles and mice; Rehabilitation at Plym Forest, Devon; The Field Officer and the choice of species; The choice of tree species in Scotland; Extension of nursery experiments into Radnor Forest; Planting beech at West Woods with and without cover; Eccentric growth; European larch races; A report of work on poplars and poplar cultivation in Great Britain, 1951; Aspen poplars in Great Britain; An audible fire warning system at Thetford Chase; Gale warning: windblow in western spruce plantations; A tree shield to prevent injury when tushing Logs; Damage by starlings to trees at Slebech Forest, South Wales; An early proposal for state control of woodland; Rights of way; Fundamentals of road planning; Income and expenditure accounts or cash accounts?; Breckland bird studies; Old brecks or new forests?; A forest herbarium; Literature on forestry in Scotland; Bringing forestry to the public; The Merrick climbed; Roe deer in Austria.

155 x 245mm | 164 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO022
Journal
Forestry Commission
1950
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twenty-first Journal includes information on: Lessons from Sweden; Notes on afforestation and nursery work in the North-Eastern United States; The treatment of devastated woodland; Notes on the state forests of West Glamorgan; Craig Phadrig Forest; Glen Urquhart Forest; Guisachan Forest; Whence the seed?; Acorn collection and storage; Beech seed collection; Comparisons of three methods of storing beech mast; Vermin destruction in seed stores; Problems affecting heathland nurseries and their produce; Heathland nurseries at Devilla; Preparation of a heathland nursery; Further notes on compost and its application; Nursery mechanisation; Lining-out seedlings; Lupin as a green crop; Kinver nursery; Ploughing the Yorkshire Moors for tree planting, 1869; The formation in one year of a single plantation of one thousand acres; Planting Douglas fir in rhododendrons at Creag Liath, Glen Garry Forest; A new planting bag; Turf planting of birch; Thinning plans; Thinning by piece wWork, estimation of average volume per pole. (Technical Instruction No. 1/49); Pruning of oak; Pruning of Corsican pine; Growth comparisons of Scots and lodgepole pines on heather areas at Gwydyr Forest; The selection of sSites for Japanese and hybrid larches; Exceptional growth of Japanese larch; The growth of bBeech in relation to type; Black Italian poplars at Thetford; A fire at Cannock Chase; Fire danger at Clipstone; Fire beater stands; Deer through the eyes of a non-forester; Rabbits in hazel coppice; Grey squirrel damage; Bird scaring at Savernake; Beetle attacks following fires at Wareham Forest; Barypeithes pellucidus at Haldon; Barypeithes araneiformis; The marking and sale of thinnings; Methods of extraction of thinnings at Glentress Forest; Douglas pale fencing; Notes on the wood-using industries of New York; Produce from a twenty-three year old silver fir plantation; Another angle on soils; Forest roadwork in the North West England Conservancy; The mechanical development committees; The utilisation of the high tops; Dedicating the Cawdor Woodlands; Putting it on paper; A note on silvicultural literature in the United States of America; Additions to the Forestry Commission Library; United Nations Scientific Conference on the conservation and utilisation of resources; Organisation and methods in a conservancy office; The replacement of forest clerical staff by Area Officers; Publications work; On showing off forests; Rainy weather; The weather in forest year 1949; The staff suggestion scheme; A course at Northerwood; A tribute to the pioneers.

155 x 245mm | 208 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO021
Journal
Forestry Commission
1949
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twentieth Journal includes information on: Imported seed; Laboratory germination tests for forest tree seed; Breeding forest trees; The elite tree; Adevice for collecting cones; The storage of beech mast and acorns (silvicultural circular No. 25); Nursery practice (silvicultural circular No. 21); Manuring of nurseries (silvicultural circular No.23); Nursery practice (silvicultural circular No.26); Soil sampling in forest nurseries (appendix to silvicultural circular No.26); The treatment of nursery soils; Acidification at Barcaldine Nursery; Nursery sowing programmes and yields; Selective weed killers in conifer seedbeds and transplant lines; Robinia pseudoacacia; Three provenances of maritime pine in the nursery; Recovery of frosted Sitka spruce seedlings; A note on Australian forestry; The census of woodlands— some impressions; Notes on the state forests in Lincolnshire; Some observations on the Halwill Moors, Devonshire; The Black Wood of Rannoch; Millbuie Forest— Black Isle; Cwmogwr Forest; Selection of species at Radnor Forest; The high elevationexperiment at Beddgelert Forest; Forestry and amenity; Natural regeneration; Recent direct sowing experiments on the Yorkshire Heathlands; Vegetational changes following the afforestation of Calluna Heaths in Yorkshire; Mechanical draining for afforestation; Hints on fencing; Protection of forest fences by tarring of netting; Ploughing plans; Planting bags; The suppression of coppice by weeding; The treatment of a sheep-damaged oak plantation at Nagshead—Forest of Dean; The brashing and thinning of spruces and Douglas fir; Recording of thinning yields in plantations (silvicultural circular No.22); Average yields from thinnings; Estimation of volume of main crop from thinnings in one-tenth acre plots; Crown thinning; The use of stand density indices for describing thinnings; O tempora! O mores!; Treatment of Scots pine plantations in the Black Isle; Larch plantations at Glentress Forest; Rapid growth of Japanese larch in Cornwall; What is hybrid larch?; Height and girth assessment of the parents of the Dunkeld hybrid larch; Observations on ice-dam aged Douglas fir at Kerry forest; Metasequoia glyptostroboides; A rough-barked beech; Highland birch; Three fine specimens of oak in the Forest of Dean; The walnut; Distribution of the moss thuidium tamariscinum in British hardwood stands; The great fire of Hattlich-Eupen, September, 1947; The Chirdon fire; Railway fires and preventive measures; Prevention of fires caused by Commission employees (Director General’s circular); Fire brooms; Grey squirrels at Savernake; Vole damage in the Border forests; A keeper’s day; Vermin trouble; Forest ornithological research in Britain; Ips sexdentatus, an insect pest attacking pine plantations (silvicultural circular No.24); Notes on the die-back of European larch; Coryneum canker of cypress; Dying of groups of Sitka spruce; Bark stripping in the Forest of Dean; The need for care when felling timber; Dragging poles; Notes on the weight and volume of green wood of Scots and Corsican pines (note from Forest Products Research Laboratory); The mechanisation of forest road construction in Scotland; Forest roads and extraction costs; Preservation of existing natural protection for old houses; The use of aerial photographs on census work; Some observations on forest maps and records; The international union of forest research organisations; European Commission on forestry and forest products, Geneva, July, 1948; Organisation and methods at conservancy level; Permanent instructions; The estate section; Filing of proof slips; The staff suggestion scheme (secretary’s circular); Sources of information; Amateur photography in forestry; Touring in Indian forests; New forest common rights; History of Blengdale, Wormgill and Calder; Woodman, square that tree!.

155 x 245mm | 290 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO020
Journal
Forestry Commission
1948
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This nineteenth Journal includes information on: High pruning with chisels; The work of the sample plot parties; Fire protection at Newton Dale; Snow damage of the winter, 1946-47; Longitudinal splits in growing conifers; Damage by squirrels; Vole damage; Insect pests in north-west Germany during 1946-47; Attack by caterpillars on a beech plantation; Canker on young coniferous crops; Utilization; Notes on produce in the New Forest; Extraction problem; Christmas trees from Norway spruce thinnings; H.T.P.D. experience in relation to forestry; Public relations and forestry; The soil survey of Great Britain; Surveying and mapping forest areas from aerial photographs; Weather and work; New Forest committee; Why did that accident happen?; Impressions of a forester on returning from timber production; Reminiscences of Kershope training camp; Polish labour at Kershope Forest; Polish labour at Grey stoke; The German forester today; What O. and M . means; Organisation and methods in a conservancy office; Office management; Forest roads; Timber extraction over clay soils; The research engineer; Grizedale Forest and estate; Forest housing; Edmund Burt and his letters from the north of Scotland; One jump ahead; Adventure on horseback; Manuscripts for the press; The Forestry Commission library; Forestry abstracts.

155 x 245mm | 202 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO019
Journal
Forestry Commission
1939
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This eighteenth Journal includes information on: Progress report on research; Replanting and afforestation on chalk soils; Plant roll machine; Visit to Finland, August 1938; Forestry at Glasgow Exhibition; Tractor ploughing at palwill; A few notes on American forestry; Cuttings: methods of treatment; Summary report on chafer investigation, 1938; Raising of birch and alder from seed; R.S.F.S. summer meeting, 1938; Forestry Commission Social Service Association, 1938; Social service in Scotland; Cultivation of European and American walnut; The owl—the forester’s friend; Stratification of seed of Douglas fir, pinna contorta and birch; A worker’s holding that appeared; Utilisation of thinnings; Ceiriog experimental area; Japanese larch as a fire-break; Commission’s library: new books; The raising of poplars; Beech afforestation on chalk downland at Friston; The useful chiff-chaff; Charcoal; Sales of produce—ancient and modern; New Forest deer; Firelines; Nursery sowings of sycamore; Our Easter holiday; Planting and weeding of oak; Conifer and beech mixtures; Thoughts on afforestation; Treatment of peat a hundred years ago; Forestry and the “talkies”; Fire protection at Glentress; Fire-fighting; Girdling (ringing) of scrub; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 175 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO018
Journal
Forestry Commission
1938
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This seventeenth Journal includes information on: Progress report on research; Ploughing operations; Visit to North Germany; Trial survey of woodlands, 1937; R.S.F.S. summer meeting, 1937; Survey of chafers in forest nurseries; Line-survey method of estimating areas of species in mixed compartments; A forest vision; Working circle; Forestry Commission Social Service Association; Snow storm in the New Forest; Clay-coloured weevil; Commission’s library: new books; Birds in Chopwelhvood; Planting grants; Sitka spruce at harwood; Tractor ploughing at Allerston; Notes on Allerston I; Turf-planting at Kielder; Sitka spruce on Smale Farm; The lay-out of turf drains; Deer, foxes, etc., in Division I; Transferring of foremen and gangers; Nursery work at Halwill Forest; Checked plants: Cultivation and slag; Tair Onen nursery; Working plans and records; Sitka spruce; Botrytis cinerea on larch transplants; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 178 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO017
Journal
Forestry Commission
1937
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This sixteenth Journal includes information on: Progress report on research; A cheap method of ball planting; The French plant-roll machine; Green manuring in forest nurseries; R.E.F.S. excursion to Kent and Sussex, 1936; Chafer damage in nurseries in England and Wales; Progress report on chafer work, 1936; R.S.F.S. summer meeting, 1936; Assessment of checked plantations; Sand-distributing machine; Bath and West show at Neath, 1936; Fires on commission property: some statistics; Rotation of nursery crops; Crown forests in the reign of George III; Commission’s library: new books; Collection and packing of pathological material; Forestry Commission Social Service Association; Notes on forestry in South Africa; Forest of Dean thinning course; Compartmenting hill forests; Afforestation and amenity; Seed solving and plant lfting; Thinning operations; Pine weevil; Spruce on molinia; Deer, foxes and badgers in Division 5, 1937; Forest workers’ holdings, Clipstone Forest; Sowing of birch, oak and beech; Planting derelict coppice areas; Strip planting in coppice at Whitwell; Pre-thinning; Pre-thinning at Rendlesham; Siberian larch in Finland; Damage by red deer in the Highlands; Treatment of birch; Natural regeneration of Scots pine in Glenlov; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 160 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO016
Journal
Forestry Commission
1936
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fifteenth Journal includes information on: Progress report on research; Chernies cooleyi; Recent forest fires; R.S.F.S. summer meeting, 1935; Bird life at Thetford; Transport by mules; Forest protection in 1601; H.Q.; Planting of scree; Season of peeling conifer poles; Forest apprentices’ schools: Revised syllabus; Commission’s library: New books and journals; Swift moths; Pitprops; The Cadnam oak; New Forest callers; Divisional nurseries; Chafer damage; Norway maple; Forest roads; Forest protection in the Dean; Snow damage in a conifer area; Gale damage to plantations in Argyll; Frost damage at Benmore, May 1935; Frost damage at Fleet, May 1935; Hardwoods: date of solving; Upkeep of drains; Peat compost experiment; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 116 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO015
Journal
Forestry Commission
1935
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fourteenth Journal includes information on: Conference of Divisional Officers at Benmore; Ink disease and other root affections; Progress report on research; Divisional experiments on the turf planting of seedlings; The raising of strong conifer seedlings; Marketing of home-grown timber; Sitka spruce timber from Benmore; The simar rototiller; Nutrient content of nursery plants; R.S.F.S. summer meeting 1934; Study of pine shoot moth damage; Mechanical drainage; Damage by voles in Argyllshire; Growth of young trees in relation to beating-up; Circular on nursery work; Commission’s library: new books; Establishment of plantations; Vegetation as soil indicator; Planting distances; Chafer beetles; Replanting coppice areas; Coppice areas in the East Midlands; Map measuring; Preparation and sale of produce; Birch brooms; Fire protection (look-out towers); Tentsmuir and its flora; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 151 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO014
Journal
Forestry Commission
1934
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirteenth Journal includes information on: Forest fires in 1933; Progress report on research; Seedlings for turf planting; Office procedure; Root development on ploughed ground at Allerston; Effect of factors other than temperature on frost damage; Spraying against meria laricis; Soil aeration in establishing plantations; Use of basic slag in planting operations; Cost of ploughing by tractor; Experiments on density of bedding-out; Commission’s library: journals and new books; Temporary transplant nurseries; A wire netting suspension footbridge; Planting of scree; Damage by starlings; badgers; R.E.F.S. summer meeting, Sweden; Treatment of scrub; A Baltic sand-dune area; Effect of slag in first year; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 144 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO013
Journal
Forestry Commission
1933
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This twelfth Journal includes information on: Lord Lovat: an appreciation; Farewell dinner to Sir John Stirling-Maxwell; Use of seedlings for turf planting; Progress report on research; Plantations on the Carmarthen shales; Oak plantations in Northamptonshire; Friston forest; Corsican pine planting; Objects of management; The Royal Show, 1932; Pruning; The auto culto; Forest work of students at Dean; Oak areas: European larch as nurses; Young ash in Highmeadow; Artificial farmyard manure; Damage by voles; Birds and forestry; A profitable Japanese larch plantation; Fire protection; Trees as living things; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 118 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO012
Journal
Forestry Commission
1932
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This eleventh Journal includes information on: Wanting of spruce seedlings; Attractions of Benmore; Unofficial notes of a short official visit to Scotland; Progress report on research; Ancient monuments; R.E.A.S. summer meeting, 1931; A lvus orcgona; Use of seedlings for turf planting; Amount of weeding necessary for hardwoods; Sale of surplus land and buildings; Notes on Queen Charlotte Islands; Looking back; Summer planting of spruce; Hedges in nurseries; Preparation and sale of thinnings; Utilisation of thinnings; Planting of coppice areas; Sitka and Norway spruces at Kerry; Beating-up; Turf planting and the use of seedlings; Control of meriahriris; Thoughts on economy; Reducing the cost of planting; Soil fertility in nurseries; Miscellaneous notes.

155 x 245mm | 134 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO011
Journal
Forestry Commission
1931
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This tenth Journal includes information on: Clearing of fire rides; Pruning of over-sized Douglas fir and other conifers; Larch raised from sudeten (silesian) seed; Land acquisition in Scotland; Cost and erection of field telephones; R.E.A.S. summer meeting: forester’s report; Excursion of Roy. Scot. Forestry Society, Norfolk, 1930; Fixation of shifting sand; Report on inspection of afforestation grant schemes; Treatment of alder and birch in the nursery; Notes on fire protection in the Province of Quebec; Moor ploughing; Stock jobs; Applicants for F.W. Holdings; Divisional diversions; Building operations : Thetford Chase; Some problems of nursery practice; The aesthetic aspect of afforestation; On taking over the duties of a District Officer; Notes and queries; Reviews and abstracts.

155 x 245mm | 91 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO010
Journal
Forestry Commission
1930
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This ninth Journal includes information on: Conference of Divisional Officers, Dean Forest, 1929; Yield from seed of European larch (1929 nursery sowings); Hardwood plantations; Note on planting of hardwoods; Notes on forest estate work; Sale of conifer thinnings; A few tips to young foresters and foremen; Divisional correspondence; Forest telephones; Compartmenting, inspection paths and extraction rides; The drought of 1929; Forest protection and the general public; Defoliation of the oak;The winter moth; Entomological investigations; Mycological investigations; Excursion in northern Sweden, July, 1929; Excursion in south and central Sweden, July, 1929; Prospectus of schools for forest apprentices; Moor ploughing: operations at Allerston; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 130 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO009
Journal
Forestry Commission
1929
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This eigth Journal includes information on: The third Empire Forestry Conference; The past and the future; Resume of reports on experimental work; Some general observations on nursery work in Scotland; Notes on Forestry Commission Bulletin No. 11: Nursery investigations; Dutch Society for Heath Reclamation: Conference, 1928; Bedgebury Arboretum; Sales of timber; European larch seed: Enquiry into quality of different seed lots; Memorandum on the raising of European larch; Windsor nurseries; Distinguishing characters of forms of Douglas fir; Our office methods; The pricing of plants; Forest products research; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 120 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO008
Journal
Forestry Commission
1928
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This seventh Journal includes information on: Forest workers’ holdings; Review of progress in research and experiment; Short cuts for working plans; Unofficial notes on an official visit; Buildings for forest workers’ holdings; The immediate control of operations; Duties of a District Officer; Some problems in land acquisition; Attitude of the populace in Wales towards the Commission’s operations; Timber prices, 1927; Tintern woods: Produce and prices; Office organisation; Divisional organisation; Nursery management and general practice; Forestry and sporting rights; Notes on forestry in Canada; Storm damage in sample plots; Effects of spring frosts of 1927; Plantation fires; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 132 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO007
Journal
Forestry Commission
1927
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This sixth Journal includes information on: Review of progress in research and experiment; The cultivation of walnut; The forester as a naturalist; Cupressus macrocarpa on the South Downs; Sitka spruce in Denmark; Norway and Sitka spruce planting; The Annual Report; Some reflections on forest clothes; Uniforms for foresters in Scotland; Timber markets and prices; Some impressions on land acquisition; Use of paper mulch in nursery lines; Protection against weeds in nurseries; Use of chemically treated flax; Use of fabric material at Gwydyr; Thinning; The work and duties of a District Officer; Mountain moorland afforestation; Sitka spruce transplants of different origins: Susceptibility to frost; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries; Random jottings.

155 x 245mm | 88 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO006
Journal
Forestry Commission
1926
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fifth Journal includes information on: Research work; The forests of Rumania; Working plans: the official code; Losses in lined-out plants in England and Wales, 1925; Direct sowings: a plea for perseverance; The conversion of coppice with standards to high horest in Normandy; A suggested method of planting on a poor seaside muirland; The influence of various types of moorland soils on the growth of young plantations; A method of dealing with unmarketable birch; The cut-worm— a nursery pest; Oliorhynchus picipes damage done at Margam, Glamorgan; Fire control; Timber jottings; Forestry school ex-trainees; Saving time on time-sheets; The work of an officer in charge of a district; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 88 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO005
Journal
Forestry Commission
1925
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This fourth Journal includes information on: Notes on forestry in Switzerland; Seed extraction; Local nurseries versus large central nurseries; Screefing, its merits and demerits; Heeling-in plants on forest areas; Protection against sheep damage; Employment of casual labour; Foresters’ clerical work; Sixty years’ hence; The modern aspect of forest entomology; Reviews and abstracts; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 68 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO004
Journal
Forestry Commission
1924
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This third Journal includes information on: Objects and scope of the Forestry Commission’s experimental and research work; Unemployment grants; Nursery stock-taking; Forestry and the Imperial Economic Conference; British Empire Forestry Conference, Canada, 1923; Notes on North American forests; Forests of the Eastern United States; Seed supply from British Columbia; The work of the forester in charge of a forest; The green spruce aphid; Piece-work planting; The protection of young plantations on moorland areas; The size of plants in connection with weeding; The forester’s figures; Making the most of your seedlings; Blackgame; Notes and queries.

155 x 245mm | 62 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO003
Journal
Forestry Commission
1923
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This second Journal includes information on: Research and experiment: meeting of technical officers; Road-making in relief of unemployment—Forest of Dean and Highmeadow Woods, and Tintern Woods; Discussion on the training of foremen; Recent work on the pine weevil; The green spruce aphis; The cockchafer problem; The Silver Fir chernies; Note on pan formation; Larch-Beech sample plots in Switzerland; Direct sowing in the forest; Registration of identification numbers; Abstracts from current literature.

155 x 245mm | 82 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO002
Journal
Forestry Commission
1922
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels' and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff. The introduction to this first Journal states that:

'All noteworthy observations in forestry matters made in the field should be recorded. It is well to remember that original observations on things which are new, uncommon, or even merely interesting, are always of value and if recorded may one day prove of considerable importance'.

This first Journal includes information on: Loss caused by frost-lifting; Protection of seedlings from frost; Foresters’ schools; Training of foremen; Notes on co-ordination work; Afforestation in the U.S.A.; Report on research and experimental work; Peat research; Notes from the Divisions; Notes and queries; Abstracts of articles in current periodicals.

155 x 245mm | 62 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO001
Booklet
P.N. Edwards
1998
This Booklet is designed purely for field use. It assumes some knowledge of, and training in, forest measurement procedures which are more fully described in the Forest Mensuration Handbook by G. J. Hamilton, and the reader is referred to this publication for further information. However, the present Booklet contains all the mensurational information which may be needed in the forest for measuring both standing trees and felled timber.
102 x 203mm | 64 pages | black and white
0-85538-403-4
£4.00
Stock code:FCBK049
Booklet
J.S.P. Sale, P.M. Tabbush, P.B. Lane
1986
This is the first revision of the original 1983 edition of this Booklet and incorporates recent developments in herbicides, equipment and methods of application. The diagnosis of weed problems is not covered in detail. The assumption is made that the reader will have an adequate general knowledge of forest management and an appreciation of other non-herbicidal methods of weed control against which to weigh the treatments recommended here. Herbicide entries are set out in a standard format: descriptions of approved products, properties, toxicity and crop tolerance lead on to recommendations for application rates, methods and timing, followed by notes on limitations of use, safety precautions and protective clothing.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

152 x 210mm | 126 pages | 1 colour figure | 2nd edition
0-85538-207-4
£2.50
Stock code:FCBK051
Booklet
Alan F. Mitchell
1985
Christmas trees, monkey puzzles, cypresses - just some of the widely known and well-loved conifers which are such an important part of British natural and man-made landscapes.

But how to tell a juniper from a larch? A Douglas from a Silver fir? Why is the softwood from conifers used far more widely than the broadleaves’ hardwood? Which are Britain’s native conifers - and which exotic species were introduced from Europe, the Americas and Asia?

Alan Mitchell’s fascinating guide to conifers features 40 types: two natives, the rest brought to Britain over the years. A number of varieties are now planted on a large scale, and many are familiar sights in parks and gardens.

Conifers reveals the extraordinary story of the Dawn Redwood, until 1941 known only from fossils dating back 100 million years but then found alive and well in China. It describes the enormous Sequoia sem pervirens - Coast Redwood - many American examples of which measure well over 100 metres and are still growing. And it examines some of the more common conifers which, because they thrive even in poor conditions, are so important to economies all over the world.
210 x 197mm | 68 pages | colour photographs | 3rd edition
0-11-710040-4
£2.95
Stock code:FCBK015
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin, Alan F Mitchell
1985
It’s impossible to imagine the British landscape without its broadleaved trees. Horse chestnut, holly, beech and birch - all have long been admired and valued not only because of their timber-producing capacity but also for their beauty.

The broadleaves of Britain form part of that vast natural forest of northern Europe which once stretched from the Atlantic to the Steppes of Russia. Formerly important as sources of building material and fuel, their main contribution nowadays is as shade- and shelter-providers although some - oak, ash, sycamore and lime - are still used by furniture-makers and willow remains the traditional material for cricket bats.

Herbert Edlin's introduction to broadleaves - now revised by a recently retired Forestry Commission expert - guides the reader towards a detailed knowledge of these trees. It covers the functions of leaf, flower and fruit: aids accurate identification of the different varieties by descriptions and drawings, and discusses the habitats where each species can be found.
203 x 190mm | 128 pages | colour photographs | 2nd edition
0-11-710039-0
Free
Stock code:FCBK020
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1985
This Booklet provides information on the mid diameter method, which is the traditional method for estimating the volume of logs. The first edition of this work was called the Metric volume ready reckoner for round timber.
100 x 205mm | 84 pages | black and white | 2nd edition
0-11-710045-5
Free
Stock code:FCBK026
Booklet
T.J.D. Rollinson
1985
This booklet is designed for field use. It provides a simple guide to the control of volume to be removed when marking a thinning. There are three sections. The first section describes the Yield Class system and the assessment of yield class in a stand. The second section covers thinning practice, that is, the type, intensity and cycle of thinning, how to calculate the thinning yield, the timing of thinning, and how the thinning is controlled. The final section describes the field procedures for estimation of top height, basal area and volume marked, and how to calculate mean diameter. A checklist of the office and field procedures to be followed when marking a thinning is printed on page 56.
100 x 205mm | 56 pages | colour graphs
0-11-710194-X
Free
Stock code:FCBK054
Booklet
O.N. Blatchford
1983
This is the first Booklet dedicated to chemicals other than herbicides used in forestry. It is suggested that this publication is kept with its companion volume The use of herbicides in the forest (Booklet 51) to give a comprehensive reference to the use of all chemicals in the forest. Although produced primarily for internal use by FC staff, both these publications have been made available to the private forestry sector. It should be noted that the information and recommendations given are relevant to conditions in the Forestry Commission’s forests, and no responsibility can be taken for treatments applied elsewhere.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

152 x 210mm | 64 pages | black and white
0-85538-171-X
£1.50
Stock code:FCBK052
Booklet
J. Evans
1983
This Booklet describes the species named in an Arboriculture Research Note on eucalypts in Britain by Evans (1980) plus a few others, and the principal species grown in Ireland referred to by Mooney (1960).The most successful species are from areas of temperate climate in Australia and are relatively frost tolerant. The characters used are those that are usually available on specimens in the field. A synopsis of the life cycle and morphological features of a eucalypt plant is provided to assist readers who are unfamiliar with the genus Eucalyptus.
190 x 235mm | 36 pages | black and white
0-11-710192-3
Free
Stock code:FCBK050
Booklet
T.G. Winter
1983
The main objective of this catalogue is to bring some uniformity into exchanges concerning forest entomology. It consists of three lists: a basic one and two supplementary. The basic list includes all species in Pests and diseases of forest plantation trees (F G Brown, 1968) occurring in Britain, to which have been added many others from both the literature and from records kept by the Entomology Branch of the Forestry Commission Research and Development Division. Besides insects the list also includes some mites and several nematodes. This list was originally designed for use within the F.C. Research Division as a source of valid insect names and authors together with a selected synonymy for all species with some claim to forest importance or significance. The species included show great variability in status, some being pests of economic importance, while others are of interest only. It should be noted that some synonyms may be invalid but are included because they have been used in forest literature. The two supplementary lists provide cross-references for common English names and host plants.
210 x 298mm | 64 pages | black and white
0-85538-173-6
£2.00
Stock code:FCBK053
Booklet
P.N. Edwards, J.M. Christie
1981
This booklet, with its associated yield models and curves, replaces Forestry Commission Booklet Number 34 Forest Management Tables (Metric) by G. J. Hamilton and J. M. Christie, which was published by HMSO in 1971. Yield models can be constructed to simulate the effects of any silvicultural treatment, and the ‘normal yield tables’ included in the earlier publication were models of a specified ‘normal’ treatment. A much wider range of yield models is now available. The format of the yield models is very similar to that of the Normal Yield Tables published previously, except that the current annual increments and the assortment forecasts have been omitted. The models have again been produced directly from computer output.

An new version of this Booklet was produced in 2016.

210 x 146mm | 32 pages | black and white
0-85538-092-6
Free
Stock code:FCBK048
Booklet
R.J.N. Busby, A.J. Grayson
1981
The purpose of this Booklet is to outline the basic concepts of investment appraisal as they apply to forestry, to provide tables of use in appraisal and to illustrate their application to a variety of cases in forestry.
152 x 210mm | 96 pages | black and white
0-11-710190-7
£3.75
Stock code:FCBK047
Booklet
Sylvia Crowe
1978
This booklet is an extensive revision of Booklet 18 Forestry in the landscape published in 1966. The author has unique experience of landscaping British forests over many years, and her opinions on landscape design principles, which should be applied in forestry to obtain a satisfactory balance between beauty and function in the landscape, are admirably outlined in this Booklet. The authors principles have been adopted as the Forestry Commission's policy on landscape design and will be implemented by its staff. This Booklet will be of interest to the general public who may gain a fuller understanding of the landscape design objectives of the Forestry Commission, to woodland owners whose aim of caring for the countryside is similar to our own, and to countries abroad with similar landscape problems.
216 x 279mm | 48 pages | colour photogrpahs
0-11-710186-9
Free
Stock code:FCBK044
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1978
The demand from private forestry for guidance on payment of workers has increased enormously over the past few years and to meet these needs, the Forestry Commission has decided to publish current tables in the form of a Booklet every few years.
152 x 203mm | 412 pages | black and white
0-11-710037-4
Free
Stock code:FCBK045
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1978
Small woodlands, of various types, scattered widely over the countryside are a major feature of the landscape and form valuable assets for timber production, wildlife and game conservation. The purpose of this Booklet is to provide the basic information for the establishment and management of small woods emphasising ways and means of modifying forestry practice to adapt it to their needs.
152 x 243mm | 40 pages | black and white
0-11-710188-5
Free
Stock code:FCBK046
Booklet
A.A. Rowan
1976
Forest roads are built to provide access to the forest for general management purposes and for the transport of timber to the market. The building of forest roads involves heavy capital expenditure and, in addition, there is a continuing charge for road maintenance. Against this, the actual cost of movement along roads is less, distance for distance, than the costs of movement across country. Therefore forest road planning is essentially concerned with determining the combination of on-road and off-road transport systems that is most cost effective.
178 x 241mm | 33 pages | black and white
0-11-710025-0
Free
Stock code:FCBK043
Booklet
R.M. Brown
1975
This Booklet gives recommendations on the use of herbicides in British forests. It replaces Forestry Commission Leaflet 51, also entitled Chemical Control of Weeds in the Forest. Suitable types of equipment are generally described in Chapter 8, but detailed advice on the most suitable type and make of spraying equipment is not given as this can be found in Forestry Commission Bulletin 48, Weeding in the Forest. Recommendations for the use of herbicides in forest nurseries can be found in Forestry Commission Bulletin 43, Nursery Practice.

Note: This is an archive publication. Always consult the most recent guidance for up-to-date information.

178 x 241mm | 79 pages | black and white
0-11-710185-0
Free
Stock code:FCBK040
Booklet
G.J. Hamilton
1975
Measurement of timber is required for several purposes. The most obvious of these, perhaps, is the need to quantify forest produce for sale. Measurement of timber is also required in management, notably for planning purposes and for control of resources. This publication is intended to provide the information necessary to meet the needs of measurement for most purposes and conditions in British forestry. The main components are, first, a key which enables the user to choose the measurement procedure most appropriate for the purpose intended. Secondly, detailed measurement procedures are given separately for felled and standing timber. Essential background information is given with each of the procedures which are individually numbered. The tables required to carry out some of these procedures are produced in Part VI. Miscellaneous aspects of measurement, together with conversion factors, abbreviations, etc are brought together in Part V.

An updated version of this handbook was produced in 2006.

140 x 216mm | 276 pages | black and white
0-11-710023-4
Free
Stock code:FCBK039
Booklet
J. Jobling, A.F. Mitchell
1974
The elms described in this Booklet are the species, varieties and hybrids commonly found in the countryside, in parks, and at the roadside in towns. They are:

English elm, Ulmus procera Salisbury
Wych elm, U. glabra Hudson
Smooth-leaved elm, U. carpinifolia Gleditsch var. carpinifolia
Cornish elm, U. carpinifolia var. cornubiensis (Weston) Rehder
Wheatley elm, U. carpinifolia var. sarniensis (Loudon) Rehder
Dutch elm, U. xhollandica Miller 'Hollandica'
Huntingdon elm, U. xhollandica Miller 'Vegeta'.

The primary features which can often be used to provide an absolute identification of a mature elm at any time of the year are the characteristic form of the crown and the colour and appearance of the bark. The shape of the leaf and the texture of the upper surface of the leaf are also important secondary features. This Booklet includes photographs, line drawings and descriptions to show these features and to help with the identification of elms in the field.
216 x 279mm | 24 pages | black and white + some colour photographs
0-11-710024-2
Free
Stock code:FCBK042
Booklet
J.E. Everard
1974
The purpose of this publication is to answer some of the questions commonly asked about the use of fertilisers in young forest crops in Southern Britain, that is south of the counties of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and to summarise the evidence on which recommended practice is based. The three main sources of information are:

i. experiments in which deficient crops were topdressed or where different rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K ) fertilisers were applied at planting.
ii. the results of fertilising forest crops in which nutrient deficiency had been diagnosed by foliar analysis.
iii. experience of the practical use of fertilisers at or following planting.

178 x 241mm | 60 pages | colour photographs
0-11-710022-6
Free
Stock code:FCBK041
Booklet
Alan F. Mitchell, John Williams
1973
This Booklet provides basic information to help users identify common broadleaved and coniferous trees found in Britain. Thirty two species are included with drawings showing tree shapes, leaves and fruit/flowers.
102 x 216mm | 20 pages | black and white
0-11-710019-6
Free
Stock code:FCBK038
Booklet
G.J. Hamilton
1973
The methods of measurement described in this Booklet are intended to be used primarily in connection with the sale of standing timber. The procedures described involve the use of tariff tables which have been used for this purpose by the Forestry Commission since 1956. The tariff system of measurement has subsequently proved efficient and reliable, provided that the recommended procedures have been correctly followed. Whereas previously the use of the tariff system was confined to certain clearly defined conditions, it is now considered better to use the tariff system than any other method of measuring standing timber, in almost any kind of crop. The system described here can be applied to both thinnings and fellings.
147 x 209mm | 31 pages | black and white
0-11-710018-8
Free
Stock code:FCBK036
Booklet
G.J. Hamilton
1973
The tables contained in this booklet are designed to provide estimates of volume from length and top diameter measurements. The length and top diameter specifications of pitwood are unique, and require tables specially designed to cater for these specifications. The smallwood tables provide volumes of small diameter roundwood, other than pitwood, where conventional length and top diameter specifications are applicable.
148 x 210mm | 5 pages | black and white
0-11-710020-X
Free
Stock code:FCBK037
Booklet
R.C. Steele
1972
The aim of this Booklet is to show how woodlands managed mainly for wood production can be improved as habitats for wildlife. It is concerned with identifying those features of woodlands which promote wildlife conservation and suggesting how these features can be maintained or introduced by management. It suggests that wildlife conservation can and should be a management objective in all woodlands, whatever the other aims of management. The extent to which these recommendations are put into practice will depend on local circumstances but it is hoped that this Booklet will be of value to every forest manager and those interested in improving woodlands as wildlife habitats.
216 x 279mm | 68 pages | black and white
0-11-710015-3
Free
Stock code:FCBK029
Booklet
Alan F. Mitchell, Christine Darter
1972
This booklet contains a wealth of information on conifers from roughly 580 estates, gardens, parks and collections. Some outstanding trees previously unrecorded have been found and the best of these have been included. Specimens outside the general range of their species in this country are given precedence even if of no great size. Trees recorded in previous works have also been given some precedence and are included if they have made good, or occasionally, exceptionally little, growth. The coverage in this Booklet is intended to show the range of the species, and of the larger specimens; the largest, the finest and those of the most rapid growth. Special attention has been paid to the oldest or original trees surviving, as, in many cases, this is likely to be the last survey in which they will appear as living trees. The text describes 43 genera, 270 species and a further 217 varieties or cultivars. It mentions 526 arboreta and gardens that have been visited by the author, and twenty-four species are shown in full-page photographs.
216 x 279mm | 350 pages | black and white
0-11-710012-9
Free
Stock code:FCBK033
Booklet
J.E. Everard
1971
This Booklet builds on the information provided in Booklet 5 Conversion tables for research workers in forestry and agriculture. Additional tables have been added, while other tables of limited use have been removed. Numerous conversion factors have been included to enable conversions to be made for less frequently used units.
152 x 210mm | 80 pages | black and white
0-11-710007-2
Free
Stock code:FCBK030
Booklet
Donald L. Shaw
1971
In 1920 the Forestry Commission began the transformation of a great expanse of steep hillside and moorland, around Betws-y-Coed in North Wales, into modern productive forest. The few old oakwoods that remained, and the remarkable scenery of riverside, lake and crag were treated with the consideration they merited when spruce, larch, pine and Douglas fir were brought in. In 1937, to encourage wider public access to the woods and hills, the Forestry Commission embodied this young Gwydyr Forest into its Snowdonia Forest Park, which became encircled some ten years later by the larger Snowdonia National Park of the Countryside Commission.This Booklet aims to give a fuller understanding of all that forestry means to the uplands of North Wales and to their people.
140 x 216mm | 136 pages | black and white, two colour maps
0-11-710010-2
Free
Stock code:FCBK028
Booklet
R.T. Bradley
1971
This booklet provides a simple guide to the volume to be removed when thinning pure even-aged stands, or with suitable modifications, when thinning woods of mixed species and/or of uneven age. It replaces Booklet 17, the imperial version, from 1966.
133 x 184mm | 32 pages | colour curves
0-11-710011-0
Free
Stock code:FCBK032
Booklet
G.J. Hamilton, J.M. Christie
1971
The tables included in this Booklet are designed as aids to the management of forests in British conditions and where profitability is a primary objective. The Booklet is divided into four parts which are:

I — The Yield Class System of Classifying Growth Potential
II — Thinning Control
III— Production Forecasting
IV — Yield Tables

This publication is a revised, metric edition of Forestry Commission Booklet 16, Forest Management Tables, which was produced in Imperial units. The content and coverage of this present version remains, with minor exceptions, fundamentally unchanged from the original Booklet, although several changes have been made in the form of presentation.
140 x 216mm | 207 pages | colour curves
0-11-710013-7
Free
Stock code:FCBK034
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1971
With the general introduction of metric measurements in the dedicated and approved woodlands schemes with effect from October, 1971, the opportunity has been taken to re-examine the form of the standard Plan of Operations. This study has been carried out by the Forestry Commission in close consultation with the Timber Growers Organisation and the Scottish Woodland Owners Association. This Booklet, which takes the place of Booklet 7, has been prepared primarily for the guidance of landowners who have already brought, or who wish to bring, their woodlands into the Dedication or the Approved Woodland Schemes of the Forestry Commission.
145 x 210mm | 46 pages | black and white
0-11-710014-5
Free
Stock code:FCBK035
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1970
This Booklet contains tables which give volumes of softwood sawlogs for given lengths and top diameters in metric units.
184 x 216mm | 24 pages | black and white
0-11-710009-9
Free
Stock code:FCBK031
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1970
These tables are the metric equivalent of the old established Hoppus tables and are used in exactly the same way. Mid diameters in centimetres are used instead of mid quarter girth in inches, lengths are expressed in metres rather than in feet, and volumes are given in cubic metres.
100 x 205mm | 80 pages | black and white
0-11-710003-X
Free
Stock code:FCBK026
Booklet
H. L. Edlin
1969
Forest Parks have been established by the Forestry Commission in the belief that where mountainsides or other open country have been acquired in connection with the planting of extensive new forests, the whole should be open for public enjoyment. The first such Park, that in Argyll, was opened in 1935, and there are now seven Forest Parks, four being wholly in Scotland, one on the borders of Scotland and England, one in North Wales, and another on the borders of Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.
140 x 216mm | 52 pages | black and white | 2nd edition
0-11-710005-6
Free
Stock code:FCBK006
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin
1969
This Booklet contains a short account of the Commission’s achievements in the last fifty years, from 1919 until 1969.
216 x 279mm | 52 pages | some colour photographs
0-11-710002-1
Free
Stock code:FCBK023
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin
1969
The region covered by this Booklet is the southern third of Scotland, from the headwaters of the Tay in Perthshire, down to the Border. It holds the two great cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, the widespread industries that have been built up over the central coalfields, the richest farmlands and also—rather surprisingly—one-third of Scotland’s forests and woodlands. Because they lie so close at hand, these are the woods most often seen and visited by resident and tourist alike. Most of this Booklet is planned to show how best you can find and appreciate the woodlands of each county, while the photos provide a record of their unrivalled scenery and surroundings. But these forests are not simply lovely to look at. They have a long history and a well-planned future, both firmly linked with Scotland’s economy. It is fascinating to trace their origins from the remote past, and to see why people go on planting trees for the changed needs of today.
16 x 279mm | 92 pages | black and white
0-11-490247-X
Free
Stock code:FCBK025
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1969
This guide outlines proposals for the introduction of the metric system of weights and measures in British forestry and has been approved by the Forestry Commission and the Home Grown Timber Advisory Committee as a basis for more detailed planning by the individual sectors of the industry.
216 x 279mm | 12 pages | black and white
0-11-710004-8
Free
Stock code:FCBK027
Booklet
W.E.S. Mutch
1968
This Booklet presents the results of investigations during 1963 and 1964 into the demand by the public for the recreational use of some national forests in England and Scotland. The research was intended principally as a methodological study, and it forms part of a wider investigation into the multiple use of forests in Britain.
216 x 279mm | 102 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK021
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin, Chrsitine Darter
1968
All broadleaved trees belong to the great natural order of plants called the Dicotyledones, which are distinguished by having two seed-leaves or cotyledons in every seed. There are numerous families of these plants, many of which include both trees and smaller plants. Each family is defined, in a rather complicated way, on the basis of the structure of its flowers. A more practical approach is to learn the characters of each genus of trees, with the aid of a book such as this, which brings out their key features. Each plant family is made up of one or more genera, the members of which show a common pattern of bud, leaf, flower, and fruit. Each genus, in turn, consists of one or more species, distinguished by much smaller points of difference. As a handy working plan, the trees described in this booklet have been grouped alphabetically by their generic names, followed, again alphabetically, by the name of each species. The index on the inside back cover gives a quick reference from the English name of each tree.
216 x 279mm | 142 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK020
Booklet
C.A. Barrington
1968
This booklet sets out the natural setting of the woodlands of the Weald, a compact geographical region in the south-east of England. It discusses their history and economic value, and aims to show how they can be preserved both as scenery and as a source of useful timber.
216 x 279mm | 32 pages | black and white
0-11-710001-3
Free
Stock code:FCBK022
Booklet
R.F. Wood, I.A. Anderson
1968
The sole purpose of this Booklet is to depict forestry under a wide range of conditions in Britain. The text and the captions to the photographs are kept to the shortest length necessary to offer an explanation of the diversity of forest scenery. No attempt has been made to classify land in any ordered scheme; indeed, the 'forest types' in this Booklet may well shock the forester or ecologist, and all that is claimed for them is that they are convenient 'labels' for tracts of country which by reason of topography, geology, soils and climate, have some community of conditions so far as the forest is concerned.
216 x 279mm | 78 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK024
Booklet
R.T. Bradley
1967
This booklet provides a simple guide to the volume to be removed when thinning pure, even-aged stands or, with suitable modifications, when thinning woods of mixed species and/or of uneven age.
190 x 133mm | 32 pages | colour graphs
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK017
Booklet
J.W. Barraclough
1967
There are real advantages in using the same tractor for nursery work, ride mowing and extraction. Full utilisation of the tractor means low machine costs, fewer stores and easier maintenance. This booklet describes how, in Thetford Forest, the same light agricultural tractors which are used for forest nursery work and forest ride mowing are used also for the extraction of produce from thinning and clear felling. The implements used with the tractor are cheap, and mostly blacksmith-made. They are good examples of the simple and efficient devices which can be evolved by the local staff concerned with the job.
137 x 212mm | 68 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK019
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1966
This booklet has been prepared primarily for the guidance of landowners who have already brought, or who wish to bring, their woodlands into the Dedication or the Approved Woodland Schemes of the Forestry Commission. It contains information on the preparation of the plan and map and on management and record keeping.
241 x 152mm | 48 pages | black and white | 2nd edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK007
Booklet
Herbert L. Edlin
1966
Conifers, or softwood trees, form a distinct group which has become very important in the world’s economy because they grow fast on poor soils even under harsh climates, and yield timbers that are very suitable for industry. They are now being planted and tended on a growing scale in most countries as a source of wealth, and this booklet shows you how to identify those most commonly found in Britain.
210 x 197mm | 56 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK015
Booklet
R.T. Bradley, J.M. Christie, D.R. Johnston
1966
The tables in this publication have been prepared with the object of providing a basis for the management of Forestry Commission plantations but they are equally applicable to any plantations which are managed primarily for profit. The Revised Yield Tables for Conifers in Great Britain published in 1953 (Forest Record Number 24) and all previous yield table publications (Forest Records 33, 36, 40, 47) are superseded by the Normal Yield Tables contained in this publication.

Supplement No.1 to Booklet 16 includes three further normal yield tables which cover the lower Yield Classes of Sitka and Norway spruce.

140 x 216mm | 226 pages | colour graphs
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK016
Booklet
Sylvia Crowe
1966
This booklet, written by Sylvia Crowe, draws largely on the impressions gained from her numerous and extensive visits to forests and woodlands in England, Scotland and Wales during the period when she was the Forestry Commission’s consultant. But the importance of the views expressed stems from Sylvia Crowe’s lifetime of experience, her constructive thought on the meaning of landscape and her outstanding position among landscape architects both here and abroad. This booklet will be of value and interest far outside the Commission’s own staff: to the public who may gain a fuller understanding of the landscaping objectives of the Forestry Commission: to other woodland owners whose aim of caring for the countryside is the same as our own: and to countries in Europe and further afield who may have landscape problems similar to our own.
216 x 279mm | 32 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK018
Booklet
R.J. Gladman, B.J.W. Greig
1965
This Booklet is planned as a forester’s guide to the recognition of the three most common and damaging decays of standing conifers in Great Britain. The fungi that cause these rots are the basidiomycetes Fomes annosus, Armillaria mellea, and Polyporus schweinilzii. They are primary root rotting organisms, infection usually beginning in the root system and developing there before proceeding into the stem, where more extensive damage is caused. In addition, however, they may all sometimes enter the stem by other means, for example through stem wounds. This Booklet includes illustrations and descriptions of both the early and the more characteristic advanced stages of rot caused by each of the fungi concerned. Brief notes on the occurrence and relative importance of each butt rot are also given.
165 x 206mm | 16 pages | some colour photographs
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK013
Booklet
E.V. Rogers
1965
This Booklet includes all the practical methods of controlling and killing rabbits in this country. Much has been written on the rabbit as the quarry of the sportsman and poacher and it is upon their experience the author has had to draw. Neither of these have the extermination of the rabbit as their aim but the methods used are the same. Hopefully through reading this booklet warreners and foresters will be encouraged to try all the methods described that suit their conditions, and will acquire the fieldcraft and skill needed to outwit this most expensive and destructive pest.
138 x 213mm | 28 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK014
Booklet
G. D. Rouse
1964
In the decade before the war the Forestry Commission took practical steps to meet the increasing needs of the population for large tracts of wild country to be put at their disposal for recreational purposes by establishing Forest Parks, the first such Forest Park being that of Argyll, created by the Forestry Commission with the co-operation of Glasgow Corporation in 1936. Other Forest Parks in Wales and England followed shortly afterwards; Snowdonia in 1937 and the Forest of Dean in 1938; and several others have since been established. Dartmoor National Park was created in 1951, with its bound aries extending well beyond those of the ancient Royal Forest of Dartmoor and the adjacent open moorland and commons.
165 x 203mm | 33 pages | black and white, two colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK010
Booklet
R. E. Crowther
1964
Extraction accounts for between 25 per cent, and 75 per cent, of the total costs of production, that is all costs up to roadside ready for despatch, but excluding growing the trees; this percentage, however, depends on the amount of conversion (crosscutting and peeling) and the length and difficulty of the extraction. For this reason, and because extraction is generally more easily mechanised than felling, examination and improvement of extraction methods is likely to be a fruitful way of reducing costs. This publication on extraction is one of a series on work in conifer thinnings; other aspects already described are felling and conversion by hand (Booklet 9); and aids to working (Booklet 8).
136 x 212mm | 93 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK011
Booklet
R.E. Crowther, S. Forrester
1964
The use of the double drum winch is not familiar to many people and hence this Booklet has been produced in the hope that it will be of assistance to those using the double drum winch for the first time. There are many points of organisation and technique that play a large part in achieving a high output using a double drum winch. This Booklet records those that have been found useful in this country to date, however, even though several pairs of operators have been employed, experience has been limited to a few machines and cannot be comprehensive.
136 x 212mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK012
Booklet
R. E. Crowther, I. Toulmin-Rothe
1963
The Work Study Section of the Forestry Commission has now (1963) been working on production operations for six years and this is a record of sound working methods observed during this period. The credit for developing these methods is due to Forest Workers and Foresters in various parts of the country and the authors have selected for description those methods that give maximum output with minimum effort and are basically safe. It is hoped that it will serve as a handbook for the Forester or Head Woodman who is about to commence first thinnings in a young forest and is faced with the problem of introducing sound methods to a labour force inexperienced in this work; figures showing the output that can be achieved by the average man are included.
36 x 210mm | 40 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK009
Booklet
S. Forrester
1962
This booklet is intended as a guide to some items of equipment which may not be widely known, and particularly to some which have been developed only in the past few years.The purpose of these tools is mainly to make work easier — reducing the effort involved or making operations quicker. Many are intended to eliminate or ease heavy lifting with its attendant risks. Others make it possible for one man to do a job which otherwise requires two.The aims in compiling this booklet have been: 1. to show what equipment has been produced, 2. to show what the equipment will do, and 3. to show where and when the equipment can be of value.
136 x 210mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK008
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1960
These tables and charts were prepared by the staff of the Research Branch and by other forest research workers to meet their own needs when preparing data for publication, when meeting foreign visitors and when reading foreign literature. They have been amplified and now are published so that others may avoid the laborious calculations that are sometimes necessary to bring continental units to more familiar terms.
140 x 216mm | 72 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK005
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1956
It is calculated that, when hostilities ceased in 1945, there were three million acres of privately owned woodlands in Great Britain and that of this acreage only half was productive; and it is well known that not all the productive woodlands were being efficiently managed to produce timber of the quality or quantity of which the land was capable. It was to remedy this situation that the Dedication Scheme was introduced. This Booklet provides information on the Plan of Operations, Forms of Covenant, and procedures.
150 x 245mm | 64 pages | black and white | 4th edition
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK002
Booklet
J.S. Murray
1955
The rust fungi or Uredinales are an important group of plant parasites, causing great losses to agricultural and forest crops each year. The life cycle of a typical rust is complex, as live types of spores are produced on two different and unrelated hosts, certain of the spore types being always borne on one host and the remainder on the other. Occasionally, however, the life cycle is incomplete and the fungus needs only one host. The production of each different spore form constitutes a separate stage in the life cycle of the rust, and each spore form, also, performs a specialised role. The mycelium of the fungus may be perennial, living in the host tissues and producing spores for a number of years, or it may live for less than a year, its existence coming to an end with the death of its host, or the death of that part of its host on which it has been subsisting. This booklet provides information on the majority of rusts affecting British forest trees.
165 x 206mm | 24 pages | black and white and colour photographs
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK004
Booklet
Forestry Commission
1950
In Britain, the sweet chestnut, Castanea sativa, is at the northern limit of its distribution, and as a forest tree it is of importance in the southern half of England only. So far, in Britain, it has not been seriously affected by disease, however, it is a serious matter that Chestnut Blight, which has ravaged the native stands of chestnut in the eastern United States, should now have established itself in Southern Europe. The purpose of this Booklet is to describe, with the aid of coloured illustrations, the appearance of the disease, so that familiarity with the symptoms may lead to rapid recognition of the fungus, should it ever reach this country.
184 x 268mm | 6 pages | colour illustrations
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK003
Booklet
H. Watson
1947
In present-day afforestation much attention is devoted to the wild plants as indicating soil and climatic conditions, but within recent times the ordinary mosses have been proved to be just as important. In the following notes an effort will be made, first to give a life history of a moss, secondly to indicate, as far as present knowledge permits, the soil and climatic conditions under which particular mosses are found and thirdly to illustrate each of these by means of photographs. The mosses selected are those which a forester is likely to meet frequently in the course of his work and so to use in assessing locality conditions.
166 x 210mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCBK001
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1989
Appendices to the history of Brandon Central Depot
230 x 350mm | 326 pages | blacy and white with colour plates
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH015
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1989
A history of Brandon Central Depot containing the following sections - introduction and acknowledgements, the site, buildings, staff, harvesting in the forest, pole supply - input, products and markets, operations and processes, organisation and management, administration, redevelopment, closure.
230 x 350mm | 259 pages | black and white, one colour image
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH014
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1989
Appendices to the history of Brandon Central Depot.
230 x 350mm | 262 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH016
Journal
Forestry Commission
1962
The Forestry Commission Journal was introduced as a way to communicate information on a wide range of topics which could not be communicated through 'ordinary official channels', and was intended to be a means of exchanging the opinions and experiences of all members of the staff.

This thirty-first Journal includes information on: The Eighth British Commonwealth Forestry Conference, East Africa, 1962; A Tour in North Uganda and Kenya; Note on Forest Areas in the Samburu District by Kenya Forest Department; Farm Forests in Austria, with Special Reference to Styria; Protection Forests in Switzerland; A Study Tour in Holland; A Visit to Denmark and Holland; Report on Rationalisation Course in Arnhem, Holland; Royal Scottish Forestry Society: 65th Annual Excursion to Perthshire,1962; The Royal Forestry Society of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland: Meeting at Cardiff; Problems of Soil Erosion and Stabilisation in Coastal Areas; Forestry and Landscape; Forestry at the John Colet Secondary School, Wendover, Bucks.; Opening of Hendre D du Log Cabin for the Outward Bound Sea School, Aberdovey; The New Shepherds; Game Fair, 1962; Visitors and Visiting: A Forester’s Other Duties; Reflections of an Auditor; Changing Times; Cartoon: Busy Beavers; Work Study Week at South Strome Forest; Maintenance of Power Saw Chains; A Method of Tool Storage; The Ledmore Mounted Lining-Out Plough, Mark III; Extracts from “Forest Products Research 1961”; Properties of 30-37 Year Old Sitka Spruce Timber: Extracts from The Forest Products Laboratory Bulletin; More Mighty Oaks; A Day in the Forest; The White Buck of Cannock Chase; Cartoon: Swinging The Cat!; Pine Cone Collection: Thetford, South District, 1962; Corsican Pine Cone Collection at Sherwood, Delamere and Cannock; Notes on Corsican Pine Cone Collection at Delamere Forest, 1961—1962; Coypu.

155 x 245mm | 176 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCJO031
Forest History
Forstry Commission
1952
A history of Edgarhope forest containing the Director's comments, comments by the State Forests Conservator, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 29 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH034
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Kirroughtree forest containing Chairman's comments, observations by the Conservator of State Forests, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 47 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH067
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Twiglees forest containing Chairman's comments, comments by Conservator of State Forests, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH063
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Hamsterley forest containing Chairman's comments, Conservator's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 61 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH073
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Delamere forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 36 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH031
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Clipstone forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 76 pages | colour graphs and maps
978-0-085538
Free
Stock code:FCFH023
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Clashindarroch forest containing Chairman's comments, comments by State Forests Officer, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 71 pages | black and white with colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH022
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Clocaenog forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, Conservator's comments and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 90 pages | black and white, colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH024
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Langdale forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 44 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH037
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Hamsted forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 45 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH071
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Kerry forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 32 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH069
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Ampleforth forest containing Chairman's comments, note by State Forests Officer, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 25 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH003
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Ardgarten forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 32 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH005
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Arkengarthdale forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 19 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH006
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Auchenroddan forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 18 pages | black and white with colour on map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH007
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Barcaldine forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 32 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH008
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Ampthill forest containing Chairman's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, addendum by district officer, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 26 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH004
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Bardney forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 43 pages | black and white with colour on map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH009
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Bramshill forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 69 pages | colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH013
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Blairadam forest containing Director's comments, State Forest Officer's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 32 pages | colour on map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH012
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Bere forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 81 pages | black and white with colour on map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH011
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Brendon forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 55 pages | black and white, some colour figures
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH018
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Chiddingfold forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 89 pages | black and white, one colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH020
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Brechfa forest containing Chairman's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 53 pages | black and white with one colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH017
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Coed-Y-Brenin forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 55 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH025
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Culbin forest containing the Chairman's comments, Director's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 30 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH027
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Craigphadrig forest containing a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 22 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH026
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Cynwyd forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 26 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH029
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Dartmoor forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 39 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH030
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Newcastelton forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 44 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH045
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Mathrafal forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 49 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH043
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Northamptonshire group of forests containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 113 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH046
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Monaughty forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 31 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH044
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of the Black Isle forests containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 60 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH059
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Slaley forest containing the Conservator's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices
230 x 350mm | 24 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH054
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Thetford, King's and Swaffham forests containing Chairman's comments, State Forest Officer's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 101 pages | colour graphs and maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH060
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Strathyre forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 32 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH057
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Slattadale forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 49 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH055
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Slindon forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 28 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH056
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Redesdale forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 43 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH050
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Rosedale forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 26 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH051
Forest History
Foresrty Commission
1952
A history of Rothbury forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, Thrunton Section, Swarland Section, Hepburn Section, Birsley Wood, Appendices.
230 x 350mm | 83 pages | colour graphs and maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH052
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Radnor forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 39 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH048
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Ratagan forest containing the Chairman's comments, Director's comments, a general description of the area, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 48 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH049
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Selby forest containing the Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH053
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Thornthwaite forest containing an introduction by the Conservator, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 42 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH061
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Harwood forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 43 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH072
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Knapdale forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 33 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH066
Forest History
Forestyr Commission
1952
A history of Tintern forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 56 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH062
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Whitehaugh forest containing the Director's comments, State Forests Officer's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices
230 x 350mm | 31 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH064
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Kirkhill forest containing comments by the State Forests Conservator, comments by State Forests Officer and Conservator, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 29 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH068
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Cairn Edward-Bennan forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 30 pages | black and white with colour on map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH010
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Eggesford forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 47 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH035
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Margam forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 50 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH042
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Drummond Hill forest containing the Chairman's comments, a note by the State Forests Officer, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 45 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH032
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Lyminge forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 47 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH040
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1952
A history of Culloden forest containing the Chairman's comments, Director's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 46 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH028
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Chopwell forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 88 pages | black and white with colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH021
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Teindland forest containing the Chairman's comments, Director's comments, Foreword by the District Officer, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 29 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH058
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Forest of Deer containing the Chairman's comments, Director's comments, comments by State Forest Officer, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 44 pages | colour maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH036
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Alice Holt forest containing Chairman's comments, Conservator's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 74 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH001
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Allerston forest containing Chairman's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 54 pages | black and white with colour on maps
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH002
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Buriton forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 65 pages | black and white with one colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH019
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Drumtochty forest containing the Chairman's comments; Director's comments; Conservator's comments; Name, date of acquisition, area; Brief History prior to Acquisition; Geology; Acquired Plantations; Planting; Choice of Species; Problem areas; Fordoun section; Hardwood planting; Experimental mixtures; Later introductions; Underplanting; Method of planting and plants used; Past errors and their resulting problems; Research; Note by District Officer; Note by Research Branch; Thinning; Roads; The future; Appendices.
230 x 350mm | 41 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH033
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Laughton forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 29 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH038
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Marden forest containing a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 48 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH041
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Quantock forest containing Chairman's comments, an introductory note by the Conservator, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 61 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH047
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Clashindarroch forest containing Chairman's comments, Director's comments, general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 75 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH070
Forest History
Forestry Commission
1951
A history of Llantrisant forest containing Chairman's comments, a general description of the forest, silviculture, and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 29 pages | colour map
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH039
Forest History
W.R. Day, R.G. Sanzen-Baker
1938
A history of the condition of tree crops at Llandover and Llantrisant forests containing an introduction, past history of sites, history of policy and management, previous reports, topography, climate, geology, water systems, soils, vegetation, present condition of crops, factors affecting the growth of plantations, notes on woodland areas other than the forests, discussion of suitability of species, summary and appendices.
230 x 350mm | 156 pages | black and white
0
Free
Stock code:FCFH065
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Please direct orders to:
Forestry Commission Publications (CST)
Chetham House
Bird Hall Lane
Cheadle Heath
Cheshire, SK3 0ZP

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