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UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard.

This epub summary of the UK Forestry Standard, designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, provides a checklist of the Requirements and Guidelines for General Forestry Practice and each of the sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

An ePub version of the full UKFS is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (ePub)

ebook
978-0-85538-998-7
Free
UK Forestry Standard (UKFS)
Forestry Commission
2017
Practising sustainable forestry means managing our forests in a way that meets our needs at present but that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs. They will rightly expect that their forests and woodlands offer at least the same benefits and opportunities as we enjoy today. To sustain these expectations, the UK governments have set out their requirements for sustainable forest management in the UK Forestry Standard. Guidelines on how to meet the requirements are set out in sub-sections covering Biodiversity, Climate Change, Historic Environment, Landscape, People, Soil and Water.

This ePub has been designed for use on mobile devices such as iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. A printable pdf version is also available to download from this catalogue: UKFS (pdf)

eBook
978-0-085538-999-4
Free
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
This guidance note provides an introduction to the restoration and management of ancient wood pastures in Scotland. It is aimed at land managers, their advisers and agency staff involved in land management and grant assessment. It has also been developed to help applicants to the Scottish Rural Development Programme
deliver the ‘Management of Ancient Wood Pasture’ Option.
PDF only
None
Free
Stock code:FCFC154
UKFS Guideline Note
S Bell
2001
A4 leaflet | full colour | online only
0855385367
Free
Stock code:FCGN002
UKFS Guideline Note
Gordon S Patterson
2000
Welsh version (PDF)
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385286
Free
Stock code:FCGN001
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2018
Plant Health controls apply to a wide range of wood products, including firewood. These controls are in place to prevent the spread of pests and pathogens that would be ecologically and economically damaging if introduced to Great Britain (GB). Import controls are tree species specific, and may vary according to the country of origin and by the type of wood or wood product imported. This Guide explains the current rules for regulated firewood (including kindling) entering GB, and covers imports from countries outside the European Union (EU), as well as consignments originating in other EU member States.
A4 | colour | 7 pages | online only
978-0-85538-936-9
Free
Stock code:FCPH005
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2018
This Guide explains which imports of wood, wood products and bark are subject to chargeable import inspection, how much the fees are, and how they may be paid.

A credit application form for import business is available to download here as pdf file:
Credit application form
A4 | 11 pages | online only
978-0-85538-856-0
Free
Stock code:FCPH002
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2018
This Plant Health Guide sets out the requirements for landing controlled material from non-EU countries into Great Britain. It lists controlled genera and species and highlights the import regulations that apply to the landing of wood, wood products and bark from these species from countries outside of the EU. This 4th edition reflects recent changes to legislation.
A4 | 44 pages | colour
978-085538-975-8
Free
Stock code:FCPH001
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2017
Pine pitch canker, also known as pitch or pitch pine canker, is a serious canker disease of pines and Douglas fir caused by the fungus Fusarium circinatum. The disease affects trees in planted forests, nurseries, parks and gardens. In plantations, the disease leads to reduced growth and cone yield and can kill trees. It will also kill tree seedlings in nurseries. Pine pitch canker can have wider impacts in the landscape affecting recreational uses, tourism, and the aesthetic appearance of trees in parks and gardens. The fungus is thought to be native to Central America, but is highly damaging to some pine species elsewhere in the world, including parts of Europe, and further spread is likely. It is not present in Britain but there is a risk it could establish in the southeast if introduced.

Forest Research have also produced a field guide on pine pitch canker.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-960-4
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PPC
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2011
This leaflet sets out the obligations of manufacturers, repairers, recyclers and others involved in the wood packaging material sector under the United Kingdom Wood Packaging Material Marking Programme.
A4 | 12 pages | online only
978-0-85538-854-6
Free
Stock code:FCPH004
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2009
A4 | 22 pages | 2 colour
0
Free
Stock code:FCFC005
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2007
This booklet tells you what you need to know about getting permission to fell any trees for yourself or for someone else. It is for guidance only and is not a legally binding interpretation of the legislation (the Forestry Act 1967 as amended). If you are unsure as to whether you require a licence, speak to your nearest Forestry Commission office for guidance before you start any tree felling.
A4 | 8 pages | 2 colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCFC004
UKFS Guideline Note
Forestry Commission
2004
This booklet provides guidance on how to seek consent from the Forestry Commission for 'relevant projects' under the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations 1999. The relevant projects are deforestation, afforestation, forestry roads and forestry quarries.

For more information, visit our page on Environmental Impact Assessment

A4 booklet | 12 pages
0
Free
Stock code:FCCS053
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2016
Pine processionary moth is a serious pest of pine trees in southern Europe. The moth larvae (caterpillars) feed on pine needles and defoliate trees, which reduces tree growth and timber production. Large numbers of larvae can cause severe damage – weakening the trees sufficiently to make them vulnerable to other pests and diseases and, in some cases, leading to tree death. Since the 1990s the moth has been expanding its distribution in Europe and it can now be found breeding as far north as Paris in France. Although not present in the UK, the favourable climate and presence of suitable host trees in the south of Britain suggests that the pine processionary moth might be able to establish breeding populations in southern parts of England.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-939-0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PPM
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2016
Chestnut blight is a serious disease of chestnut trees caused by the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica. The fungus does little damage to host trees in its native range in Asia, but has devastated American chestnut when it was accidentally introduced to the USA more than 100 years ago via infected planting stock. The disease was introduced into Europe in the 1930s where it affects species such as the European or ‘sweet’ chestnut. It has since spread to most parts of the continent, causing serious damage in orchards and forests. Chestnut blight was detected for the first time in Britain in 2011 on planted imported trees, but is now considered eradicated. However, annual surveys and vigilence are needed to ensure that the UK remains free of the disease.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-943-7
Free
Stock code:FCPH-CB
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Plant Health controls apply to a wide range of wood products, including woodchip. These controls are in place to prevent the spread of pests and pathogens that would be ecologically and economically damaging if introduced to Great Britain (GB). Import regulations are tree species specific, and may vary according to the country of origin and by the type of wood or wood product imported. This note explains the current rules for regulated woodchip entering GB and covers imports from countries outside the European Union (EU), as well as consignments originating in other EU member States.
A4 | colour | 6 pages | online only
978-0-85538-937-6
Free
Stock code:FCPH006
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Pests and diseases can be carried on plants and trees, seeds, wood and wood products including wooden packaging material and isolated bark. They may also be carried on vehicles and machinery where they have not been properly cleaned and are carrying soil or plant debris. If you intend to export such material out of Great Britain to countries outside the EU you must comply with the importing country’s plant health regulations. The controls may require physical action by the exporter, such as removing plant debris from used forestry or agricultural machinery, or official inspection and certification. The information contained in this Guide details the application for phytosanitary certification procedures operated by the Forestry Commission.
A4 | colour | 7 pages | online only
978-0-85538-935-2
Free
Stock code:FCPH003
Plant Health 007
Forestry Commission
2015
This revised Guide sets out the obligations which apply to port authorities and others responsible for the points of entry in Great Britain where controlled wood, wood products or other goods which are accompanied by wooden packaging are landed. The Guide gives advice on the facilities needed, not only to meet the requirements of the Order, but also those which are necessary to enable inspectors to perform their work. These facilities include ones which allow the appropriate action to be taken when consignments do not meet the landing requirements prescribed in the Order and steps to prevent the introduction or spread of pests become necessary.
A4 | colour | 3 pages | online only
978-0-85538-719-X
Free
Stock code:FCPH007
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Xylella fastidiosa is a disease causing bacterium that affects a wide range of important woody plants and broadleaved trees. It invades the xylem vessels that transport water throughout plants and causes symptoms that range from leaf scorch to tree dieback and death. In the natural environment it is transmitted by xylem-fluid feeding insects such as leafhoppers. Until recently the bacterium was only known in the Americas and Taiwan, but an outbreak on olive trees in southern Italy was confirmed in 2013. Affected shrubs were also found in France in 2015. In Italy, the bacterium is apparently causing the rapid decline of olive trees over a large area and is under emergency measures. It has not yet been found in the UK and measures are in place to protect our trees.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-933-8
Free
Stock code:FCPH-XF
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2015
Plane wilt, also known as canker stain disease, is a serious disorder of plane trees, which are important amenity trees in the parks and avenues of many European cities. The disease is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis platani, which is present in the USA and Europe, but considered to be indigenous only to North America. It is thought to have been introduced into Europe in the Naples area of southern Italy during World War II, possibly arriving in infected wood from the USA used to package military supplies. Since then plane wilt has gradually spread to other European countries. In 2014 the UK became a Protected Zone to provide extra safeguards against accidental introduction of this disease on imported trees or the wood of plane.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-934-5
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PW
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Phytophthora austrocedrae is an aggressive, fungal-like pathogen that poses a serious threat to juniper trees in Britain. Juniper is an important native species and a significant proportion of the small area of juniper woodland in Britain is protected. Phytophthora austrocedrae was first reported in the UK in 2011 and infected trees have now been found at sites across Scotland and the north of England. The pathogen primarily attacks the roots of juniper trees, killing phloem and forming lesions which extend up into the lower stem. Eventually the tree will be killed by girdling of the main stem. Phytophthora austrocedrae is a
notifiable disease and all suspected cases should be reported to the plant health authorities.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-915-4
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PA
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Elm yellows is a disease of elm trees caused by a type of bacterium known as a phytoplasma. Symptoms of the disease can range from yellowing of leaves to dieback of foliage and branches. Elm yellows has been found affecting elm trees in North America and a few European countries, but in 2014 it was detected in the UK for the first time on imported material being propagated at a nursery in England. It is important that any further suspected cases of the disease are reported, so that infected saplings are not planted in the wider environment giving the phytoplasma the chance to spread. Elm yellows can affect healthy elm trees that are resistant to other serious conditions such as Dutch elm disease.
A4 | colour | 2 pages | online only
978-0-85538-906-2
Free
Stock code:FCPH-EY
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2014
Phytophthora lateralis is an aggressive, fungallike pathogen of Lawson cypress trees. It mainly attacks the roots of trees and can spread up through the trunk resulting in the rapid decline and death of the tree. Thought to originate in Asia, the disease is the main cause of mortality in Lawson cypress in its native range in the west coast of North America, and outbreaks have now been recorded in France and the Netherlands. The pathogen was first reported in the UK in 2010, most likely having been imported from mainland Europe, and it has since been found on sites across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is important that suspected cases of the disease are reported.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-901-7
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PL
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2013
The Asian longhorn beetle, a native to China and southeast Asia, is an invasive pest of trees in Britain. The larvae of the beetle feed on the wood of a wide range of broadleaved trees, which causes damage and will ultimately kill affected trees. The beetle has caused extensive damage to trees where it has been accidentally introduced in recent years – for example in the USA and Italy. Until recently the only evidence of the beetle in Britain was within imported wood packaging intercepted by Plant Health inspectors. However, a breeding population was found in Kent in 2012 – most likely introduced via wooden crates containing imported stone. The beetle is subject to regulation and movement controls are in place; it is important that all suspected sightings are reported.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-882-9
Free
Stock code:FCPH-ALB
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2013
Ash dieback is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees and it may lead to tree death. This Pest Alert provides information on distribution, symptoms, how the disease spreads and what you can do to help, as well as some brief information on other disorders of ash trees.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-ADD

Biosecurity - good working practice for those involved in forestry

Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2012
The Forestry Commission has produced guidance on biosecurity measures and good working practice for the forestry sector. This guidance is for anyone who works for, or carries out official duties on behalf of, the Forestry Commission. The booklet details practical steps designed to minimise the risk of introducing or spreading pests and diseases. It includes a decision tree which can be used to plan the level of biosecurity needed in a particular situation, and a table which shows the biosecurity measures to use for low-risk and high-risk activities.

The guidance, and additional information, is available on our biosecurity web pages.

85 x 54mm fold-out (Zcard) | colour
978-0-85538-869-0
Free
Stock code:FCMS028
Plant Health
Forestry Commission
2009
The pine-tree lappet moth has caused severe defoliation of Scots pine trees on many occasions in Eastern Europe. An initial assessment of the potential impact of the moth in Britain is that it presents a significant threat to the pine forests of northeast Scotland – and further afield if allowed to spread. This Pest Alert provides information on the level of threat of the moth, status and controls and what to look for to identify it.
A4 | 2 pages | colour | online only
0
Free
Stock code:FCPH-PTL