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Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2015
This guide will help forest managers and agents in Scotland decide the best future management option for afforested deep peat sites (defined here as soils with a peat layer of 50 cm or more). It explains the principles and assessment methods of the 'Forestry on peatland habitats' supplementary guidance that Forestry Commission Scotland published in 2014 to support the FC Guideline Note 'Forests and Peatland Habitats' (2000).
A4 | 25 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-927-7
Free
Stock code:FCPG104
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2015
The proportion of open space in many forests and woodlands is increasing as forest management plans are implemented and forests are restructured. Landowners and forest managers are increasingly being encouraged to manage this ground for biodiversity objectives but in some situations the management of open ground may be more complex and challenging than the management of the forests themselves. This Practice Guide provides information and guidance to forest managers on managing open ground in upland forests. The guidance covers planning open habitats in new forests, creating open habitats in existing forests and maintaining open habitat networks. The Guide sets out both general principles and guidance for specific habitats together with advice on monitoring.
A4 | colour | 44 pages
978-0-85538-913-0
10.00
Stock code:FCPG024
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Atmospheric pollution in the form of acid deposition has been dramatically reduced since international controls on emissions were introduced in the 1980s. However, acidification still affects acid-sensitive regions of the UK, damaging fisheries and causing adverse ecological changes in freshwaters. Forestry is known to influence the degree of acidification, principally due to the ability of forest canopies to capture more acid sulphur and nitrogen pollutants from the atmosphere than other types of vegetation. As a result, there is a need to manage forestry within vulnerable areas to ensure that it does not lead to increased acidification or delay the recovery of waters to Good Ecological Status. This Practice Guide describes the measures that can be taken to minimise adverse impacts and provides a methodology for determining whether new planting, restocking or felling proposals could pose a risk to freshwaters. It includes maps showing the locations of vulnerable areas and decision trees to guide those involved with woodland creation or the felling and restocking of existing forests in affected areas through the steps of catchment-based critical load and site impact assessments.

Digital maps showing catchments vulnerable to acidification are also available online.

A4 | colour | 32 pages
978-0-85538-911-6
6.00
Stock code:FCPG023
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Forest management plans are the key reference documents for monitoring and assessing forests and forestry practice in Britain. They define and communicate forest and woodland management proposals, set out how sustainable forest management is to be achieved and describe the consequences of management activities over time. Forest management planning involves assembling and integrating a wide range of information about a site and its potential, and a number of established design techniques are available to assist with this process. This Practice Guide provides step-by-step guidance to the techniques that can be used at each of the seven planning stages. The guidance applies to both the creation of new forests and woodlands and the management of existing forests and woodlands. It is aimed at forest and woodland owners and managers, forestry practitioners and all those involved in forest planning and the preparation of forest management plans. The Guide will also help those evaluating and approving plans and proposals, such as regulatory staff involved in grants and licences, and others with an interest in forestry consultation.

The Practice Guide is supported by a number of worked examples that show the development of the forest management planning process for typical landscape types found across the UK. The landscapes in these examples vary in scale and they serve to illustrate appropriate design techniques for different landscape types, as far as the development of the final sketch design.

A4 | 64 pages | colour
978-0-85538-894-2
14.00
Stock code:FCPG012
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2014
Wildfire events are predicted to increase in frequency in the UK due to increased land-use pressure and climate change. Wildfires can have a number of impacts on sustainable forest management and, in some extreme cases, may have devastating human and environmental consequences. Reducing the incidence and impact of wildfires in forests and woodlands through good management planning is important to protect the delivery of forest ecosystem goods and services. It can also help to prevent small wildfire incidents escalating into large-scale, out-of-control events. This Practice Guide supports the UK Forestry Standard by setting out good practice for building wildfire resilience into forest management planning. It describes the factors that can increase wildfire risk, sets out the planning measures that should be considered and outlines the forest management techniques that can be implemented to mitigate the risks to our forests and woodlands.

Wildfire risk assessment template for forests and woodlands

A4 | 52 pages | colour
978-0-85538-894-2
11.00
Stock code:FCPG022
Practice Guide
Ralph Harmer, Richard Thompson
2013
The restoration of plantations on ancient woodland sites (PAWS) to native woodland communities is a challenging objective that requires more management input than simply re-creating a stand of site native species. All sites differ, and optimising the choice of methods thorough site assessment is necessary before restoration starts. Where there is evidence of valuable remnants of the former ancient semi-natural woodland within the stand, management should secure their future, and promote their development and subsequent contribution to the future native woodland. This Guide provides a framework for selecting a method of stand management and advice on good practice that is appropriate for a particular site and related to the quality of the remnant features present.
A4 | 28 pages | colour
978-0-85538-885-1
6.00
Stock code:FCPG021
Practice Guide
Jonathan W Humphrey, Sallie Bailey
2012
Deadwood is a vital component of a properly functioning forest ecosystem. It plays an important role in sustaining biodiversity and in delivering ecosystem services such as soil formation and nutrient cycling. In the UK up to a fifth of woodland species depend on dead or dying trees for all or part of their life cycle and many of these species are rare or threatened. This Practice Guide has been written for the owners and managers of forests and woodlands who want to increase the value of their woodlands for biodiversity. It provides advice and practical guidance on managing deadwood to support sustainable forest management and the UK Forestry Standard Guidelines on Forests and Biodiversity.
A4 | 24 pages | colour
978-0-85538-857-7
6.00
Stock code:FCPG020
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2012
Diversity in forests is essential to conserve biodiversity and expand habitats, and to contribute towards enhancing landscape quality and recreation opportunities. In addition, introducing species and age diversity throughout a forest can increase their resilience to pests, diseases and fire, and extend economic opportunities.
This Practice Guide offers advice and ideas from which a forest manager may select options that meet their management objectives and are appropriate for their forest. The format of the guidance relates to the decisions which forest managers need to make when they are preparing fully integrated management proposals which will contribute to a Forest Plan.
A4 | 40 pages | colour
978-0-85538-859-1
5.00
Stock code:FCPG103
Practice Guide
Aileen Shackell, Robin Walter
2012
The guidance set out in this Practice Guide represents a step forward in our thinking about the benefits of the outdoors for health and well-being. It aims to inspire everyone involved with outdoor spaces in healthcare settings to think how they could be used for therapeutic purposes. Focusing on outdoor spaces across the NHS estate, the guidance is relevant to the full range of facilities, from the largest hospital to the smallest health centre. It also has a wider application wherever health and well-being is important, for example in places such as care homes and special schools. The Guide has been designed to be accessible to a non-technical audience, and will be of interest to those engaged with policy, and everyone interested in improving patient care – whether they deal directly with patients, or focus on grounds management. It will act as a good introduction for those new to the field, but many professionals already working in ‘therapeutic landscapes’ will also find it of interest.
A4 | 76 pages | colour
978-0-85538-853-9
13.50
Stock code:FCPG019
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
Since Medieval times, designed landscapes have evolved and at times changed dramatically in style and character. Throughout all periods and recognised styles however, trees have been an essential feature. In the 20th century social and economic changes proved challenging times for land management, with a combination of estate fragmentation, decline and changed land-use policies, specifically regarding new objectives for forest expansion and management. Now designed landscapes are appreciated for their contribution to local landscape character and the distinctiveness of many of Scotland’s landscapes.
Today the challenge is to protect, restore and rejuvenate the remaining legacy, whilst ensuring arboricultural and silvicultural practices can deal with the changes anticipated from climate change. This guidance is an essential contributor in helping ensure designed landscapes can meet those challenges.
A4 | 60 pages | colour
978-0-085538-846-1
5.00
Stock code:FCPG102
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission (England)
2010
Managing ancient and native woodland in England has been produced by Forestry Commission England as an aid to forestry and woodland managers working with ancient and native woodland. It brings together current good management practice to ensure these important woodlands are sustained for the future. Our ancient and native woodlands are one of our oldest land uses and most diverse ecosystems. They have often taken centuries to develop, and for generations they have been an essential source of timber, fuel, coppice products, venison and other sustainable products. They are a vitally important component of the English landscape and every one has it’s own long and fascinating history.
A4 | 64 pages | colour | online only
978-0-085538-821-8
Free
Stock code:FCPG201
Practice Guide
Matthew Ritchie, Jonathan Wordsworth
2010
Identifying the historic environment in Scotland's forests and woodlands has been prepared by Forestry Commission Scotland and Archaeology Scotland as an aid to forestry and woodland managers when considering the historic environment in their stewardship. The principal purpose of this practice guide is to provide an accessible introduction to exploring 'archaeology in the field'.
Archaeological and historical features represent a valuable and fragile resource. Once damaged or destroyed they can never be replaced nor properly understood - and important elements of our history and inheritance are lost. They are a critical part of the wider contemporary landscape and are part of the legacy that all land managers hand on to their successors. They can enhance the sense of place and historical context of the local community - and play a significant role in ensuring a more diverse and attractive landscape. An understanding and appreciation of the historic environment is essential if we are to protect the achievements of our ancestors for the benefit of future generations.
A4 | 40 pages | colour
978-0-85538-799-0
6.50
Stock code:FCPG101
Practice Guide
Peter Gosling
2007
This Practice Guide introduces the principles and practical methods for collecting, storing and propagating from seed a wide range of woody species commonly grown in the British Isles. It is aimed partly at anyone interested in raising a relatively small number of plants, and partly at commercial growers – as a useful reference but without the legal aspects. The Guide begins with information on flowering and fruit development, and recommendations for small–scale collecting, handling and processing. It then provides detailed advice on storage, dormancy and pretreatment methods for over 100 woody species. It gives suggestions of ‘things to try’ to hasten dormancy breakage in the most time consuming and dormant species. The Guide concludes with some tips on sowing seeds and raising seedlings.
A4 | 36 pages | colour
9780855387365
5.50
Stock code:FCPG018
Practice Guide
Colin Edwards
2006
Invasive rhododendron presents a unique problem to the managers of any habitats it colonises. If left untreated, this aggressive weed can rapidly occupy the entire understorey of a range of woodland types, open spaces within woodlands and heathland habitats. This Practice Guide provides guidance on managing and controlling rhododendron in invaded habitats, including information on site survey, prioritising areas for treatment, selecting the most effective control techniques, and monitoring of treated areas.
A4 | 36 pages
0-85538-704-1
6.50
Stock code:FCPG017
Practice Guide
I Willoughby
2004
This Practice Guide contains detailed recommendations for the establishment of new broadleaved woodlands by direct seeding, a silvicultural system whereby tree seed is sown by hand or machine into a prepared seedbed at a site intended for woodland creation.
0855386428
6.00
Stock code:FCPG016
Practice Guide
I Willoughby
2004
UK Government and European policy is to minimise pesticide use as far as possible. Covering pest, disease, vegetation and wildlife management, and based upon the latest research, Reducing Pesticide Use in Forestry can help forestry practitioners to assess the impact of any problem and select a non-chemical solution. Two simple flowcharts summarise the decision process and link to comprehensive reference material in the rest of the guide. If pesticide use is unavoidable, the guide should help managers to keep chemical use to the minimum level necessary consistent with good practice while at the same time reducing the risk of damage to the environment.
Spare copies of Decision Recording Sheet and the Optional Decision Aid [to assist in balancing the possible non-target effects of pesticides] are available to download here as pdf files:
Decision recording sheet
Optional decision aid
A4 | 140 pages | full colour
0855386177
16.00
Stock code:FCPG015
Practice Guide
Richard N Thompson
2003
The purpose of this Practice Guide is to give best practice advice to owners and managers on the restoration of native woodland on ancient woodland sites which have been planted with non-native species. The emphasis of the Guide is on the potential contribution of restoration to biodiversity and the practical considerations for successful development of native woodland.
A pull-out Site Assessment Guide (PDF) is included which has been designed to assist users in rating the restoration potential of any site and rank the relative priority of a number of sites.
A4 | 52 pages | full colour
0855385790
9.00
Stock code:FCPG014
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385871
3.00
Stock code:FCPG008
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 32 pages | 2-colour
0855385863
3.00
Stock code:FCPG007
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385855
3.00
Stock code:FCPG006
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385847
3.00
Stock code:FCPG005
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385839
3.00
Stock code:FCPG004
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385820
$3.00
Stock code:FCPG003
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385812
3.00
Stock code:FCPG002
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
2003
This Guide was first published in 1994. This edition is a reprint with a revised format and further reading section, otherwise the text has not been altered.
A4 | 28 pages | 2-colour
0855385804
3.00
Stock code:FCPG001
Practice Guide
David Lonsdale
2000
This Practice Guide indicates the responsibilities of owners and managers for assessing the risk of hazards from trees, and considers what inspection procedures might be appropriate. Preventative care of young trees and methods of protecting trees from wildlife damage are described. Details of tree hazards, signs of their occurrence, and options for remedial work are presented.
A4 | 28 pages | 2 colour
0855385146
7.00
Stock code:FCPG013
Practice Guide
Andy J Moffat
1997
This guide provides operational guidance to managers on the potential impacts of whole-tree harvesting upon the forest ecosystem. It also considers the likely risks on different sites and makes recommendations for managers faced with different harvesting options.
A4 | 12 pages | full colour
0855383607
5.00
Stock code:FCPG011
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
1996
A5 | 36 pages | 2 colour | online only
0855382716
Free
Stock code:FCPG010
Practice Guide
Forestry Commission
1995
A5 | 36 pages | 2 colour
0855383313
Free
Stock code:FCPG009
Practice Note
Gail Atkinson, Kieron Doick
2014
The regeneration of brownfield land to green space can deliver multiple benefits to society and the environment through improvements in the quality of a site and its surrounding landscape. Successful delivery of regeneration projects is dependent on the planning of project delivery and on good project management. This Practice Note describes the process of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt from past projects, and provide guidance to practitioners so that they avoid common pitfalls. It may also be used in the regeneration of brownfield land to other green and open space. The Note details each of the main stages of the regeneration process and the tasks associated with each stage. It also describes the role of the project delivery team and the disciplines needed for project delivery. Where a project has already started, guidance in this Note can help consolidate and refine existing project plans to improve project delivery and the likelihood of producing sustainable woodland. Aimed at those who plan and deliver brownfield regeneration to woodland projects, this Note supports project delivery planning and should be used by all members of the project delivery team.
A4 | 12 pages | colour
978-0-85538-898-0
Free
Stock code:FCPN022
Practice Note
Jason Hubert, Joan Cottrell
2014
Conserving the genetic diversity within our tree species and the processes that determine it are important for sustainable forest management and increasing the resilience of Britain’s forests and woodlands. The genetic diversity within a tree species at any one time is the result of many dynamic processes, and it provides the source for future adapted trees and woodlands. Its importance is recognised in The UK Forestry Standard and forestry practitioners are encouraged to consider genetic diversity when managing forests and woodlands. One method of genetic conservation is to manage specific areas with the intention of allowing the full cycle of natural processes to occur. These areas are called gene conservation units. This Practice Note sets out what you need to do to establish a gene conservation unit and describes the recommended management approaches. Many woodlands may already be managed in a way that would make them suitable, but a more formal recognition of a network of gene conservation units allows for a more robust and quantifiable approach. The approach described here allows for a consistent method of selecting and describing units across the full range of a species and is compatible with the approach promoted across Europe.
A4 | 6 pages | colour
978-0-85538-897-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN021
Practice Note
James Ogilvie, Kevin Lafferty
2013
Forests and woodlands bring wide-ranging and diverse benefits to people in Scotland. They are ideal places for people of all ages to participate in leisure, recreation and sports. However, forests are also workplaces. Forestry is an important part of the rural economy, and the production of timber provides revenue for landowners and jobs for the forestry sector and related businesses. Harvesting and haulage operations have been expanding over the past few years, as the forests that were established last century reach maturity, and so the need to balance woodland access with the need for safety during forest operations has never been more important. This is both to comply with health and safety legislation and fulfil land access obligations. Managing woodland access and forest operations is a pragmatic and practical process, involving land managers and access authorities, so that forest operations can take place safely, with minimal disruption to public access and recreational users. This Practice Note sets out clear steps to achieve this aim, including advice on early engagement with stakeholders and careful planning of operations. It is aimed at landowners and managers, forestry practitioners and operators, access authorities and recreation bodies.
A4 | colour | 8 pages
978-0-85538-893-5
Free
Stock code:FCPN104
Practice Note
Paul Haworth, Alan Fielding
2013
Golden eagles are primarily birds of open mountain country but they can use open woodland habitats and may benefit from prey species which use woodlands. In 2010 a suite of six new Special Protection Areas (SPAs) covering 360,000 ha were designated by the Scottish Government for the conservation of golden eagles, adding to the existing eight SPA sites in Scotland for this species. Around 28% of the UK golden eagle population lives in these protected areas. This Practice Note reviews the evidence for how golden eagles may be affected by woodland expansion in their breeding territories, and gives interim guidance on how to plan for woodland planting proposals within the protected areas to make them compatible with their golden eagle conservation objectives.
A4 | colour | 11 pages | online only
978-0-85538-889-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN103
Practice Note
Nigel A Straw, Christine Tilbury, David Williams
2013
The oak processionary moth is a serious forestry pest that is capable of causing complete defoliation of oak trees. Its caterpillars are also a hazard to health. Breeding populations of the moth were discovered for the first time in the UK in London in 2006 and these initial infestations have since spread and the moth has become more widely established. Controlling the moth is important, to protect trees from defoliation that can lead to decline and tree death, and to prevent risks to health. Control measures are most effective when applied at an early stage, before populations have started to increase. Effective control depends on monitoring the spread of the moth and detecting new outbreaks as soon as these arise, and also keeping track of abundance in areas where it is known to be present. There are a number of methods that can be used for monitoring but one of the most effective methods is to use pheromone traps. This Practice Note describes how these traps are used to capture oak processionary moths and what to do when moths are caught. It is aimed at forest and woodland managers, forestry practitioners, local authority tree and woodland officers, arboriculturalists and others who are actively involved with managing oak trees.
A4 | colour | 8 pages
978-0-85538-888-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN020
Practice Note
Steve Lee, Guy Watt
2012
Over 90% of the Sitka spruce planted in Britain today is from ‘improved’ planting stock, which is predicted to produce around 25% more timber at final rotation, compared with material imported from the Pacific North West. Forest managers have a choice of improved stock: seedlings raised from seed collected in orchards established around 25 years ago, or rooted cuttings taken from stock plants raised in nurseries using controlled pollinated seed produced by tree breeders. Although the predicted gains in growth rate often appear similar, the predicted gains for quality traits are usually superior for the rooted cutting stock. The down side is that the rooted cuttings are usually more expensive due to the extra production costs at the nursery. Which planting stock gives the best financial return in the long run is dependent on a number of variables. This Practice Note provides guidance to forest managers on how to choose the most appropriate planting stock, depending on thinning regime, rotation length, growth rate, and economic factors such as the premium paid for rooted cutting stock at the time of planting and the likely premium for green logs at harvest.
A4 leaflet | colour | 6 pages | online only
978-0-085538-875-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN018
Practice Note
Forestry Commission
2012
The great spruce bark beetle is found in forests throughout continental Europe. It damages spruce trees by tunnelling into the bark of the living trees to lay its eggs under the bark. The developing larvae feed on the inner woody layers, which weakens, and in some cases may kill, the tree. The beetle was first discovered in Britain in 1982 after it was accidentally introduced – most likely via a consignment of imported timber. It has become an established pest in the west of England and Wales but more recently it has expanded its range to southern Scotland. The good news for forest managers is that the beetle can be effectively managed by the controlled release of its natural predator Rhizophagus grandis. This Practice Note provides managers with a framework for assessing the risks to forests and advice on what to look out for if trees are affected. Guidance is given on the control techniques that have been developed to minimise the impact of the beetle and what action should be taken if the beetle is found.
A4 leaflet | colour | 8 pages
978-0-085538-872-0
Free
Stock code:FCPN017
Practice Note
Forestry Commission
2013
Everyone involved in forestry work has health and safety duties and responsibilities. This Practice Note provides guidance to help landowners, forest managers and forestry practitioners manage public safety on harvesting sites. Forest operations are high-risk activities, and the management issues involved in harvesting and hauling timber while maintaining public access to forests and woodlands can be complex. There are a number of tasks that have to be undertaken – both during planning and while carrying out operations – to ensure that people’s health and safety is not put at risk. This Note sets out the different roles and responsibilities for managing public safety to ensure that activities on and around harvesting worksites are co-ordinated and the right tasks are carried out by the right people. It provides information and advice on suitable control measures and illustrates good practice through the use of scenarios. The guidance was first published in 2001 by the Forestry and Arboriculture Safety Training Council (FASTCo).

Users in Northern Ireland should follow the specific guidance in the Forest Service Practice Note Managing public safety on forestry worksites

A4 | colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-876-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN019
Practice Note
Forestry Commission (Scotland)
2011
White-tailed eagles (sea eagles) were re-introduced to Scotland from the 1970s and there are now over 50 breeding pairs. They frequently nest and roost in woodlands and tend to use habitual nest sites. The species has a high degree of legal protection, and woodland managers need to plan operations carefully to avoid disturbing the birds or damaging their nests. During the breeding season, between 1 February and 31 August, most forestry operations and activities should be avoided or severely restricted within 250 m of an active nest. Depending on circumstances, it may be possible to carry out a range of management and recreational activities between 250 m and 500 m from an active nest without risk of disturbance. At other times, activities up to and around nest sites may normally be carried out with little risk of disturbance, although habitually-used nests themselves are protected from damage and destruction, even when not in use. At any time, birds should be protected from repeated disturbance (harassment), for example at roost sites, as this is also an offence.
A4 leaflet | 10 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-826-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN101
Practice Note
W L Mason
2010
Dense natural regeneration of Sitka spruce and other conifers is an increasingly common feature of both recently clearfelled sites and stands managed under continuous cover forestry in upland forests of the British Isles. This regeneration can be managed by combining natural self-thinning in the early stages of stand
establishment with management intervention to cut access racks and carry out selective respacing to favour the best quality trees. The target density should be about 2000–2500 stems per hectare in young regeneration or on windfirm sites where thinning will take place. On less stable sites that are unlikely to be thinned, a single intervention to a target density of 1750–2000 stems per hectare should improve mean tree diameter without compromising timber quality. Managing natural regeneration in continuous cover forestry or mixed stands can be based upon similar principles but the growth of the regenerated trees will be more variable.
A4 leaflet | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-804-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN016
Practice Note
Sandra Denman
2010
Oak trees in Britain have long suffered from dieback disorders but a new disease called acute oak decline is currently causing particular concern. A typical symptom of the disease is dark, sticky fluid bleeding from small cracks in the bark on the trunk of the tree. This stem bleeding may be extensive, with as many as 20 or more bleeding patches on an infected tree, and the canopy may become thin as the tree approaches death. Some trees die within four or five years of the onset of symptoms. Bacteria are thought to be the cause of the stem bleeds and tests to confirm this are underway. Currently, the condition appears to be most prevalent in the English Midlands but cases have also been reported in Wales. Woodland managers should survey, record and monitor infected trees and take the appropriate recommended action, which may include felling diseased oaks. Felled material should not be removed from affected sites unless the bark and sapwood have been removed and destroyed.
A4 leaflet | 6 pages | colour | online only
978-0-85538-802-7
Free
Stock code:FCPN015
Practice Note
John Gurnell, Peter Lurz, Robbie McDonald, Harry W Pepper
2009
Practical surveying and monitoring techniques are essential for anyone involved in studying or managing squirrel populations in forests and woodland in Britain. Survey methods can be used to establish the presence of squirrels in a particular area and, if used systematically, can detect significant changes in the distribution or abundance of populations and species over time. Data gathered from surveys can be used to monitor how threatened populations of red squirrels are responding to conservation management or to environmental change, and they can also be used to assess the efficacy of grey squirrel control measures. This Practice Note describes how to plan a survey and gives guidance on which method(s) to use. Five indirect survey techniques are described, which are based on either sightings or signs of squirrels, and advice is given on their suitability for different types of habitat at different times of the year.
A4 leaflet | full colour | 12 pages
978-0-85538-792-1
Free
Stock code:FCPN011
Practice Note
Brenda A Mayle
2007
This edition replaces the previous versions published in 2003 and 2004. It contains updates regarding legislation on the use of warfarin.
A4 leaflet | 16 pages | 4 colour | online only
978-0-85538-735-8
Free
Stock code:FCPN004
Practice Note
David Wainhouse
2007
978-0-85538-730-3
Free
Stock code:FCPN014
Practice Note
Andy J Moffat
2006
A4 leaflet | colour
085538686X
Free
Stock code:FCPN013
Practice Note
Peter Gosling
2002
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385642
Free
Stock code:FCPN012
Practice Note
Alan Armstrong
2002
Please note that this revised edition replaces the previous version published in August 1999.
A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855385677
Free
Stock code:FCPN007

Nant-yr-Hwch long-term forest design plan: an example of good practice from the private sector

Practice Note
S Bell
2000
[Due to the large size of this document, a pdf file is not available]
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385154
Free
Stock code:FCPN010
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour | online only
0855385057
Free
Stock code:FCPN009
Practice Note
Roger Herbert
1999
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385030
Free
Stock code:FCPN008
Practice Note
Brenda A Mayle
1999

This Note provides information on: identifying whether there are deer present and of which species; deciding whether deer are causing damage; the ways in which deer problems can be prevented and knowing where to go for more advice.

A4 leaflet | full colour
0855385014
Free
Stock code:FCPN006
Practice Note
Gordon S Patterson
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383801
Free
Stock code:FCPN005
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383739
Free
Stock code:FCPN003
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998
A4 leaflet | full colour
0855383720
Free
Stock code:FCPN002
Practice Note
Harry W Pepper
1998

This Practice Note discusses in detail the nearet neighbour method and its use as a decision making tool for wildlife management.

A4 leaflet | 2 colour
0855383712
Free
Stock code:FCPN001
Field Guide
Forestry Commission
2015
This Field Guide provides guidance on the control of volume to be removed when marking a thinning and a guide to thinning yields. There are four sections: the first describes the yield class system and how yield class is assessed in a stand. The second covers thinning practice, including the type, intensity and cycle of thinning, how to calculate the thinning yield, the timing of thinning, and how the thinning is controlled. The third describes the field procedures for estimating top height, basal area and volume marked, and how to calculate mean diameter. The final section presents general yield class curves for a selection of common species. A summary of the office and field procedures to be followed when marking a thinning is printed on the inside front cover.
A5 | colour | 56 pages
978-0-85538-930-7
14.00
Stock code:FCFG004

Forest Seedlings: A guide to the identification of tree and shrub seedlings in Britain

Field Guide
Richard Jinks, Matt Parratt
2014
The ability to accurately identify tree and shrub seedlings is invaluable to anyone with an interest in forests and woodlands and it is fundamental to practical woodland management. However, identifying seedlings in their first year of growth is not as straightforward as identifying adult trees and shrubs, as they are often strikingly different in appearance.

Forest Seedlings is a new digital field guide to identifying tree and shrub seedlings in the British Isles. The guide has been developed by experts working for the Forestry Commission in Great Britain and covers nearly 100 species commonly found in British forests and woodlands.

The guide contains stunning high-resolution images of leaves and other seedling features that can be used for identification. Species can be searched for and listed by their common and scientific names and dynamic filtering allows users to identify seedlings based upon a number of key characteristics. The ‘Field notes’ tool provides an easy way to add notes and automatically record the locations of specimens using the device GPS, which does not require a mobile phone signal.

Note: The android app is unavailable at the moment, a new version is currently in development. The current iOS app only works on iOS10 or earlier, a new version, which will work on iOS11, is currently in development.



App
0
1.49
Stock code:FCAPP001

Timber Measurement

Field Guide
Ewan D Mackie, Robert W Matthews
2008
Timber measurement was first published in 1983 as Booklet 49. Its punchy, practical style proved popular with practitioners trying to work out how to take basic measurements on trees and timber and apply standard forest mensuration procedures in the field. This revised edition has been produced primarily to achieve consistency with the second edition of Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners. The new edition includes a number of significant changes, including a revised section on weight measurement. The section on abbreviated tariffing has been amended for consistency with Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners. The opportunity has also been taken to make small refinements to the information in all sections to improve clarity and, in a departure from the original format, a number of decision trees have been included to help guide users through the various methods and procedures.
A5 spiral bound | 66 pages | 2 colour
978-0-085538-749-5
16.00
Stock code:FCFG002

Roundwood and sawlog volume tables

Field Guide
Forestry Commission
2007
This publication combines and replaces Forestry Commission Field Book 1: Top diameter sawlog tables and Forestry Commission Field Book 11: Mid diameter volume tables. The top diameter method for assessing volume is restricted to groups of sawlogs, preferably of uniform length up to 8.4 m. Volume determination using the mid diameter method is traditionally used for assessing timber lengths such as sawlogs, selected poles and billets. Further information on the choice of volume assessment method can be found in Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners where these tables are reproduced.
A5 spiral bound | 50 pages | 2 colour
978-0-85538-723-5
10
Stock code:FCFG003

The identification of soils for forest management

Field Guide
Fiona Kennedy
2002
The aim of this Field Guide is to assist forestry practitioners in making responsible management decisions by providing them with a means of rapid soil identification. This is done via a series of keys aimed at those with little or no experience of soil classification.
A5 spiral field guide | 56 pages | full colour
0855385596
17.00
Stock code:FCFG001
Management handbook
R.W. Matthews, T.A.R. Jenkins, E.D. Mackie, E.C. Dick
2016
Yield models are one of the foundations of forest management. They provide information about the patterns of tree growth and potential productivity that can be expected in forest stands of different tree species, with varying growth rates, when managed in different ways. Yield models are in daily use by forest managers and practitioners when making decisions about the future management of a forest – whether it is an individual stand of trees or a whole estate. They are also applied when forecasting future levels of production, when making commitments to supply timber markets, and for planning and scheduling forest operations. The outputs of yield models support many other calculations and models relevant to the evaluation of forests and forestry. These include analyses of the development of forest structure at the stand and landscape scales, the modelling of timber and wood properties, the estimation of forest biomass and carbon stocks, the modelling of forest greenhouse gas balances and the economic evaluation of forest policies and forest management options. This handbook is designed for those who would like to know more about the theory underpinning yield modelling. It will be of use to forest and woodland managers and practitioners, researchers and students.

The Forest Yield software is available from: www.forestry.gov.uk/forestyield

A5 | 96 pages | colour
978-0-85538-942-0
19.00
Stock code:FCBK048

Managing Native Broadleaved Woodland

Management handbook
Ralph Harmer, Gary Kerr, Richard Thompson
2010

Native woodlands occupy an important place in both our countryside and cultural heritage. They are managed to provide timber and other wood products but nowadays are often equally valued as habitats for wildlife and areas for recreation. The aim of this handbook is to provide advice that will help owners and managers understand and manage native broadleaved woodlands. A wide variety of subjects are covered, from identifying woodland communities and management planning, to silvicultural techniques, nature conservation and vegetation management – including the use of grazing animals. The background and principles of each topic are explained and case studies are used throughout. Interactions between site characteristics and historic management are also considered in relation to future management options. The handbook also highlights the questions that managers should ask, when considering management options for their woodlands, that take account of location, site characteristics and objectives.

Please note this publication is only available to buy from TSO
T: +44 (0)870 600 5522
W: www.tsoshop.co.uk

B5 book | 510 pages | colour
978-0-11-497344-5
30
Stock code:FCBK003

Forest mensuration: a handbook for practitioners

Management handbook
Forestry Commission
2006
Forest Mensuration is an essential, practice-based handbook designed to help all those working in the timber trade and forestry understand how to measure trees and timber. Written for practitioners, researchers and students, this new edition aims to cut through some of the complexities of forest mensuration by providing a logical format and additional advice to help readers find the information they need more easily. A key to measurement procedures at the start of the book guides readers towards selecting appropriate methods of measurement. The Handbook includes a comprehensive set of charts, tables and equations alongside step-by-step guidance to help readers in applying procedures which currently represent best practice in British forestry.
Book | 330 pages | 2-colour
0855386215
24.00
Stock code:FCBK039

Managing the pinewoods of Scotland

Management handbook
W L Mason
2004
Our native pinewoods have long been treasured for their landscape and cultural values, as well as their contribution to the economy through timber production and recreational activities. Following decades of exploitation and degradation, recent management has concentrated primarily on the conservation of what remained of these ancient semi-natural woodlands. The aims of this handbook are to promote the maintenance and expansion of our existing native pinewoods, encourage the integration with plantations within the pinewood zone, and support the creation of new native pinewoods.
Book | 234 pages | full colour
0855386371
25.00
Stock code:FCBK002

The silviculture and management of coppice woodlands

Management handbook
Ralph Harmer
2003
Coppice woodlands form an important part of our cultural heritage and are often valuable areas for conservation and biodiversity. The 20th century saw a marked decline in coppice but in recent years long neglected woodlands have been brought back into active management. This renewed interest has been mainly for wildlife benefits, but some well-managed crops, especially in-cycle coppice, can have commercial value. Although coppicing is a simple process the results achieved may be disappointing. This may be due to a variety of reasons such as the size and age of stool, management of overstorey trees and the damaging effects of browsing. The aim of this book is to give information and advice on the management of trees, stools and woodlands as coppice, which is necessary if coppice woodlands are to continue to produce marketable crops and the variety of conservation, amenity and landscape objectives in which managers are interested.
Book | 88 pages | full colour
085538591X
12.00
Stock code:FCBK001