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NEWS RELEASE No: 1666622 MARCH 2017


Go wild for WWF’s Earth Hour


Stargazing, trees

Forestry Commission England is encouraging everyone to switch off their lights for WWF’s Earth Hour and experience the forests after dark. 

There’s a wild line-up of twilight events being hosted in forest locations across the country on 25th March, allowing all ages to step outside in support for our planet.

Across England children can be crowned master of the marshmallow; families can take a stroll on a stargazing walk, give glow painting a go, listen out for night-time wildlife at sound box stations and create a candle lantern.

There’s something to suit everyone, whilst giving the nation the opportunity to spend their Earth Hour in the natural environment it celebrates.

Millions will take part in the global climate change demonstration by taking one simple step to switch off their lights for one hour. Go one step further and enjoy your hour of darkness in the forest.

Sign up to WWF Earth Hour and find a forest near you www.wwf.org.uk/EHsignup 

Top five forest Earth Hour events

Whinlatter Forest

Come and experience an unforgettable night under the stars in Whinlatter Forest.

Join an evening of stargazing from 5pm which will introduce you to the wondrous sounds of the forest at night and give you a closer look at the night sky.

Collect some wood along the way for the camp fire and finish with a hot chocolate!

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/BEEH-AJ3JH7

Haldon Forest Park

Enjoy a self-led walk through the woods on our Discovery Trail, follow glowing star shapes and enjoy lots of fun activities along the way including star lit tunnels and sound box stations where you can listen to night-time animals in the forest.

Take part in the marshmallow toasting masterclass around the campfire, watch the shadow puppet theatre or have a go a glow painting!

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/BEEH-AJHL8K

Great Wood

Join night sky enthusiast Chris Sperring MBE and Forestry Commission Rangers on a walk through Great Wood.

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/BEEH-AJLJDP

Grizedale

Explore the forest by candle lantern on a night walk. Gather round the campfire with a hot chocolate and create some chalky constellations.

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/BEEH-AGMLVB

Leigh Woods

Enjoy a guided walk through Leigh Woods, play plenty of night games, listen out for night-time wildlife and indulge in a spot of stargazing.

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/BEEH-AJKN57 

ENDS -

Notes to editors

Media Contact: Emily Beaumont on 0300 067 4107 or emily.beaumont@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

  1. Forestry Commission England is the government department responsible in England for protecting, expanding and promoting the sustainable management of woods and forests and increasing their value to society and the environment. Further information can be found at www.forestry.gov.uk/england
  2. Forestry Commission Discovery Passes vary in price from £20-£50 for annual membership. For more information visit www.forestry.gov.uk/pass
  3. About Earth Hour
    Earth Hour, organised by WWF, is the world’s largest climate change demonstration. In the UK last year, over 6 million people took part, nearly 200 landmarks, along with thousands of schools, businesses and organisations.. Iconic landmarks including Big Ben and Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge, Blackpool Tower, The Kelpies, Caerphilly Castle and many more joined the global lights out. Globally, from Samoa to Tahiti, a record 178 countries and territories took part in the world’s biggest Earth Hour yet.  The Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House, the world’s tallest building Burj Khalifa in Dubai, South Africa’s Table Mountain, The Acropolis in Athens, The Eiffel Tower in Paris, The Empire State Building and Times Square in New York City, and the Las Vegas Strip were just a few of the world-famous landmarks that joined in. This year is the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour and set to be the biggest yet.
  4. About WWF
    WWF is one of the world’s largest independent conservation organisations, with more than five million supporters and a global network active in more than one hundred countries. Through our engagement with the public, businesses and government, we focus on safeguarding the natural world, creating solutions to the most serious environmental issues facing our planet, so that people and nature thrive.  Find out more about our work, past and present at wwf.org.uk