Green networks and people

How can people benefit more from urban parks and greenspace?

Mothers and babies taking part in a Buggyfit event at Bentley Community Woodland. Kids running in the forest
Aerial photo of urban green networks (Patricia & Angus MacDonald/Aerographica)
(Photo: Patricia & Angus MacDonald/Aerographica)

Summary

Parks, gardens and greenspace in and around towns and cities provide opportunities for recreation, health and well-being; they also improve the landscape, support biodiversity and improve water and air quality. Through applied research, the Forest Research team found ways to evaluate this multifunctional greenspace and support green network planning and management.

Key findings/outputs

  • Comprehensive review of existing approaches to green network planning and management
  • Variability in how local authorities asses the quality and public perception of greenspace
  • Large differences in the availability and use of social data between local authorities
  • Significantly different approaches to encourage the use of greenspace
  • Development of a green network model to inform development strategies that promote walking/cycling through green networks and encourage more leisure use

Publications

Funding and partners

The research was funded by:

Status

Ended 2012.

Contacts

For general information about this project contact:

Darren Moseley

For information about the social benefits of green networks contact:

Mariella Marzano