Publications on climate change

Publications about climate change impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation and mitigation

Front coverAir temperature regulation by urban trees and green infrastructure (PDF-1610K)

Report describing how urban trees can help combat climate change temperature rises in cities.

By Kieron Doick and Tony Hutchings.

Forestry Commission Research Note 12.


Publication coverClimate change and British woodland (PDF-2872K)

The global climate is changing as a result of human activity, caused primarily by the increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The most recent predictions for the UK suggest an increase in temperature and changes in rainfall patterns, wind speed, cloud cover and humidity. This Information Note explains how these environmental changes may affect the growth of trees, including the distribution of individual species. Implications for woodland management and practice are outlined, and guidance is given on climate change adaptation.

By Mark Broadmeadow and Duncan Ray.

Forestry Commission Information Note 69.


Publication coverClimate change and British woodland: What does the future hold? (PDF-911K)

By Mark Broadmeadow et. al.

From Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2002-3.


Publication coverClimate change and forest genetic diversity: Implications to sustainable forest management (PDF-410K)

By Jason Hubert

From Ecotype 34 - Forest Research Biodiversity and conservation newsletter, May 2006.


Cover of reportClimate change: Impacts and adaptation in England's woodlands (PDF-1920K)

By: D. Ray, J. Morison and M. Broadmeadow.

Forestry Commission Research Note 201.


Publication coverClimate change: Impacts and adaptation in Scotland (PDF-1416K)

By Duncan Ray

Summary from Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2007-8.


Publication coverClimate change: Impacts on UK forests

Describes current thinking on the most likely effects of climate change on UK forests and woodlands. It is recommended reading for forest managers and advisers, students and all those with an interest in the consequences of global change to our forests.

By Mark Broadmeadow et. al.

Forestry Commission Bulletin 125.


Publication coverClimate change - Implications for forestry in Britain (PDF-4013K)

Global climate is changing as a result of human activity, particularly because of the effects of increased amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The most recent predictions from the UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) suggest an increase in temperature and changes in rainfall, wind speed, cloud cover and vapour pressure. This Information note explains how the environmental changes that Britain is likely to experience may affect the growth of trees, and how research can improve our understanding of these effects.

By Mark Broadmeadow.

Forestry Commission Information Note 31.


Cover of the Read ReportCombating climate change – A role for UK forests

The first National Assessment of Forestry and Climate Change. Report provides peer-reviewed information at the national level following on from the recommendations from the global evaluation provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Prepared by a panel of authors chaired by Professor Sir David Read, Emeritus Professor of Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield, and which included Forest Research scientists. The report is published by TSO (The Station Office). 


Cover of reportEffeithiau newid yn yr hinsawdd ar goedwigaeth yng Nghymru (PDF-425K)

(Impacts of climate change on forestry in Wales).

Report compiled for Forestry Commission Wales by Duncan Ray.

Forestry Commission Research Note 301(W).


Publication coverThe evidence supporting the use of continuous cover forestry in adapting Scotland’s forests to the risks of climate change (PDF-891K)

Report to Forestry Commission Scotland summarising the role of Continuous Cover Forestry in future climate conditions.

By Victoria Stokes and Gary Kerr.


Publication coverForest Research: Climate change projects (PDF-825K)

Summary of our programme of climate change-related research.

September 2008.


Publication coverForestry and climate change

Explores how forests will interact with the physical and natural world, and with human society as the climate changes. Also considered is how the world's forests can be managed to contribute to the mitigation of climate change and to maximize the full range of economic and non-market benefits.

Edited by Peter Freer-Smith, Mark Broadmeadow and Jim Lynch.


Front coverForests and carbon: a review of additionality (PDF-559K)

Review helping to clarify the concept of additionality, and provide an overview of how it is currently applied in both compliance and voluntary carbon markets, including tests used and underlying evidence base requirements. It provides background for considering how the additionality principle might be interpreted and applied in establishing standards for woodland climate change mitigation projects in the UK, including in developing an industry Code of Good Practice.

By Gregory Valatin.

Forestry Commission Research Report 13.


Front coverForests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management (PDF-1168K)

Reviewing methods to value carbon over time, examining approaches for dealing with risk and considering approaches that could be used in extending standards to forestry more generally in voluntary carbon markets in the UK.

By Gregory Valatin.

Forestry Commission Research Report 12.


Publication coverForests, carbon and climate change - The UK contribution (PDF-1559K)

How forests in the UK contribute to the carbon cycle on both a local and global scale.

By Mark Broadmeadow and Robert Matthews.

Forestry Commission Information Note 48.


Cover of reportImpacts of climate change on forestry in Wales (PDF-426K)

Report compiled for Forestry Commission Wales by Duncan Ray.

Forestry Commission Research Note 301.


Cover of reportImpacts of climate change on forests in Scotland (PDF-1225K)

Report compiled for Forestry Commission Scotland by Duncan Ray with sections also drafted by Dave Wainhouse, Joan Webber and Barry Gardiner.


Cover of reportImpacts of climate change on forestry in Scotland - A preliminary synopsis of spatial modelling research (PDF-921K)

By Duncan Ray.

Forestry Commission Research Note 101.


Publication coverPotential impacts of drought and disease on forestry in Scotland (PDF-2380K)

By Sarah Green and Duncan Ray.

Forestry Commission Research Note 4.


Publication coverRole of forest genetic resources in helping British forests respond to climate change (PDF-960K)

An overview of the issues surrounding the use of genetic resources in British forestry and presents possible strategies to help forests and woodlands adapt to the effects of climate change through the use of such resources.

By Jason Hubert and Joan Cottrell.

Forestry Commission Information Note 86.


The storage of carbon in trees and timber (PDF-820K)

Research Information Note 160 (1989). Out of print.


Publication coverStreet tree valuation systems (PDF-468K)

Street trees and urban woodlands provide a number of environmental and social benefits, including contributing to climate change adaptation and mitigation and providing urban green space. This Note presents the results of a review of three approaches to estimating the amenity value of street trees: CAVAT, Helliwell and i-Tree.

By Vadims Sarajevs.

Forestry Commission Research Note 8.


Front coverUnderstanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain (PDF-7422K)

This report summarises key information on carbon stocks in British forests, the fluxes of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, how these are affected by changes as trees grow, and how they are affected by forest operations and other forest management decisions.

By James Morison, Robert Matthews et al.

Forestry Commission Research Report 18.


Publication coverUnderstanding the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of forestry on peat soils in Scotland (PDF-2140K)

Understanding the consequences of forestry activity on peat soil organic carbon (SOC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance. Report compiled by Forest Research for Forestry Commission Scotland, September 2010.

By James Morison et al.


Publication coverWoodland and our changing environment (PDF-911K)

By Mark Broadmeadow and Robert Matthews.

Forestry Commission In Brief Factsheet.

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