Research highlights

2013

  • Artificial protocol published
    • Kabir et al. 2013. “An improved artificial pathogenicity assay for Dothistroma needle blight on Pinus radiata”. Australasian Plant Pathology 42, 503-510.
  • Dothistroma needle blight in Slovenia is caused by both Dothistroma pini and Dothistroma septosporum
    • Piškur et al. 2013. Forest Pathology.
  • Dothistoma needle blight in Greece is caused by D. septosporum
    • Tsopelas et al. 2013. Disease Notes
    • On Pinus brutia and P. nigra
  • First report of DNB (D. septosporum) in Norway
    • Solheim and Vuorinen 2013. European Journal of Plant Pathology.
  • DNB caused by D. septosporum and D. pini in Belgium
    • Schmitz et al. Researchgate.net
  • D. septosporum population genetics in Czech Rep.
    • Tomsovsky et al. 2013. Plant Pathology
    • Haplotypic diversity high, with 87 unique and 13 shared haplotypes (probable clones) identified in 121 samples.
    • Structure analysis: two populations, with an uneven distribution over the sampling sites.
    • Grouping of sites to populations did not follow a geographical pattern.
    • Random mating tests: a significant clonal mode of reproduction in most cases, but the intrapopulation haplotypic diversity is unexpectedly high.
  • D. septosporum population diverse in Europe – native?
    • Drenkhan et al. 2013. European Journal of Plant Pathology.
    • D. septosporum population genetics in Estonia, Finland and Czech Rep.
    • Considerable diversity in allele patterns of several microsatellite loci: does not support the hypothesis of a recent introduction.
    • Genetic diversity was considerable in all three populations, and did not differ significantly between populations.
    • Suggest slight migration from south to north, even if no similar haplotypes were found between any of the populations.
    • Genetic differentiation and distance reflected geographic distances between the populations.
    • Differentiation between populations was low but statistically significant.
    • High haplotypic diversity, low number of identical haplotypes, and low degree of genetic disequilibrium in all investigated populations suggested occurrence of sexual proliferation in this area, although the sexual state of the fungus has not been recorded in Estonia and Finland.
    • High diversity may suggest a long presence of D. septosporum in northern Europe, or alternatively, its recent introduction as a massive inoculum from an unknown direction.
  • Microspatial genetic diversity of D. septosporum in Poland
    • Kraj and Kowalski 2013. Forest Pathology.
    • P. nigra seed orchard
    • Significant spatial genetic structure of the population