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Log arrangements

Logs from surrounding woodland areas can be arranged in patterns to create seating, balancing beams or other play opportunities.

How to build

  • Logs: preferably oak or sweet chestnut for longevity, though larch, pine and Douglas fir will suffice.
  • Lift ends partially from the ground to protect against water ingress, support on a timber / log bearer.
  • To avoid logs slipping off each other create a suitable joint and fix with a long coach screw or hardwood dowel in a predrilled hole. If using screws, countersink holes and use dowel to plug. Make sure all metal fixings are galvanised to reduce corrosion from natural acids in wood. Remove bark from joints and cross over points.
  • Make sure that all log ends have been chamfered to reduce likelihood of splintering.
  • Remove bark from outset Logs from surrounding woodland areas can be arranged in patterns to create seating, balancing beams or other play opportunities. Log arrangements or once it is beginning to be worn off. A flat top can be roughly cut into the top of the log and etched with chainsaw grooves to reduce chances of slipping.
  • Gaps can be left between logs to step over and steps can be cut into logs that are ascending slopes.
  • Laying logs as a narrow walkway through a dense plantation produces a similar effect to building decking.

Safety issues

  • As with other log features check stability of logs, potential trap points and chances of slipping once bark has fallen off.
  • Refer to fall heights, falling space and entrapment in safety section of appendix.
Last updated: 8th March 2016

England's Woods and Forests are cared for by Forest Enterprise England, an agency of the Forestry Commission.